Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘Architecture’ category

Fotoeins Friday in Berchtesgadener Land: Ramsau

Deep in the southeast corner of Germany is the picturesque town of Ramsau, about 15 minutes west from Berchtesgaden. Completed in 1512, the town’s St. Sebastian Parish Church provides a human and transitory counterpoint to the much longer geologic timescale of the surrounding Northern Limestone Alps with an age of about 250 million years. It’s no surprise that the visual church-mountain combination is a popular photographic motif.

I made the photo above on 26 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/14, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glI.

St. Johannes der Täufer, Obergrainau, Grainau, Waxenstein, Wetterstein, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bayern, Bavaria, Oberbayern, Upper Bavaria, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in the Alps: Grainau

An infrequent but sure way to get me up, oot, and aboot in early-morning is if there is good light; if there’s the promise of something sparkly and shiny; and if there’s the promise of a subsequent shot. This image takes place in late-spring at 645am in Grainau, about 15 minutes west from the Bavarian town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen in southern Germany. The St. John the Baptist church and cemetery lie at the foot of the looming Wetterstein mountains. The country’s highest mountain, Zugspitze, pokes out from behind to the right of the church steeple.

I made the photo above on 28 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glP.

Guthrie Theater, Gold Medal Flour, Mill City Museum, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Guthrie and the Gold Medal

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota. I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

The “Gold Medal Flour” is a city landmark associated with the Mill City Museum and the history and economic impact of flour mills. Next door is another city landmark that is the Guthrie Theater; visitors can step inside to gaze at the architecture and interior design, as well as panorama views over the city and Mississippi River.

I made the photo above on 11 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gn1.

My Vienna: Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky, mother of the modern kitchen

Who: Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky.
Key: 1st woman architect in Austria, designer of something we take entirely for granted.
Quote: “I developed the kitchen as an architect, not as a housewife.”
Where: MAK Vienna.

I always liked how cooking had well-defined endpoints: a desirable start, and a satisfying conclusion. I enjoy the process: the contemplation of “what to make,” the gathering of ingredients, the preparation, and naturally, the consumption. There might also be something to say about the duality of creation and annihilation …

That got me to thinking about kitchens as a critical unit of a home. Before the 20th-century, the wealthy could afford to have staffed kitchens; everybody else had access to no kitchen or an unsafe unhygienic kitchen in a building separate to their living quarters. The assumed universality of a kitchen within a home is a 20th-century concept and implementation that sought to overcome social and economic class. The design of a modern kitchen invites repeated patterns of movement and action around where cookware, utensils, condiments, glassware, etc. are stored and where the central focus of cooking activity takes place.

For everyone who spends any time in a kitchen, we have Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky to thank.

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Macy's, Bon Marche building, The Bon, Thanksgiving, holiday star, Seattle, Washington, USA, fotoeins.com

Seattle: Thanksgiving holiday star & fireworks

As a wae lad, I was fascinated by comparative branding and marketing, and that’s how I got to thinking about the differences and similarities between Canada’s Hudson’s Bay Company in greater Vancouver and the American Bon Marché in Bellingham and Seattle. But I don’t ever recall a tradition of lighting a star for October/Canadian Thanksgiving.

In downtown Seattle, a grand building opened in 1929 for the locally-owned Bon Marché department store, operating for over 7 decades until “The Bon” became Macy’s in 2005. A holiday star designed by Bob James in 1957 would become a fixture for the city and her residents. In September 2019, Macy’s declared the downtown Seattle location would be closing at the end of February 2020. At the time, the announcement included no plans for lighting the holiday star.

However, the star looks to be coming back for one more (final?) illumination, as a local lighting company agreed to refurbish and reassemble the star in time for the 2019 Thanksgiving season. Festivities occur Friday November 29, beginning with the annual Thanksgiving parade followed by the star’s lighting and fireworks.

•   MyNorthwest, 27 Nov 2019.

( Click here for images and more )

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