Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Small towns in the American Southwest (LAPC 64)

Above/featured: I-17 Sunset Point Rest Stop, near ghost town of Bumble Bee: Black Canyon City, AZ – 17 Oct 2018 (X70).

A memorable road trip through the American Southwest included over three-thousand miles of driving through Arizona (AZ) and New Mexico (NM). We encountered many small towns: some of them were easy to pass through, while others were “must see”. We wanted to stop in as many as we could, but time and itinerary were as always the usual culprits. Guess we’ll have to return.

For the following ten towns we stopped or pass through, I gathered population estimates online from Wikipedia and/or the US Census, and I’ve rounded the numbers to the “nearest 50”.

  • Abiquiú, NM: about 250 people
  • Bitter Springs, AZ: about 400 people
  • Continental Divide, AZ: about 500 people
  • Magdalena, NM: about 900 people
  • Marble Canyon, AZ: about 400 people
  • Pie Town, NM: about 200 people
  • Quemado, NM: about 250 people
  • Show Low, AZ: about 11000 people
  • Springerville, AZ: about 2000 people
  • Taos Pueblo, NM: about 200 people

( Click here for images and more )

Fotoeins Friday on AZ US-60: Show Low

On US-60/AZ-77 in Arizona, on our day-long drive from Tucson, AZ to Santa Fe, NM.

We’d already seen highway signs marking down the distance on our approach to the town of Show Low (founded 1870). As we drive through, we stop at a traffic light and discover we’re on “Deuce of Clubs Avenue.” That’s not exactly coincidence; sure enough, the name of the town and the name of the “main street” are all due to a high-stakes game of cards. In a game of the “lowest card”, the deuce of clubs is said to have won the game. We don’t have time to stop in town to explore the story some more; we’ll have to come back.

It’s also here in Show Low where shared highway AZ-77 and US-60 part ways. With AZ-77 continuing north to Holbrook, we’re on US-60 east to Springerville.

I made the picture above on 19 October 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/500-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-eEL.

Worms’ Holy Sand: Europe’s oldest surviving Jewish cemetery

I’m looking for a “thousand-year history” in the city of Worms located in southwest Germany. This has nothing to do helminthology or nematology, as the town’s name is derived from “Warmaisa”, the former Jewish name of the city. This is about an important part of Jewish-German history and peaceful coexistence of the Judeo-Christian communities within Europe. The town’s fame and reputation is also partly derived from Martin Luther; I’ve already visited the site where Luther was on trial to answer charges of heresy, as well as the world’s largest Reformation monument.

This part of the Rhein river area is considered the “cradle of European Jewry”, known also as “little Jerusalem on the Rhine.” In medieval times, flourishing Jewish communities in the cathedral cities of Speyer, Worms, and Mainz facilitated the creation of a common Jewish league with the name ShUM (SchUM), spelled out by the first letters of the Hebrew names for the three cities. To emphasize the influence of Jewish heritage in Europe and to continue the ongoing process of preservation and education, the recent application by Germany for the ShUM cities to be inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site is at present in the Tentative list (2019).

On a breezy late-autumn afternoon, light fades quick, casting solemn shadows on this ground. In the town’s old Jewish cemetery, I’m the only person present, and I’ve placed a small stone on top of a number of gravestones. I’m surrounded by apparitions over an millennium’s age and by the remaining physical traces in various shapes, stones, and size.

( Click here for images and more )

Fotoeins Friday on AZ US-60: Salt River Canyon

On US-60/AZ-77 in Arizona, on our day-long drive from Tucson, AZ to Santa Fe, NM.

About halfway between Globe and Show Low is the very scenic Salt River Canyon Rest Area. It’s a great place to stretch the legs, descend to the river canyon below, or walk across the 1934 bridge which is now only for pedestrian use. The replacement New Salt River Canyon Bridge (Apache Bridge) opened in 1996. The river and rest area lie on the territorial lands of the San Carlos Apache and the White Mountain Apache peoples. The Salt River flows west and converges downstream with the Gila river in southwest Phoenix.

I made the picture above on 19 October 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/1000-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-eEz.

Munich, street photography, Pxhere, CC-BY-2.0

Photographers Frank, Herzog, Lindbergh: their work and legacy

Above/featured: Underpass in Munich, unnamed photographer (Pxhere CC-BY-2.0).

In the past week have passed away three photographers: Robert Frank, Fred Herzog, and Peter Lindbergh. Their photographic work, stories, structure, and practice have provided important elements to my photography education. The following is a brief summary who they were, the work for which they’re best known, and examples of their images from Instagram and documentary videos from YouTube.

( Click here for more )

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