Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between Canada & Germany

Posts from the ‘UNESCO World Heritage’ category

World Heritage Sites designated and inscribed by UNESCO

Air Safaris, Southern Alps, Westland National Park, Aoraki Mount Cook National Park, South Island, New Zealand, fotoeins.com, myRTW

Fotoeins Friday: Aoraki-Horokoau flyby, New Zealand

21 July 2012.

Approximate location: -43.546433, 170.144492 (43°32’47.2″S 170°08’40.2″E)
Approximate altitude: 3000 metres (9850 feet)
View azimuth: 170 to 175 degrees (south-southeast)

We’re up among New Zealand’s Southern Alps as the flight takes us over Westland Tai Poutini National Park and Aoraki Mount Cook National Park. I’ve supplied featured labels to help with orientation in this southeast view. Despite scale, height, and distance, I get the distinct feeling that I can just about leap out of the plane to a soft snow landing or if I could reach out with my hand, I could touch the nation’s two tallest mountains, Aoraki (Mount Cook) and Horokoau (Mount Tasman), sacred to the Māori people.

A visual account of the circular flight over southwest New Zealand can be seen here. The west coast on the nation’s South Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1990.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 21 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/3200-sec, f/5, ISO200, and 33mm focal length (53mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9Zb.

Eisleben UNESCO WHS: Luther’s birth and death sites

Above (HL): Luther monument by Rudolf Simmering at Eisleben’s market square. The monument was inaugurated in 1883 to mark the quatercentenary of Luther’s birth year (1483). At left and upper-right are the Hotel Graf von Mansfeld and St. Andrew’s Church, respectively.

With a population over 25-thousand people, Eisleben is a quiet town in central Germany in the federal state of Saxony-Anhalt. But the South Harz region holds a special place in German and European history: Martin Luther came into the world in Eisleben in 1483, spent his childhood years in Mansfeld, and, on a trip home from Wittenberg to negotiate a local dispute in Mansfield, died in Eisleben in 1546. As shown in the map below, a number of important locations in Eisleben are associated with Luther and the Reformation, including the Luther monument in the town’s market square, St. Peter’s Church, St. Andrew’s Church, and St. Anne’s Church. Specifically, two sites in town constitute a part of the inscription for UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996: (1) the house where Luther was born, and (2) the museum on Luther’s death.


The house where Luther was born

Across the street from the city’s Tourist Information office is the museum about Martin Luther’s birth. Born in a 15th-century house at this location, his parents brought him down the street to St. Peter’s Church to have him baptized. One year later in 1484, the family moved to Mansfeld. The house where Luther was born was almost destroyed in the fire of 1689. The town subsequently took over the property and rebuilt the house in the original half-timbered style. By 1693 a public museum for pilgrims was inaugurated within the building. The Museum Luther’s Birth House is one of the oldest museums in a German-speaking country. The house had housed a school for needy children since 1693. Commissioned by Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm III in 1817, a new Luther school for the poor was built in the house’s courtyard, opening in 1819 to welcome over 100 children. The museum today includes exhibits about the Luther family, the medieval mining economy, Martin’s baptism, and the state of medieval Catholicism.

Luther’s Birth House
Address: Lutherstrasse 15.
Summer hours (1 April to 31 October): Daily, 1000h to 1800h.
Winter hours (1 November to 31 March): Tuesday to Sunday, 1000h to 1700h.
Admission fee: check here for single admission or combination admission.

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birth House, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Around Luther’s Birth House, 2016: Luthers Geburtshaus (Luther’s birth house), Lutherarmenschule (Luther school for the poor, 1817); Lutherarchiv (Luther Archive, 2016); Petrikirche Zentrum Taufe (St. Peter Church where Luther was baptized in 1483), now Baptism Centre. (HL)

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birth House, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Around Luther’s Birth House, c. 1830. Oil on canvas, by Carl Salomon Warmholz. I’ve added labels to compare this scene with the photo above. (Source)

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birth House, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

The Luder family. HL: Hans Luder (father), MLi: Margarete Lindemann (mother), ML: Martin Luther, KB: Katharina von Bora (wife). One year after Martin’s birth in Eisleben (EIL), the family moved to Mansfeld (MSH) in 1484. “The Luders are related by marriage to the Mansfeld county’s leading families, belonging to the class of wealthy master-smelters. Their sons can reach high positions in administration, university, and clergy due to their academic education and social class.” (HL)

