Fotoeins Fotografie

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Fotoeins Friday: Family outing at North Bondi (Sydney)

This post is the third of five Fotoeins Fridays in June, all from Australia’s most populous city, Sydney.

I found myself at North Bondi at various times; there are fewer people, a larger fraction of residents out and about, and the wave action is much stronger against the rocky cliffs and outcrops on the shoreline. A young family was on a stroll as mum showed her son examples of ocean life with their faithful dog darting in and out of the way. Fortunately, I managed to snap a frame where little biped and little quad both looked down into the fissure at the geographic feature called Flat Rock.

I made the photo above on 28 March 2013 with the Canon 450D, 70-300 glass, and settings: 1/320-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 180mm focal length (288mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie on fotoeins.com at https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bCm.

Erwin Schroedinger, Annemarie Schroedinger, Alpbach Cemetery, Heiliger Oswald, Pfarrkirche Alpbach, Alpbach, Tirol, Tyrol, Austria, fotoeins.com

Finding Erwin Schrödinger

Localizing his final wavefunction, at rest in Alpbach

It took a little effort: a train out from Innsbruck to Brixlegg, followed by a regional bus into another valley of countless valleys, accompanied by the illumination of sharp morning light, in a blanket of meadows and buttercups, under a deep ocean of impossibly blue skies. And on both sides of this river valley are an endless series of mountains, these peaks the smaller cousins to larger Austrian Alps nearby.

In Alpbach, the weekday morning is quiet, as the town begins to stir with people starting their work day. The bank has just opened, fresh baked bread and pastry and roasted coffee emanate from the cafe from around the corner, a couple of trucks rumble into town with deliveries. An older couple walks by, and there are mutual sunny greets of “Grüss Gott”. The church steeple glows yellow at this hour, and it’s easy to imagine with its bell the church is an aural and visual beacon for miles.

I’m drawn to the church because that was always the plan, to look for someone who’s buried in the church cemetery. Ordered rows of headstones lie as you would expect, but by the northwest gate, I find a single plaque on the bordering stone wall. The plaque reads: “Erwin Schrödinger, Nobelpreis für Physik, 1933”, and next to the plaque is Erwin and Annemarie Schrödinger’s final resting spot. Another academic pilgrimage completed.

Erwin Schroedinger, Annemarie Schroedinger, Alpbach Cemetery, Heiliger Oswald, Pfarrkirche Alpbach, Alpbach, Tirol, Tyrol, Austria, fotoeins.com

1933 Nobel Prize in Physics

Erwin Schroedinger, Annemarie Schroedinger, Alpbach Cemetery, Heiliger Oswald, Pfarrkirche Alpbach, Alpbach, Tirol, Tyrol, Austria, fotoeins.com

Erwin and Annemarie

At the top is the generalized Schrödinger equation which was his breakthrough and one of his many contributions to the field of quantum mechanics in the early 20th-century. For the wave function, psi, of any physical system, the equation reads

i h-bar psi-dot equals H psi

with wavefunction psi (dependent on spatial= and time-coordinates), time-derivative psi-dot, Hamiltonian operator H, and constants i and h-bar. What Newton’s 2nd Law (F = ma) is to classical mechanics, Schrödinger’s generalized equation applies to quantum mechanics. In fact, you can derive Newton’s 2nd Law from Schrödinger’s equation, which I did decades ago as a university student, blowing away my young little brain. The white dot above the second “psi” at the right was clearly a mistake during construction; the subsequent attempt to amend the mistake is almost a distraction on its own.

I chat with two people: the woman working the counter at the Tappeiner bakery, and a man who leads guided walks of the area. In both cases, I forgot to ask one key question: do they know the Schrödinger family? Turns out his daughter lives here in town, and their granddaughter’s family comes in regularly from Vienna.

That’s for next time, because I leave for Innsbruck before the morning is out. This beautiful town has extended its beautiful claws, and I realize now I have to come back to Alpbach.

I made the photos on 14 May 2018. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bS9.

Fotoeins Friday: Parbury Lane at Dawes Point (Sydney)

This post is the second of five Fotoeins Fridays in June, all from Australia’s most populous city, Sydney.

In one of the oldest sections of the city, I wander over to the Clifftop Walk and to Parbury Lane with a view to Piers 1 to 3 in Walsh Bay and the city landmark that is the Harbour Bridge. There are few people around, save for the occasional resident running errands or poked their head out the door to say ‘hello’. At the southern foot of the Harbour Bridge, the small peninsula is divided roughly east-west into The Rocks and Dawes Point, respectively.

I made the photo above on 16 March 2013 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-glass, and settings: 1/500-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie on fotoeins.com at https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bCf.

Fotoeins Friday: metro dash, afternoon rush in Sydney’s CBD

This post is the first of five Fotoeins Fridays in June, all from Australia’s most populous city, Sydney.

On my second visit to Sydney, I’ve been slowly walking the streets of the city’s CBD (central business district or downtown area). It’s been warm here with temperatures in the low +20s C (70s F) during the first week of spring. I’ve just departed the Museum of Sydney and when I’ve reached Australia Square, the sun is setting directly in front of me at Curtin Place. With manual settings to the smallest aperture and long exposures, I raise my camera as a city bus races down the street.

I made the photo above on 29 September 2010 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-glass, and the following settings: 3-sec, f/29, ISO800, and 49mm focal length (78mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-5qZ.

My Hamburg: Chilehaus in the Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO WHS

On 5 July 2015, UNESCO awarded World Heritage status to two sites in Hamburg: the Speicherstadt (Warehouse District) and the Kontorhausviertel (Office Building District). In the latter are two important brick buildings: Chilehaus and the Sprinkenhof, representative of the construction in the late 19th- and early 20th-century.

The Chilehaus was built by Fritz Höger for client Henry Sloman from 1922 to 1924 in the Kontorhausviertel as a prime example of German expressionist architecture using hard-fired brick. Höger undertook the project for Hamburg merchant and banker Sloman who made his fortune in importing nitrates from Chile. Built entirely to serve and complement the functions of the warehouses in neighbouring Speicherstadt, the Kontorhausviertel was the first dedicated office- and commercial-district on the European continent.


Sprinkenhof, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Sprinkenhof

Sprinkenhof, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Sprinkenhof

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, northwest corner: Niedernstrasse at Depenau

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, southwest corner: Pumpen at Messberg

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, east ‘prow’: Burchardstrasse

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, up the ‘prow’

Kontorhausviertel at night, Chilehaus, Sprinkenhof, UNESCO, World Heritage, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Kontorhausviertel at night (on Burchardstrasse)


(Click on the arrow-window icon at the upper-left corner of the map below for an explanation of the map symbols.)

I made the photos above on 26 June 2010 and 3 December 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie on fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-biH.

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