Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Fotoeins Friday in Austrian Tyrol: over the state capital

Innsbruck’s north perimeter is bounded by the rock wall that is the Northern Chain mountains or Nordkette. Fortunately, a combination of funicular and cable car is easily accessible in the city to all who wish to reach the Hafelekar summit on the Nordkette. At an elevation of about 2300 metres (7546 feet) above sea level, there’s a sweeping south view over Innsbruck city, Inn river valley, Bergiselschanze (Bergisel ski jump), Europabrücke (Europe bridge), and the mountains beyond.

I made the photo above on 10 May 2018 with a Canon EOS6D mark1 with the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/16, ISO500, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-leL.

Artificial light (LAPC)

Above/featured: Shantung St. at Portland St., in Mong Kok, Kowloon: Hong Kong – 12 Jun 2012 (450D).

Like many, my preference in photography is for as much natural light as possible. However, there are always exceptions, and a big one is the introduction and/or necessity of artificial light within a scene or picture. Over the course of my photographic journey, I’ve come across some wonderful examples of artificial lighting. I hope you enjoy the examples I’ve provided below, including (my love of) neon signage.

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Fotoeins Friday in Austrian Tyrol: Jägerwirt in Wilder Kaiser

Located about 1 km north of the town of Scheffau, the Jägerwirt vacation guesthouse and accompanying restaurant sit at the western foot of the Wilder Kaiser mountain range. The image shows a north-facing view of the lodge framed by a big stone vertical wall with peaks Kopfkraxen (2180 m), Sonneck (2260 m), Treffauer (2306 m), and Tuxeck (2226 m). The motto here is “Genuss mit Weitblick” (enjoyment with vision), and the soothing view from altitude goes well with cold beer and a massive Schnitzel to end a good visit and day-trip to the Wilder Kaiser region.

I made the photo above on 13 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/16, ISO1000, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-leA.

The wide field (LAPC)

Above/featured: Vancouver landmark: two towers of the Lions Gate Bridge – 17 Jan 2014 (6D1).

Some time ago, I wrote about my photographic journey which has included a point-and-shoot camera, an introductory crop-frame camera, a consumer-model full-frame camera, and a compact mirrorless camera.

The way people see the world is best encapsulated at focal lengths typically around 35mm. Portraits of people start at about 50mm, and go as “long” or “tight” at 80mm. With larger zoom glass and longer focal lengths, “action at a distance” becomes accessible; examples include “close-up” views or moments at sports events or bird-watching from afar to avoid spooking the birds. At focal lengths below 35mm, the accessible field of view becomes much larger; for example, one of the “widest” fields can be found with a super-wide piece of glass at around 16mm.

I’ve made photographs across a wide variety of focal lengths: from wide (16mm) to long (480mm). I once imagined I would spend most of my time photographing “long”, at focal lengths beyond 100mm. I soon learned I prefer photographing (well-)below 50mm, with the lion’s share of my images in the “wide field” at focal lengths in the range 24 to 28mm.

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My Salzburg: city views from above on Mönchsberg

In Salzburg, I’m motivated by a search for Mozart and for signs of modernity. I’ve already examined part of the city through its art: what more can Salzburg offer?

Excellent views of the city and surroundings.

The Mönchberg hill on which the Hohensalzburg fortress sits provides many viewpoints over the city. You can walk along the entire length of Mönchberg for varying perspectives, or you can approach a number of the viewpoints separately.

I ascended and traversed the hill on foot from southeast to northeast, beginning from Kapitelplatz to the viewpoints just north of the Museum der Moderne. I returned to the Old Town below with the MönchsbergAufzug elevator which is a part of Salzburg’s public transport.


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