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birth House, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

From Luder to Eleutherios and Luther: “In his early thirties, Martin changes his surname ‘Luder’ (also Lüder, derived from Lothar) into ‘Luther’ and begins signing his letters with ‘Eleutherios’. The Humanists’ custom at the time was a Latinization of names and Martin finds that his family name is related to the Greek word ‘eleutherios’ meaning ‘free’, which seems appropriate especially after publishing/announcing his 95 Theses in 1517.” At right is a copy of a 1579 copperplate engraving of Martin Luther with his doctor’s hat, by Johann Sadeler and Caspar Ruts after Lucas Cranach the Elder 1521. (HL)

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birth House, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Luther with swan, 18th-century copperplate engraving. (Source)

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birth House, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Transcription of letters by Luther and Phillip Melanchthon, 1544: “Luther loses two daughters who die young; he is especially distraught at losing 13-year old Magdalena who dies in his arms in 1542. Luther drafts the inscription on his daughter’s gravestone of which various versions have been handed down.” Sources: (1), pp.3373-3374; (2) pp.413; (3)

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birth House, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Museum Luthers Geburtshaus: entrance, with passage from Danish author Hans Christian Andersen who visited Eisleben in 1831. (HL)

Luthers Geburtshaus, Luther Birthhouse, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Old front entrance on Lutherstrasse: “In diesem Haus wurde geboren Dr. M. Luther den 10 November 1483. Gottes Wort ist Luthers Lehr, darum vergeht sie nimmer mehr. / Dr. Martin Luther was born in this house on 10 November 1483. Luther’s teachings is God’s Word which will never pass away.” (HL)


The museum about Luther’s death

With a short walk across town, you arrive at the museum about the house where Luther died (Museum Luthers Sterbehaus). Martin Luther arrived from Wittenberg in late-January 1546 to mediate a dispute among Mansfeld’s counts. Already in poor health, his condition deteriorated, but he successfully negotiated a resolution. At age 62, he died soon after on the evening of 17-18 February. By the 18th-century, people had begun associating the house near St. Andrew’s Church with the place where he died. The Prussian government purchased the house in 1862-1863, restored the building in late-Gothic style, and authorized recreations of the rooms and furnishings at the time of Luther’s death. Key items now on exhibit include a 1541 Bible with handwritten notes by Luther and other Reformers, and the cloth covering Luther’s coffin in 1546 on the procession from Eisleben to Wittenberg. Other displays include his final weeks and days leading up to his death, and his thoughts on mortality and life after death. A look at the modern extension to the museum can be found here.

Museum Luther’s Death House
Address: Andreaskirchplatz 7.
Summer hours (1 April to 31 October): Daily, 1000h to 1800h.
Winter hours (1 November to 31 March): Tuesday to Sunday, 1000h to 1700h.
Admission fee: check here for single admission or combination admission.

Museum Luther Death House, Museum Luthers Sterbehaus, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

The plaque above the front portal reads: “In diesem Hause starb Dr. M. Luther den 12. Februar 1246.” (Dr. Martin Luther died in this house on 12 February 1246.) We now know he died in another location down the street at Markt 56. (HL)

Museum Luther Death House, Museum Luthers Sterbehaus, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Luther’s final journey in 1546 to Eisleben to mediate a dispute among Mansfeld noblemen. (HL)

Museum Luther Death House, Museum Luthers Sterbehaus, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Lucas Furtenagel was on hand to draw Luther’s portrait in death. This Bible was owned by Furtenagel and what makes the book unique are the handwritten notes from Luther, his reformer colleagues, his son, and his two grandchildren. “Rudolstädter Medianbibel”, Vol. 2. Wittenberg: Hans Lufft, 1541. (HL)

Cloth used to cover Luther coffin, Museum Luther Death House, Museum Luthers Sterbehaus, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Under clear housing in a wood case is the cloth (pall) used in 1546 to cover Luther’s coffin from Eisleben to Wittenberg. (HL)

