Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between Canada & Germany
Uni-Hauptgebäude, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Thüringen, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage, Weltkulturerbe, fotoeins.com

Weimar UNESCO WHS: Bauhaus Old and New

There’s a clear transition in time where architecture and design took a step from behind closed doors for the sole purview of the rich and royal and out into the open for public and general consumption. It’s no surprise the years from the end of the 19th-century into the 20th-century marked big changes, with Art Nouveau at the time as part of the Secession movement. Throughout Europe, rebellion and revolution were in the air, economically, politically, and culturally.

The Bauhaus movement also helped initiate a conversation, creating and fostering a relationship between industry’s machinery and artistic or cultural creativity. Bauhaus opened in Weimar in 1919, before moving to Dessau and Berlin. The rise of the National Socialists deemed Bauhaus “degenerate” and did all they could to eliminate a movement and her people deemed counter to National Socialist policy. With Bauhaus’ forced closure in 1933 by the Nazis, a number of practitioners escaped Germany to other parts of the world, including the United States and Argentina.

For their deep and wide-ranging influence on 20th-century art, architecture, and design, an incomplete list of names includes Martin Gropius, Lyonel Feininger, Gerhard Marcks, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Oskar Schlemmer, Herbert Bayer, Irene Bayer (née Hecht), Karla Grosch, Hannes Meyer, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, etc. In particular, László Moholy-Nagy would move to Chicago in the United States and established in 1937 the New Bauhaus which became the Institute of Design in 1944.

Tucked away on a university campus a few minutes south of the Weimar city centre, two important building lie across from each other: the Saxony Academy of Art1 building and the Grand Ducal Saxony School of Arts and Crafts (College of Applied Arts)2. The former is now the main building for the present-day Bauhaus University, and the latter now houses Bauhaus University’s Faculty of Design. In 1996, these two buildings formed a part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site (WHS) listing and designation for Bauhaus sites in Weimar and Dessau.

1 Grossherzoglich-Sächsische Kunstschule Weimar.
2 Grossherzoglich-Sächsische Kunstgewerbeschule Weimar, “Winkelbau”.

Central staircase, Uni-Hauptgebaeude, Bauhaus Universitaet, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com

Central elliptical staircase with Auguste Rodin statue “Eva”: Uni-Hauptgebäude (University main building).

Central staircase, Uni-Hauptgebaeude, Bauhaus Universitaet, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com

Central elliptical staircase with Rodin’s “Eva” on the ground floor: Uni-Hauptgebäude.

Central staircase, Uni-Hauptgebaeude, Bauhaus Universitaet, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com

Rear, Uni-Hauptgebäude.

Uni-Hauptgebäude, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Thüringen, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage, Weltkulturerbe, fotoeins.com

“Dreieck” (Triangle), by Herbert Bayer. Side stairwell, Uni-Hauptgebäude.

Uni-Hauptgebäude, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Thüringen, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage, Weltkulturerbe, fotoeins.com

“Quadrat” (Square), by Herbert Bayer. Side stairwell, Uni-Hauptgebäude.

Uni-Hauptgebäude, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Thüringen, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage, Weltkulturerbe, fotoeins.com

“Kreis” (Circle), by Herbert Bayer. Side stairwell, Uni-Hauptgebäude.

Van-de-Velde building, Bauhaus Universitaet, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com

Van-de-Velde building.
Oskar Schlemmer, Van-de-Velde building, former school of arts and crafts, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Thüringen, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage, fotoeins.com

Piece by Oskar Schlemmer: front entrance, Van-de-Velde building.

Oskar Schlemmer, Van-de-Velde building, former school of arts and crafts, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Thüringen, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage, fotoeins.com

Piece by Oskar Schlemmer: front entrance, Van-de-Velde building.

Van-de-Velde building, Bauhaus Universitaet, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com
“Der kleinstmögliche Eingriff” (The smallest possible intervention). Ground floor stairwell: Van-de-Velde building.

Van-de-Velde building, Bauhaus Universitaet, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com

Reconstructed frieze of figures by Oskar Schlemmer: upper floor stairwell, Van-de-Velde building.

Van-de-Velde building, Bauhaus Universitaet, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com

Faculty of Design, Bauhaus University, Van-de-Velde Building, south wing.

Lehrstuhl - Leerer Stuhl, Hermann Bigelmayr, Bauhaus University, Weimar, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Lehrstuhl – leerer Stuhl”, by Hermann Bigelmayr (2005). The sculpture’s title is a pun: for an academic ‘chair’ or posting representing the university’s teaching goals; and for an empty seat in the lecture hall, waiting to be occupied. The sculpture stands across from the university library.

More info

including the Haus am Horn, and the Bauhaus Museum …

•   Weimar listing to Bauhaus Sites
•   UNESCO World Heritage Site listing
•   UNESCO Welterbe Germany, in English
•   Bauhaus Online
•   A warning: how the “degenerate art” label might still be used against present-day art


Click on the arrow-window icon at the upper-left corner in the map below for an explanation of the map symbols.

I’m very grateful to Weimar Tourism, Thüringen Tourismus, Germany National Tourism Board for access to places and activities in the city; and to Dorint Hotel am Goethepark for a comfortable and welcoming stay. Special thanks to Renée Cieraad for the guided tour, and Anja Friedrich from Weimar Tourismus for the warm hospitality. I made these photos on 29 and 30 April 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com at http://wp.me/p1BIdT-76F.

6 Responses to “Weimar UNESCO WHS: Bauhaus Old and New”

    • fotoeins

      Thanks, Cornelia, for reading and for your comment. There’s a lot to see and learn in the “middle of Germany”!

      Like

    • fotoeins

      Hi, Timo. I now must visit the Bauhaus sites in Dessau and Berlin! I had no expectations except for historical significance, but I very much enjoyed my time in both Erfurt and Weimar. I would like to go back again, especially to Eisenach and Jena.

      Liked by 1 person

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