Fotoeins Fotografie

photography as worlds between words

Posts tagged ‘Welterbe’

Pfahlbaumuseum, Pile Dwellings, Bodensee, Lake Constance, Unteruhldingen, Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, UNESCO, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Prehistoric Lake Dwellings on the Bodensee

Prehistoric houses with piles, poles, or stilts next to lakes and rivers around the Alps dating as early as 5000 BCE are found in over 100 locations across six countries. 15 locations are in the German state of Baden-Württemberg, of which one is at Unteruhldingen. As a sign of universal human heritage, UNESCO inscribed the discovery sites of pile dwellings in all six countries as a single World Heritage Site in 2011. The countries include Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Switzerland. The picture here is a present-day reconstruction at Unteruhldingen’s Pfahlbau (Pile Dwellings) Museum dedicated to the discovery site nearby that is under water and closed to the public.

I made the photo above on 23 September 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/640-sec, f/16, ISO1000, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bLQ.

St. Peter and Paul, Reichenau, Bodensee, Lake Constance, Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com, UNESCO, World Heritage

Fotoeins Friday: St. Peter & Paul Church, Reichenau

The city of Konstanz is located in southwest Germany on the shores of Lake Constance within sight and ferry to neighbouring Austria and Switzerland. With Südbaden bus 7372 from Konstanz, Reichenau Island is an easy daytrip getaway to beautiful lush and tranquil surroundings. One of the most important historical locations on the island is the Saint Peter and Paul Church. As one of the oldest churches on the island, the original church was built and inaugurated in 799 AD/CE shortly after Bishop Egino’s arrival from Verona. The present-day church was built in the 11th-century at the same location after the original was demolished. In 2000, UNESCO inscribed Reichenau Island as World Heritage Site.

I made the photo above on 22 September 2017 with a Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/400-sec, f/16, ISO500, and 105mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bM8.

Before Bauhaus: Alfeld Fagus Factory, UNESCO WHS

Before Germany’s Bauhaus found its first footing in Weimar, there was the Fagus-Werk in Alfeld.

The Fagus factory building is looked upon as the first building in the world for the modern architectural age, and is the predecessor to the elegant 1926 Bauhaus headquarters building in Dessau. Fagus company founder Karl Benscheidt commissioned architect and future Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius, to create and build a shoe-making factory as an artistic project. Gropius and his collaborator Adolf Meyer stuck with working floor-plans by architect Eduard Werner, and set their sights on new exterior and interior designs. Completed in 1911, the factory’s office building set a new standard for 20th-century industrial architecture with steel and glass construction and tall unsupported windows at the corners of the building.

“Fagus” is Latin for “beech tree”, and shoemaking began with shoe lasts or moulds constructed from beech wood, which were sold and distributed around the world to other companies for the productions of shoes. In the 1920s, Benscheidt developed the turning precision-lathe speeding up production, prompting growth and expansion and elevating the company to world’s top producer of shoe lasts. Today, the building is still a working factory: Fagus creates plastic lasts milled by automated machinery to precise specifications for specific designs by shoe companies. Also on-site is GreCon which produces systems for fire-detection and fire-extinguishing in industrial settings. The Fagus factory building was recognized as “unique living monument” and inscribed by UNESCO as World Heritage Site (Welterbe) in 2011.

With a population of over 20-thousand people, Alfeld is located in the German federal state of Lower Saxony. The town’s reach by train is 30-minutes from Hannover or 40-minutes from Göttingen, after which is a short 5- to 10-minute walk from Alfeld(Leine)1 train station to the entrance of the Fagus/GreCon complex. Visitors can walk around the working factory site, stop at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre, sit in the neighbouring café for coffee or tea, and visit the museum dedicated to the building’s origins, the building’s century-long history of shoe-making, and a general history of footwear.

Walter Gropius and others would move to Weimar to establish a centre of art, design, thought, and attitude for Bauhaus in 1919, eight years after inauguration of the Fagus-Werk.

Die Baukunst soll ein Spiegel des Lebens und der Zeit sein. (Architecture should be a mirror to life and its time.) – Walter Gropius.

( Click here for more )

My Hamburg: Chilehaus in the Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO WHS

On 5 July 2015, UNESCO awarded World Heritage status to two sites in Hamburg: the Speicherstadt (Warehouse District) and the Kontorhausviertel (Office Building District). In the latter are two important brick buildings: Chilehaus and the Sprinkenhof, representative of the construction in the late 19th- and early 20th-century.

The Chilehaus was built by Fritz Höger for client Henry Sloman from 1922 to 1924 in the Kontorhausviertel as a prime example of German expressionist architecture using hard-fired brick. Höger undertook the project for Hamburg merchant and banker Sloman who made his fortune in importing nitrates from Chile. Built entirely to serve and complement the functions of the warehouses in neighbouring Speicherstadt, the Kontorhausviertel was the first dedicated office- and commercial-district on the European continent.


Sprinkenhof, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Sprinkenhof

Sprinkenhof, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Sprinkenhof

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, northwest corner: Niedernstrasse at Depenau

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, southwest corner: Pumpen at Messberg

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, east ‘prow’: Burchardstrasse

Chilehaus, Kontorhausviertel, UNESCO, Weltkulturerbe, World Heritage, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Chilehaus, up the ‘prow’

Kontorhausviertel at night, Chilehaus, Sprinkenhof, UNESCO, World Heritage, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Kontorhausviertel at night (on Burchardstrasse)


(Click on the arrow-window icon at the upper-left corner of the map below for an explanation of the map symbols.)

I made the photos above on 26 June 2010 and 3 December 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie on fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-biH.

Koblenz: 1st and 2nd Deutsches Eck (German Corner)

Above: West view to Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein. 2015 photo by Taxiarchos228 (Wladyslaw Sojka). I’ve added the following labels: (1) Seilbahn/Gondola, (2) St. Kastor Basilica, (3) Deutschherrenhaus, (4) first Deutsches Eck, (5) Memorial to German Unity (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial), (6) reclamation in the late 19th-century, (7) second Deutsches Eck.

Many will know, have seen, or have read about the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) in the German city of Koblenz. The river city has plenty to provide: visitors wander into the vineyards to sip on crisp white wine from local grapes, vacation on long cabin-boats to enjoy the river scenery, or explore the surrounding Upper Rhine River Valley.

But Koblenz is also well known by virtue of its name after the junction where the rivers Moselle and Rhine meet. By the first-century AD/CE, the Romans had built for strategic protection a fort1 called “Castellum apud Confluentes“, Latin for “the castle at the confluence”. What most commonly acknowledge as the Deutsches Eck (German corner) is not the original location. Half concealed among the trees some 200 metres back near the Deutschherrenhaus is the first location of the Deutsches Eck.

What follows:

  • a map to the area and my photos from the present-day,
  • a short history of the “Deutsches Eck,” and
  • archival images from the mid-16th century to early 20th century.

( Click here for more )

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