Museum Luther Death House, Museum Luthers Sterbehaus, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Casts of Luther’s death mask and hands, 1926 plaster reconstruction by Prof. Hans Hahne. Original casts made immediately after Luther’s death are now housed in Halle’s market church “Unser Lieben Frauen”. (HL)

Museum Luther Death House, Museum Luthers Sterbehaus, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

A mighty tree in the courtyard in the modern expansion of the museum (HL)

Museum Luther Death House, Museum Luthers Sterbehaus, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

The actual location where Luther died

The much publicized location of Luther’s death house is not the actual site of his death. Due to miscommunication and confusion, Luther died at the location now occupied by the Hotel Graf Von Mansfeld across the town hall and town square. At what is now Markt 56, the original building where Luther died was demolished in 1570, and another building took its place. The Prussian State had erroneously purchased the building up the street near St. Andrew’s Church, because an historian at the time mistook the residence of the Drachstedt family (who were family friends of the Luthers) for the site of Martin Luther’s death. The error wasn’t discovered until recently, and it was too costly to make wholesale changes to the museum (let alone move, even if it was possible). Also, with the current location occupied by the hotel and the hotel’s owners uninterested in turning the venue into a pilgrims’ site, the museum about Luther’s death serves its purpose to educate, and visitors should simply keep in mind the distinction between locations.

Hotel Graf von Mansfeld, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Hotel Graf von Mansfeld

Hotel Graf von Mansfeld, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

The hotel menu is front and centre on display, but at upper right is the sign “Luther war hier” (Luther was here)

Hotel Graf von Mansfeld, Eisleben, Lutherstadt Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

“Luther rose” in cobblestone pavement in front of the hotel


With the train, Eisleben is about 80 minutes from Erfurt, 80 minutes from Leipzig (with 1 change of train in Halle or Bitterfeld), and 2 hours from Berlin (with 1 change of train in Halle or Bitterfeld).

Click on the arrow-window icon at the upper-left corner of the map below for the legend.

My thanks to IMG- and Sachsen-Anhalt-Tourismus, the city of Eisleben, and Anja Ulrich for her time as guide in Eisleben and Mansfeld. I made the photos above on 26 and 27 October 2016. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9gq. IMG- and Sachsen-Anhalt-Tourismus supported my visit to the German federal state of Saxony-Anhalt from 25 October to 3 November 2016 inclusive. I also received assistance from the cities of Mansfeld, Dessau, Halle (Saale), and Wittenberg.

20+ German ‘Welterbe’ for UNESCO World Heritage Day

Above: Cologne at dusk, 26 May 2016 (HL).

Every year UNESCO-Welterbetag (UNESCO World Heritage Day) in Germany is celebrated on the first Sunday in June. I highlight a number of places designated World Heritage Sites in Germany.

  1. Aachen Cathedral (Aachener Dom)
  2. Bamberg Old Town (Bamberger Altstadt)
  3. Berlin Museum Island (Museumsinsel)
  4. Bremen Roland (Bremer Roland)
  5. Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom)
  6. Dessau Bauhaus
  7. Eisenach Wartburg
  8. Eisleben Luther sites (Luthers Geburtshaus, Sterbehaus)
  9. Essen Zollverein
  10. Hamburg Commerical and Warehouse Districts (Kontorhausviertel, Speicherstadt)
  11. Lorsch Abbey
  12. Lübeck Old Town (Lübecker Altstadt)
  13. Potsdam Palaces and Parks
  14. Regensburg Old Town (Regensburger Altstadt)
  15. Reichenau Island
  16. Speyer Imperial Cathedral (Kaiserdom)
  17. Upper Middle Rhine Valley (Oberes Mittelrheintal)
  18. Wadden Sea (Wattenmeer)
  19. Weimar Bauhaus
  20. Weimar Classicism
  21. Wittenberg Luther sites (Lutherhaus, Stadtkirche)

In 2018 World Heritage Day in Germany takes place on June 3.
In 2018 findet der deutsche UNESCO-Welterbetag am 3. Juni statt.

UNESCO DE, UNESCO, Germany

( Click here for more )

Hamburg Miniatur Wunderland: where tiny rules large

Above: “Modelleisenbahn Wunderland (model railway wonderland); “Block D” from street-level at Kehrwieder 2.

