Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between 🇨🇦 and 🇩🇪

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Face(s) in the Crowd: 10 World Cities

Above/featured: “A-Maze-ing Laughter” by Yue Minjun: Vancouver, Canada – 27 September 2014 (HL).

I’m completely in my element within the urban setting. Under a cloak of anonymity, the diversity of people from one city to the next is a real standout. When something or someone comes across my field of view, it’s with constant gaze and steady hands to sight, compose, and make the exposure. Opportunity and fortune converge with some favours when I find face(s) in crowds and observe the “oscillation between conformity and individualism”.

Here are 10 examples:

  1. Berlin, Germany
  2. Buenos Aires, Argentina
  3. Cape Town, South Africa
  4. Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  5. Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  6. Hong Kong
  7. México City, México
  8. Munich, Germany
  9. Prague, Czech Republic
  10. Sydney, Australia

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Fotoeins Friday: Skiing near Germany’s southernmost town

The Bavarian mountain and hiking town of Oberstdorf is the southernmost in Germany. After a short bus ride from the town centre, you reach the valley station for the Fellhorn cable car. Fellhorn mountain is located near the Austrian-German border where the German federal state of Bavaria bumps up against Austria and the federal state of Vorarlberg. After disembarking the cable car near the summit (at 1967 metres or 6453 feet above sea level), you can ski along the Austria-German frontier into Austria in winter, or walk the trails along the frontier ridge in summer. The picture above is the view facing east from the summit station of the cable car. Skiers and snowboarders find fresh powder everywhere on the slopes of Fellhorn, even in the area near the support pylons for the cable car.


I made the picture above on 8 March 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 lens, and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/22, ISO1000, and 35mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aMn.

Black Strathcona, Strathcona, Black History Month, East Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, fotoeins.com

My Vancouver: Jimi Hendrix’s grandma and Black Strathcona

Above/featured: Hogan’s Alley: Main St. at Union St.

When a wae lad was I, I viewed Vancouver’s Strathcona neighbourhood through the various lenses of my parents, the people on our block, and the surrounding community. That is, I viewed the area as primarily Chinese, in school and on the streets.

As an important teacher, history can often be painful. But an important and unspoken responsibility as city resident and national citizen is recognition and acknowledgement of these past lessons. I learned years later about the destruction of the African-Canadian community with the construction of the Viaduct, which not coincidentally almost eliminated Chinatown. The Viaduct is a remnant of the planned 1960s highway project in the city of Vancouver, but final removal of the viaduct is coming in the next few years.

February as Black History Month has been officially recognized in Canada since 1995. To honour the rich history by African Canadians in the province, British Columbia has also officially recognized Black History Month.

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Fotoeins Friday: Am Quicken im Schnee (Mittenwald)

The town of Klais has over one thousand years of history. That’s not obvious looking out from the train passing through between Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Mittenwald. But within easy reach on foot are the ruins of the Scharnitz monastery, the remnant of a Roman road, and open fields with views like the one above to Wettersteinspitzen.

(The approach on foot in winter is possible on groomed paths from Mittenwald or from Klais itself.)

I made the picture above on 1 March 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/20, ISO1000, 47mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aMa.

Fasching, Maschkera, Oimrausch: pre-Lent shenanigans in southern Germany

This ain’t no Hallowe’en*.

This is Fasching and Maschkera in southern Germany. It’s also about about distinctions and differences by comparison with Karneval on the Rhein.

Festivities take place before Catholic Lent, and the key idea behind the wild colourful costumes and wooden masks is the very pagan origin and ritual of driving out or driving away evil spirits of winter lurking inside people and their homes and welcoming the friendly spirits of spring for a productive growing season.

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