Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story
A Tale of Two Children: A Work for Strathcona, Ken Lum, National Works Yard, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “A Tale of Two Children”, by Ken Lum

I’m highlighting this month Chinese-Canadian artist Ken Lum: born and raised in the western Canadian city of Vancouver; he began studying chemistry at university before switching completely to art. Today, not only does he continue to make art, but he also comments about the contemporary and historical nature of art and about how art and society continuously shapes and informs each other. All of Lum’s pieces featured this month are located outdoors and freely accessible to the public at zero cost.

In 2005, Lum completed a permanent work commissioned by the City of Vancouver for its public works yard on National Avenue. The work “A Tale of Two Children: A Work for Strathcona” is not only a nod to his formative years growing up in the Strathcona neighbourhood, but provides different views to children and their changing (and precipitous) views regarding self-worth within a society that’s already prejudged them.

I made the photo above on 1 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime (18.5/28mm). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lkF.

Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Salish Girl,” by Susan Point

On the Point Grey campus of the University of British Columbia stands the Reconciliation Pole, carved by Haida hereditary chief and master carver 7idansuu (Edenshaw), known also by James Hart. The pole was raised on 1 April 2017 in a grand ceremony.

Above the “residential school” are several standing figures holding each other’s hands; a young girl with a bright red tunic was carved by Susan Point. Their feet aren’t shown, representing the lack of grounding and abundance of abuse. A blight on the nation’s history, the Canadian government stole an estimated 150-thousand indigenous children from their families, forcing them into residential schools across the country. Countless people, family generations, and once intact regional cultures were systematically destroyed, amounting to a state-sanctioned program of cultural genocide.

The Reconciliation People is a small step in not only an admission of guilt, but a part of the forward-moving process of remembrance by Canadians and reconciliation between First Nations and the national government.

Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Digital crop of the image above.

I made the photo above on 22 Aug 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime with settings 1/280-sec, f/16, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kBS.

Palacio de Cibeles, Fuente de Cibeles, Plaza de Cibeles, Paseo del Prado, Madrid, Spain, España, fotoeins.com

Madrid: Paseo del Prado, new UNESCO WHS

Congratulations to Madrid and Spain!

In the Spanish capital city, the Paseo del Prado and the adjacent Parque del Retiro were inscribed together as a new UNESCO World Heritage Site on 25 July 2021. The Paseo del Prado is a wide tree-lined boulevard populated with big fountains, beautiful architecture, and buildings dedicated to scientific research and to collections of world-class art. As prototype to the Hispanic “alameda” found throughout Latin America towns and cities, Paseo del Prado is an display of vision and desire for an idyllic society within the (former) Spanish Empire.


Palacio de Cibeles, Fuente de Cibeles, Plaza de Cibeles, Paseo del Prado, Madrid, Spain, España, fotoeins.com

Plaza de Cibeles: Palacio de Cibeles (palace 1919); Fuente de Cibeles (fountain 1780, moved 1895).

Banco de España, Plaza de Cibeles, Paseo del Prado, Madrid, Spain, España, fotoeins.com

Plaza de Cibeles: Banco de España (1891).

Palacio de Linares, Casa América, Plaza de Cibeles, Paseo del Prado, Madrid, Spain, España, fotoeins.com

Plaza de Cibeles: Palacio de Linares (1877), host to Casa América.

Museo Nacional del Prado, Diego de Velázquez, Aniceto Marinas, Paseo del Prado, Madrid, Spain, España, fotoeins.com

Diego de Velázquez statue (1899) by sculptor Aniceto Marinas, in front of the Prado Museum (1819).


I made all images above on 9 May 2009 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lhx.

Susan Point, Fusion, Marpole, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Fusion,” by Susan Point

A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally. About her sculpture Point writes (City of Vancouver):

“Fusion” is an artwork that marries mediums and cultures … as well as legends. It also, metaphorically, fuses natural imagery with modern methods. The sculpture is contemporary yet unmistakably Salish. As this development sits in traditional Musqueam territory and is close to the banks of the Fraser River, my conceptual art piece is based on the theme of “people of the Grass” as well as the “Salmon People” which is uniquely Musqueam. The human element within the salmon has universal appeal that symbolically relates to all peoples. The faces are revealed with traditional Salish elements. Overall, the forms represent a living thriving culture and our historical legacy; as well as this unique community today … giving a sense of place and a landmark that respects the past, present and future.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJI.

Susan Point, Consonance, Mount Pleasant, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Consonance,” by Susan Point

A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally.

“… Point designed this pod of swimming whales. She said that the word ‘consonance’ implies harmony and agreement among the components or a dialogue or repeated sounds. Whales dominate legends that show the interconnectedness of all life and are used extensively in First Nations art. The artist also repeated a theme used in other art she has created: the need for respect and an obligation to care for the whales and each other.”

“Public Art in Vancouver: Angels Among Lions”, by John Steil and Aileen Stalker, 2009.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/8, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJE.

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