Our family couldn’t afford the purchase of (or the space for) miniature railway sets. Christmas was a special time and with my nose pressed against shop windows, I’d dream of the world of the railroad set.

Located in the historical Speicherstadt (Warehouse district) inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015, Hamburg’s Miniature Wonderland is big on wonder, has plenty of extensive miniature sets, and does not skimp on discoveries for people of all ages. Very little on the outside tells anybody passing by that there’s another world inside.

Many are not fooled nor are they turned away.

Miniature Wonderland was voted the most popular of 100 attractions in Germany, according to the German National Tourist Board (GNTB) who polled 40-thousand international visitors to the GNTB website between March and August 2016. Museum highlights include:

  • City-state of Hamburg
  • Flughafen Knuffingen Airport
  • Germany (Bavaria)
  • Switzerland
  • Scandinavia
  • United States
  • The fall of the Berlin Wall (1989)


Hamburg

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Emergency vehicles near Rödingsmarkt station

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Police at scene of an accident

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

HafenCity

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Dammtor train station

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Night traffic next to the Hauptbahnhof (central station)

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Hauptbahnhof at night

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Visiting FC St Pauli fans arrive at the Volksparkstadion

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

A night match at the Volksparkstadion, with Hamburger SV hosting FC St. Pauli


Flughafen Knuffingen Airport

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

At the airport

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Airport traffic

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

By day, front-to-back: All Nippon Airways (ANA) Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, “Hamburg Airport” Airbus 350-800, KLM Boeing 777-300(ER) PH-BVA, Lufthansa Airbus 380-800 D-AIMA

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Early-evening at the airport

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Night landing: at centre is the taxiing TUIfly Boeing 737-8K5 D-ATUM


Germany (Bavaria)

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Schloss Neuschwanstein

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Freienstein


Switzerland

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Visitors tower over a cavernous mountain valley in Switzerland

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

St. Max

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Belloszona

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Visitors check out the model set for Belloszona

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

20-thousand spectators at DJ Bobo concert in Ticino


Scandinavia

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Rail- and road-bridge, North Sea crossing between Denmark and Norway

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Cargo train pulls into the Norwegian port city of Bergvik

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Rail- and vehicular-traffic pass in front of a weather station in northern Sweden


United States of America

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Greyhound bus passes hikers and horseriders in the desert of the American Southwest

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Interstate highway passes below Mount Rushmore National Memorial (upper right)

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Approaching Las Vegas

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Las Vegas at night


November 1989: the fall of the Berlin Wall (temporary exhibition)

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Flooding into the west, East Berliners form a narrow queue at the open border between the two Berlins and two Germanys (from east/bottom to west/top)

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

East German border guards supervise as their citizens climb over the wall into the West, where grilled sausage awaits

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

A long narrow queue of East Berliners (top-left/DDR) pours into West Berlin (lower-right)

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

The border between East Berlin/Germany and West Berlin/Germany consisted of manned watchtowers, triggered automatic rifles, mines, roaming patrols, and the infamous “death strip” (Todesstreife)


Miniatur Wunderland (or MiWuLa) can be reached with HVV public transport: U-Bahn U3 to station “Baumwall”, or bus route 6 to stop “Auf dem Sande (Speicherstadt)”.

More

•   “Christmas eggs” on a December visit
•   Hamburg’s new UNESCO World Heritage Sites (FF)
•   Fotoeins Friday: Hamburg Speicherstadt, new UNESCO WHS
•   Fotoeins Friday: Hamburg at night, Kontorhausviertel UNESCO WHS

I made the photos above on 5 December 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-8k9.

Lutherstadt Wittenberg: town’s 13 historical highlights

Above: Facing west from Kirchplatz, the Stadtkirche (City Church) and Schlosskirche (Castle Church) at upper-left and lower-right, respectively, are Wittenberg’s major landmarks.

If you’re thinking about or you’re already present in Wittenberg, two words have already provided the marquee reasons why you’re here at this blogsite and there in the town: Martin Luther.

