Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of home & place

Fotoeins Friday in the Munich Metro: Georg-Brauchle-Ring

I highlight the interiors of four U-Bahn metro stations in Munich, Germany:

6 November – Georg-Brauchle-Ring,
13 November – Lehel,
20 November – Marienplatz, and
27 November – Westfriedhof.

The above is a shot of the weekday morning 7am commute at Georg-Brauchle-Ring station which serves U-Bahn lines U1 and U7. I used this station to visit the ruins of the Olympiastadion ghost station and memorials to the massacre at the 1972 Summer Olympics.

I made the above picture on 21 February 2017 (IG) with a Canon EOS6D mark1 and the following settings: 1-sec, f/22, 1SO500, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ilk.

1-day drive in the US Southwest: Tucson to Santa Fe

Above/featured: Northeast on US-60/AZ-77, through the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, just outside of Show Low, AZ.

The following takes place entirely on the 15th and final day of our drive through the American Southwest. Departing Tucson, Arizona, we headed north and east on AZ-77, US-60, and I-25 into New Mexico for our destination in Santa Fe, New Mexico. We drove through a variety of landscapes in east-central Arizona and west-central New Mexico for a total of 856 kilometres (532 miles).


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El Rancho Hotel, Gallup, New Mexico, US 66, US route 66, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Hotel El Rancho

(October 2018.)

On our 1-day drive from Santa Fe west to Flagstaff, we stopped in Gallup, New Mexico for a few hours. Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup was once a busy railway depot town big on coal, but now is a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway.

Hotel El Rancho exudes what we would call “an old-school charm with the nostalgia of driving culture.” (And for effect, we roll the r’s in Rrrrrrrancho.) Gallup lay along former highway US-66, which explains why the hotel was built in 1938 directly in front of the highway’s route through town. It’s one beaut of a throwback.

I made the two pictures on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-iA2.

El Rancho Hotel, Gallup, New Mexico, US 66, US route 66, USA, fotoeins.com

Main hotel lobby.

History of the Gallup Region, Lloyd Moylan, Federal Art Project, New Deal, McKinley County Courthouse, Gallup, New Mexico, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Moylan’s “New Deal” mural

(October 2018.)

On our 1-day drive from Santa Fe west to Flagstaff, we stopped in Gallup, New Mexico for a few hours. Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup was once a busy railway depot town big on coal, but now is a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway.

Next to the new county courthouse is the old county courthouse built in 1938. Itself a part of the New Deal Federal Arts Project (1935-1943), the old courthouse building housed a variety of other New Deal art works, including 10-foot murals by Lloyd Moylan up on the inside walls of the historic courtroom. Moylan’s murals “Allegory – History of the Region” show how people’s lives have changed through history of the area.

I made the picture above on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/125-sec, f/4, ISO4000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-izX.

My Vienna: Otto Wagner’s architectural legacy

Featured: On the Linke Wienzeile, opposite the Naschmarkt at right – 18 May 2018 (6D1).

What: The Post Savings Bank building and Steinhof church, by Otto Wagner.
Why: These two are the most important architectural examples of 20th-century modernism.
Where: Throughout the city of Vienna.

To visit Vienna is to know Otto Wagner. A first-time visitor to the city will be forgiven for not knowing about Wagner or his creations, but throughout their time spent in the Austrian capital, they’ll encounter Wagner’s early 20th-century “Modern Architecture”

Vienna is for many the city of Beethoven, Mozart, and Strauss; the city of historic and stylish cafés with coffee and Sacher Torte; the city whose pride is revealed in the combined World Heritage Site that are the classic period architecture within the Old Town and the beautiful palace and gardens at Schönbrunn. Flowing through the city is the Danube river, memorialized in Johann Strauss II’s “An der schönen blauen Donau” (The Blue Danube).

The evolution of architectural style is plainly evident throughout the city. Around the Ringstrasse (inner ring road) is architecture in the Historicism style, with big nods to Neoclassicism in the Parliament, Neo-Gothic in City Hall and the Votivkirche, and a lot of Neo-Renaissance represented by the City Theatre, Art History Museum, Natural History Museum, Opera House, and the University.

But as calendars flipped from 1899 to 1900, the fin-du-siècle heralded a move to bold thinking, different style, and a change in the way and reasons why buildings were put together. Consequently, Vienna is a city of 20th-century modernism whose traces are found in art, architecture, and urban planning. Even with post-war reconstruction in the mid-20th century and a mindful push for environmental rigour in the 21st-century, Vienna still remains in many ways Otto Wagner’s city.


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