Fotoeins Fotografie

my looks, of place & home

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty-six

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

9 September 2012.

In Canberra, I’m visiting a family whom I got to know when we lived and worked in La Serena, Chile. They’ve moved to Canberra, and I’m visiting them two-thirds of the way into my “year-around.”

It’s a calm beautiful late-winter afternoon, and we’re all on an hour-long boat trip around Lake Burley Griffin. In this image, we’re facing southwest to Commonwealth Place with over 100 flags representing nations with diplomatic presence in the Australian national capital. Behind Commonwealth Place are the Old Parliament House and the flagpole on top of the current Parliament House on Capital Hill.

I made the image on 9 Sep 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/640-sec, f/8, ISO200, 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-msb.

My Vienna: Beethovenhaus Heuriger Mayer am Pfarrplatz

Above/featured: “Beethovenhaus” Heuriger Mayer am Pfarrplatz. Pfarrplatz square, Heiligenstadt, in Vienna Döbling (19.)

26 May 2022.

It’s a nation-wide holiday on the 26th of May (2022): Ascension of Christ (Christi Himmelfahrt). On a bright and warm late-spring day, people are out and about, and very few shops are open.

I’m halfway through my month-long stay in Vienna, and today, I’m in the city’s 19th district, Döbling, where in his time Beethoven spent many summers resting, composing, and contemplating life with total hearing loss. I’ve spent the morning wandering through the Heiligenstadt neighbourhood, including a visit to one of his summer residences that’s now a museum dedicated to Beethoven. Not far down the street is another Beethoven summer house that’s now a wine tavern or “Heuriger”. A hanging bunch of pine branches at the front door means this tavern is open for service, with food and their own wine on offer.

The Austrian capital city is home to the world’s largest “urban vineyard” and is the world’s only capital city producing wine within its city limits. There are some 600 wine producers; 400 individual vineyards; over 7 million square metres (75 million square feet) of cultivation space producing both white and red wines in a 80/20 split, respectively; and an average annual yield of 2 million litres or over 2.5 million bottles of wine. Most of the wine is sold for immediate consumption at wine shops and grocery stores, and at the city’s many wine taverns.

1pm on a holiday is going to be busy, and most tables in shade in the outdoor patio are occupied. I don’t intend to linger; so, I take an open spot under sun. A waiter comes by and asks if there’s something I’d like to drink. I request an “Achtel” (“eighth”, 125mL) of Mayer’s own 2021 Grüner Veltliner, and ask whether’s a buffet today. The food counters are around the corner, he replies, handing me a slip of paper with my assigned-table number. I can pay for the food upon ordering at the counter, or I can pay when I’m done. Inside, there’s the unmistakable glow and refrigerated chill of the food counters. There are salads of the German/Austrian kind (no much of the green leafy kind, though); pickles and Sauerkraut; fatty, meaty, cheesy spreads for bread; the “usual suspects” including pan-fried potatoes, roast-pork and -chicken, sausage, blood sausage; cold cuts and cheeses; and naturally, a dessert display.

I’m not gonna eat too much or fill up on carbs on this very warm afternoon. Keeping it simple, I’ve a tomato and onion salad, to go with a pork Bratwurst, a meat patty (Faschierte Laibchen/Frikadellen), and a big juicy slice of caraway-roasted pork (Kummelbraten). Staff behind the counter ask if I want “Saft” (gravy/juices) with the meat choices. “Ja, bitte!

The tomato and onion mix is a little sweet and sour. This along with the smooth yet sharpness of the wine provide a lighter taste balance to the “heavier” meat portions. The Bratwurst and meat patty are very good, but the Kummelbraten. Oh, the Kummelbraten. The outside is crunchy-chewy (knackig), and the pork is juicy (saftig) and delicious (gewürzt). It’s a style of old-fashioned cooking my parents would have recognized and enjoyed.

The tavern provides a cozy setting. People are shuttling between their tables and the food counters, and there’s a happy murmur to the conversations around me. The young and old fill up tables in both front- and back-garden seating areas. In my view, it’s a pricey meal for one person; yet, I was tempted by the Cremeschnitte on display. However, I also think sharing a variety of food and splitting a bottle of their white vine among a group of people would be a fun spread for an afternoon or evening.


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Melbourne Cricket Ground, MCG, The G, Australian Football League, AFL, footy, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty-five

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

30 August 2012.

One of the greatest cathedrals in sport resides deep in the southern hemisphere.

Known throughout Australia and with much of the international sporting community, the Melbourne Cricket Ground is also known as the MCG, or more simply as “The G.” I’m on a guided tour of this massive sporting theatre whose capacity is 100-thousand people. Constructed in 1853, the G today is the largest stadium in the Southern Hemisphere and the 10th largest in the world.

I’m learning about the storied history of cricket at this venue. There’s no cricket in winter, and today there are four goal posts set up at each end of the oval field, as on-field preparations continue for tomorrow’s “footy” match between Hawthorn Hawks and West Coast Eagles in the 23rd and final round of the 2012 Australian Football League (AFL) Premiership season. At field-level, it’s easy to get lost within the expanse of the field and following the steady rise of the stands. A very fond wish is to come back inside the G and sit in the stands during the first week of summer, and witness live at least one day of the annual Boxing Day Test.

With the sudden passing of legendary Australia cricketer Shane Warne in March 2022, the Great Southern Stand at the MCG will be renamed the S.K. Warne Stand.

I made the image on 30 Aug 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/250-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-moy.

Hanson Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, Kangaroo Island, South Australia, Australia

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty-four

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

25 August 2012.

The Hanson Bay Wildlife Sanctuary lies in the southwest corner of Kangaroo Island in the Australian state of South Australia (SA). The sanctuary is home to a lot of mammalian marsupials, including kangaroos and koalas. With a long lens, the image above shows a koala mum in the trees. Her “joey” is just visible and tucked underneath at the 9-o’clock position (relative to the viewer). Emanating from the mammalian bipeds below are excited whispers of “look there!” and “awwwwwww!”

I made the image on 25 Aug 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/500-sec, f/5.6, ISO200, and 250mm focal length (400mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-moz.

New Zealand fur seal, seal pup, Admirals Arch, Cape du Couedic, Flinders Chase National Park, Kangaroo Island, South Australia, Australia, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty-three

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

25 August 2012.

We’ve hopped on a ferry from mainland South Australia to Kangaroo Island. In the island’s southwest corner is an arch-shaped formation called Admiral’s Arch; from here, it’s over 3000 kilometres of open water to the Antarctic coast. Although rocks here are pounded by wave-action from the waters of the South Pacific, New Zealand fur seals and their pups are present in an out-of-bounds area set aside as a safe breeding area. This is where long-glass (zoom-lens) is handy, but from a very safe distance.

I made the image on 25 Aug 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/160-sec, f/5.6, ISO100, and 300mm focal length (480mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mkR.

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