The biggest reason why people will step foot in Wittenberg is to see and learn about how the Protestant and Reformation movement began and took hold, who the major players were, and what their roles were in the movement. For most, they’ll want to visit the four sites which form the basis for the town’s status as UNESCO World Heritage Site (WHS; see below). In addition to these four, there are other highlights for the curious and interested visitor, and all of them are easy to reach in the compact Old Town.

  1. Bugenhagenhaus (Bugenhagen House)
  2. Cranach-Haus, Cranach-Hof (Cranach House and Court)
  3. I.G. Schneider Modehaus
  4. Leucorea
  5. Luther-Eiche (Luther Oak)
  6. Lutherdenkmal (Luther Monument)
  7. Lutherhaus (Luther House) – UNESCO WHS
  8. Melanchthondenkmal (Melanchthon Monument)
  9. Melanchthonhaus (Melanchthon House) – UNESCO WHS
  10. Markt, Rathaus (Market Square, Town Hall)
  11. Schlosskirche (Castle Church) – UNESCO WHS
  12. Stadtbäche (town streams)
  13. Stadtkirche St. Marien (St. Mary’s Town Church) – UNESCO WHS


1.   Bugenhagenhaus (Bugenhagen House)

Considered the “Third Reformer” after Martin Luther and Philipp Melanchthon, John Bugenhagen was from 1523 the priest at Wittenberg’s Town Church (where he is buried), lecturer of theology at Wittenberg University, and Martin Luther’s personal adviser. He also became responsible for supporting the Reformation in northern Germany and Scandinavia. He was also known as Doctor Pomeranus for his roots in Pomerania (present-day northern Germany). Bugenhagen led the wedding service for Martin Luther and Katharina von Bora on 13 June 1525. At the northeast corner of the town’s Kirchplatz (Church Square) stands the Bugenhagen House with a sculpture of Bugenhagen nearby. Above the main door of the house a sign reads:

Hier wohnte, wirkte, und starb Dr. Johannes Bugenhagen, Gen. Sup. des Kurkreises, geb. zu Wollin in Pommern, D. 24. Juny 1485, gest. in Wittenberg D. 20 April 1558. Hebr. 13, 7.” (Dr. John Bugenhagen lived, worked, and died in this house. He was born in Wollin in Pomerania on 1485 June 24, appointed and served as the superintendent general of the Electorate of Saxony, and he died on 1558 April 20.)

Johannes Bugenhagen, Doktor Pomeranus, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Bugenhagenhaus (Bugenhagen House)

Johannes Bugenhagen, Doktor Pomeranus, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Johannes Bugenhagen statue between Bugenhagenhaus and Stadtkirche


2.   Cranach-Haus, Cranach-Hof (Cranach House and Court)

Lucas Cranach the Elder and Lucas Cranach the Younger were both renowned painters in medieval Germany. The Cranach family housed Katharina von Bora after she left the nunnery; the Cranachs became close friends to the Luther family. The Cranachs would also become painters and artists for the Reformation. Cranach Senior was also an astute businessman as he purchased a variety of properties in town. Of his many holdings, two are now owned by the town: Cranach the Elder’s first property at Markt 4 (Cranach House) which he purchased in 1512, and the town’s prominent property at Schlossstrasse 1 which would be his home, painting studio, printing workshop, and pharmacy.

In the courtyard at Schlossstrasse 1, two plaques read:

Lucas Cranach d. Ältere (1472-1553), Maler und Unternehmer; 1537-1544 Bürgermeister. (Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1472-1553: artist and businessman; town mayor 1537-1544.)

Lucas Cranach d. Jüngere (1515-1586), Maler und Porträtist, 1565 Bürgermeister. (Lucas Cranach the Younger, 1515-1586: artist and portraitist;
town mayor 1565.)

The sign over the door to the pharmacy reads:

Lucas Cranach, Maler zu Wittenberg, wie er sich selbst stets geschrieben, wurde 1472 zu Kronach in Franken geboren, kam 1504 nach Wittenberg, kaufte 1520 diese Apotheke, war von 1537 bis 1544 Bürgermeister und starb am 16. October 1553 in Weimar. Die Stadt Wittenberg im Jahre 1872. (Painter in Wittenberg, Lucas Cranach the Elder was born in 1472 in Kronach, Franconia, arrived in Wittenberg in 1504, purchased this pharmacy building in 1520, served as town mayor between 1537 and 1544, and died 1553 October 16 in Weimar. Inscription by the town of Wittenberg in 1872.)

