Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Fotoeins Friday: A Muslim, a Christian, and a Jew visiting friends

Israeli artist Eran Shakine explores the similarities and differences among three world religions Islam, Christianity, and Judaism. With “A Muslim, A Christian, and A Jew,” the title of his exhibition plays on the first line of a joke which draws on stereotypes, and with his drawings, Shakine has a Muslim, a Christian, and a Jew – outwardly indistinguishable – explore the world.

The blurb above was paraphrased from the description at the Jüdisches Museum München (Jewish Museum Munich). Shakine’s clever insightful work was on display at the museum from 21 February to 21 October 2018.

Here is a selection of Shakine’s work for this month:

•   6 December: M,C,J visiting some friends.
•   13 December: M,C,J one afternoon in the North Pacific.
•   20 December: M,C,J realize they don’t have to know everything.
•   27 December: M,C,J decide to live on critical thinking and hope.

I made the photo above on 2 June 2018 with a Fujifilm X70. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-dX9.

1-dayer in the American Southwest (2): Taos area

Above/feature: In the background at right-centre is the sacred Pueblo Peak (Taos Mountain) with a light dusting of autumn snow.

The following takes place entirely within day 7 of our time and drive through the American Southwest.

In a daylong trip from Santa Fe, we’re in Taos for the first time where we meet with nature photographer Jim O’Donnell, whose writings also appear locally in The Taos News. We also marvel in the hamlet of Embudo the collection of paraphernalia associated with American automobile culture at the Classic Gas Museum.

Our drive is on the Low Road in both directions. It’s no real surprise we’re in the Taos area longer than anticipated, but we leave the area a little earlier to catch a couple of sights back in Santa Fe as we must depart the following day for Arizona. It’s curse and benefit, wanting (or needing) to stay in one place for an extended duration with the anticipation of a return, because there’s much more to see and learn.

( Click here for images and more )

Festival of Lights, Potsdamer Platz, Mauerfall, Berliner Mauer, Berlin Wall, Fall of the Wall, Berlin, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 5 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

With the annual Festival of Lights casting colour and patterns, I’m standing next to the first ever traffic signal in Germany (1924), just out of view to the left. What’s highlighted is a stripe on the pavement through the centre of the frame, with the camera view south to the south entrance to Potsdamer Platz train station. The imbedded brick stripe marks the former location of the “Vorderlandmauer“, the forward or boundary wall immediately next to West Berlin). Left of the stripe would have been East Berlin; to the right, West Berlin.

I made the image above on 14 October 2017 with a Canon 6D mark 1 and the following settings: 1/50-sec, f/4, ISO10000, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-fdf.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is to the left of the red line, and East Berlin is to the right of the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Potsdamer Platz, Berlin.de

Berliner Mauer, Potsdamer Platz: berlin.de.

Macy's, Bon Marche building, The Bon, Thanksgiving, holiday star, Seattle, Washington, USA, fotoeins.com

Seattle: Thanksgiving holiday star & fireworks

As a wae lad, I was fascinated by comparative branding and marketing, and that’s how I got to thinking about the differences and similarities between Canada’s Hudson’s Bay Company in greater Vancouver and the American Bon Marché in Bellingham and Seattle. But I don’t ever recall a tradition of lighting a star for October/Canadian Thanksgiving.

In downtown Seattle, a grand building opened in 1929 for the locally-owned Bon Marché department store, operating for over 7 decades until “The Bon” became Macy’s in 2005. A holiday star designed by Bob James in 1957 would become a fixture for the city and her residents. In September 2019, Macy’s declared the downtown Seattle location would be closing at the end of February 2020. At the time, the announcement included no plans for lighting the holiday star.

However, the star looks to be coming back for one more (final?) illumination, as a local lighting company agreed to refurbish and reassemble the star in time for the 2019 Thanksgiving season. Festivities occur Friday November 29, beginning with the annual Thanksgiving parade followed by the star’s lighting and fireworks.

•   MyNorthwest, 27 Nov 2019.

( Click here for images and more )

Nordbahnhof, Bernauer Strasse, Mauerfall, Berliner Mauer, Berlin Wall, Fall of the Wall, Berlin, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 4 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

Facing south, corner of Julie-Wolfthorn-Strasse and Gartenstrasse:

The brick and metal stripe in the pavement lies between S-Bahn station Nordbahnhof (green “S”) and the Visitor Centre for the Berlin Wall Memorial at Bernauer Strasse (beyond the image frame). East- and West-Berlin would have been on the left and right of the stripe, respectively. The stripe delineates the path of the former Berlin Wall which divided the city and represented a sort of “landmark” and “status quo” for the Cold War over a 28-year period between 1961 and 1989. Construction of the Berlin Wall began quietly and without warning just after midnight on 13 August 1961. The Wall fell 28 years later on 9 November 1989.

I made the image above on 6 December 2014 with a Canon 6D mark1 and the following settings: 1/200-sec, f/9, ISO2000, and 28mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-fdE.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is above the red line, and East Berlin is below the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Nordbahnhof, Berlin.de

Berliner Mauer, Nordbahnhof: berlin.de.

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