Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Public art in Vancouver (LAPC)

Above/featured: Left: “Search”, by J. Seward Johnson Jr. (1975). Right: “Solo”, by Natalie McHaffie (1986). Devonian Harbour Park, 14 Jul 2021 (X70).

Based on what we see in person and online, the quickest version of street art may be defined by the variety of art appearing on side walls of buildings, big and small. Most will think about paint, graffiti, and murals, all of them in the here and now. But we shouldn’t forget any art that’s out on the streets and publicly accessible.

Below are a handful of examples of public art in the city of Vancouver; the following is a visual expression of my fondness for sculpture whose origins sweep back to the 1st-half of the 20th-century.

  • “A Tale of Two Children” by Ken Lum (2005)
  • “Golden Tree” by Douglas Coupland (2016); “Salish Gifts” by Susan Point (2015)
  • Lions by Charles Marega (1939)
  • “Reconciliation Pole” by 7idansuu / Edenshaw, James Hart (2017)
  • “Salmon” by Susan Point (1995)
  • “Saltwater City”, by Paul Wong (2020)
  • “Welcome Figure”, by Darren Yelton (2006)

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Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, three

Civilization, before colonization

On 18 June 2018, the City of Vancouver changed the name of the north plaza at the Vancouver Art Gallery:

•   šxʷƛ̓ənəq in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people.
•   Xwtl’e7énḵ in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people.

Both words mean “a place for (cultural) gathering or ceremony.”

The correct pronunciation for these names can be found on YouTube.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 29 May 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/13, ISO800, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lf4.

Ordinary rejects

Above/featured: Night glow on a black tub-chair at a bus stop – 7 Oct 2021.

The intersection between modernity and ordinary is extraordinary in its vast reach, covering all corners of the planet by land, sea, and air. Consider what we have in our homes, and how much or little of it will get recycled. We might pause to consider how a piece of furniture lives or is used by a family; how they must have once been excited to buy chairs, couches, and beds, only to throw them out when they were deemed surplus to requirements, how much is tossed out in a regular or periodic “clean out” and/or in the process of moving out from a residence.

Below are images of abandoned items, whose likely destination is the dump.

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Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, two

Civilization, before colonization

On 18 June 2018, the City of Vancouver changed the name of the front or north plaza at Queen Elizabeth Theatre:

•   šxʷƛ̓exən in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people, meaning “place where people are invited”.
•   Xwtl’a7shn in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people, meaning “place where people are invited to celebrate”.

The correct pronunciation for these names can be found on YouTube.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 8 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/14, ISO1250, and 18.5mm, 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lf0.

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, one

Civilization, before colonization

Over what is presently called First Narrows is this view southeast towards the green peninsula called Stanley Park, adjacent to Vancouver’s West End and the city centre. On display are various locations in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh languages for the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples. The waters of Burrard Inlet are known as səl̓ilw̓ət (“inlet”), from which Tsleil-Waututh is derived and whose name means “People of the inlet.”

I assembled place-names from Musqueam Place Names Map and Squamish Atlas; and from printed sources by Carson et al., Macdonald, Matthews, Suttles, and Waite.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 10 July 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/10, ISO1000, 14mm (21mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-leR.

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