Cranach-Hof, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Cranach courtyard at Schlossstrasse 1, with statue of Lucas Cranach the Elder, by Frijo Müller-Belecke

Cranach-Apotheke, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Cranach-Apotheke (Cranach Pharmacy) at Schlossstrasse 1


3.   I.G. Schneider Modehaus (Clothing Store)

At the present location of the I.G. Schneider clothing store was a former hotel where luminaries such as Grand-Duke Karl August of Saxony-Weimar, French emperor Napoleon I, Russian writer Maxim Gorki, and German writer Friedrich Schiller once stayed.

Modehaus, I.G. Schneider, historical building, Wittenberg, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Four plaques on south-facing wall: Grand-Duke Karl August, Napoleon I, Maxim Gorki, and Friedrich Schiller.


4.   Leucorea (Fridericianum)

Frederick III (Elector of Saxony, also known as “Frederick the Wise”) founded in 1502 the “Alma Mater Leucorea“, known as Wittenberg University. The word “Leucorea” comes from the Greek “leukos oros” or “white mountain” in reference to the town’s name Wittenberg. The university would become a centre for arts, sciences, humanities, and theology, greatly helped by the arrival and presence of Martin Luther and Philipp Melanchthon. These two would help define the spiritual life of the university and town, and the university would become a vital centre for discussion and dissemination for ideas and spirit for the Reformation. The former “Fridericianum” university buildings would be converted to military barracks and residences. The site is now home to the Foundation for Public Law at the Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Stiftung des öffentlichen Rechts an der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle–Wittenberg).

Leucorea, Fridericianum, Stiftung des öffentlichen Rechts an der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle–Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Leucorea (Fridericianum). A closer look at the top of the arch in the image below …

Leucorea, Fridericianum, Stiftung des öffentlichen Rechts an der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle–Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Hodie michi, cras tibi” is about the short temporal nature of human existence: “here today, gone tomorrow” or “today, it’s me; tomorrow, it’s you.”


5.   Luther-Eiche (Luther Oak)

This location was one of the town’s former city gates, the Elster Gate, where it was common practice in Luther’s time (15th- to 16th-century) to burn the clothes of people who died from disease. In 1520 three years after his (apparent) posting of the 95 Theses at the city’s Castle Church, Martin Luther received a ‘papal bull’ warning him of excommunication from the Catholic Church if he continued his “heretical teachings.” Luther promptly burned the papal bull here in front of Elster Gate on 10 December 1520. Stories state that an oak tree was planted at the spot the following day. The tall thick oak tree in the picture below was planted in 1830 on the 300th anniversary of the Augsburg Confession (see Melanchthon).

Luther-Eiche, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Luther Oak (left-centre)


6.   Lutherdenkmal (Luther Monument)

The town’s market square is the location for the Luther Monument (1821) which is thought to be the oldest Luther memorial in Germany.

Lutherdenkmal, Luther Memorial, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Martin Luther


7.   Lutherhaus (Luther House) – UNESCO WHS

This house is where Martin Luther and his family lived, from his arrival in 1508 until his death in 1546. The building is now museum and testament to his family and to his work. Examples of his home- and work-life merge in and out of the various rooms within the house. Former nun Katharina von Bora married Luther and she eventually took charge of the household and its finances. Her support at home played a critical role in Martin’s life for which he was clearly most grateful; he referred to her as “meine herzliebe Käthe” or “my dearest Kate.”

Lutherhaus, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Luther Haus, from Collegienstrasse


8.   Melanchthondenkmal (Melanchthon Monument)

Considered the “Second Reformer” after Martin Luther, Philipp Melanchthon studied Greek and Hebrew, and became professor in Greek in 1518 at Wittenberg University. He turned his interests to theology and began lecturing on the subject after securing a degree in theology from the university in 1519. A major figure in helping Luther to translate the Old Testament into German, Melanchthon was also an important player in drafting the Augsburg Confessions in 1530. He would be known as “Praeceptor Germaniae” or “Germany’s teacher” for his lifelong dedication to reorganize the education system. Wittenberg’s market square is also the location for the Melanchthon Monument (1865).

Melanchthondenkmal,  Melanchthon Memorial, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Melanchthon monument, at Markt


9.   Melanchthonhaus (Melanchthon House) – UNESCO WHS

This house was built between 1536 and 1539 for Philipp Melanchthon and his family. The building now houses a museum dedicated to Melanchthon with exhibitions about his work and family life.

Melanchthonhaus, Melanchthon House, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Back courtyard, Melanchthon House


10.   Markt, Rathaus (Market Square, Town Hall)

Like most towns, Market Square is the past and present focal point of the town’s activities for commerce, politics, and justice. The Renaissance-style Town Hall was built between 1523 and 1535, and the portico (“raised porch”) in 1573 comes complete with the sculpture of Justicia, the (Roman) goddess of justice, accompanied by six figures representing bravery, faith, hope, love, patience, and wisdom. The square is also home to the Luther monument (1821) and the Melanchthon monument (1865).

Wittenberger Rathaus, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Rathaus


11.   Schlosskirche (Castle Church) – UNESCO WHS

The Castle Church is best known as the location where Martin Luther apparently posted his 95 Theses. Constructed between 1489 and 1525 by Frederick III, the church was part of the original castle compound for the electors of Saxony. The church became the university’s church in 1503 with Protestant services beginning in 1524. The church is home to the graves for Martin Luther, Philipp Melanchthon, and Frederick III. I featured this city landmark in a separate post here.

Schlosskirche, Luthergarten, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Castle Church, from the Luther Garden


12.   Stadtbäche (town streams)

In the Middle Ages (c. 14th-15th centuries AD/CE), the Rischebach and Trajuhnscherbach streams were diverted into the city for water-powered milling. Around the diverted streams were breweries, tanners, and dyers, as well as fishmongers who could keep fresh fish caught from the Elbe river. The city streams were closed in the late 19th-century for reasons of hygiene, but by the 1990s, plans to reopen the streams as free-flowing water through the city came to light, and by 2006, water flowed through the Altstadt along Coswiger Strasse and Collegienstrasse/Schlossstrasse.

Rischebach, Coswiger Strasse, Schlosskirche, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Rischebach stream at lower-centre: Coswiger Strasse, west to Schlosskirche


13.   Stadtkirche St. Marien (St. Mary’s Town Church) – UNESCO WHS

With the original St. Mary’s chapel built around 1280 AD/CE, the church is the town’s oldest building which houses the altar designed and built by both Cranach the Elder and Cranach the Younger. At a time when church services were conveyed only in Latin, the first mass delivered entirely in German is thought to have taken place in this church. I will feature this landmark in a separate post.

Stadtkirche, Luthergarten, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

City Church, from the Luther Garden


Other highlights include:

•   “Luther 1517” 360-degree panorama (by Yadegar Asisi)
•   Luthergarten (Luther garden)
•   Haus der Geschichte (House of History)
•   Museum für Stadtgeschichte (Museum of the town’s history)
•   Hundertwasserschule (Hundertwasser School)

Deutsche Bahn service to Wittenberg:

•   hourly train service from Berlin with InterCity Express trains (40 minutes) or Regional Express trains (80 minutes).
•   hourly train service from Leipzig with InterCity or InterCity Express trains (30-35 minutes).


Click the arrow-window icon in the upper-left corner of the map below to toggle for the legend. Note the two train stations near Wittenberg’s Old Town. “Lutherstadt Wittenberg (Bahnhof)” is the town’s main station served by InterCity Express (ICE) trains and regional trains. Located adjacent to the Luther Garden in the southern part of the Old Town, “Lutherstadt Wittenberg Altstadt” station is served only by regional trains.

My thanks to IMG- and Sachsen-Anhalt-Tourismus, the city of Wittenberg, and the Luther Hotel for their patronage and access to facilities. I made the photos from 29 to 31 October 2016 inclusive. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9ew. IMG- and Sachsen-Anhalt-Tourismus supported my visit to the German federal state of Saxony-Anhalt from 25 October to 3 November 2016 inclusive. I also received assistance from the cities of Eisleben, Mansfeld, Dessau, and Halle (Saale).

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