Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story
Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Sydney’s April full-moon: fall and rise in a single day

Previously I wrote about how I tracked the path of the setting sun over four consecutive days, until I captured the setting sun at the crown of the Harbour Bridge’s arch in Sydney.

I understood that the full moon would occur on the morning of 26 April 2013, which would provide a good opportunity to observe the moon-set close in time with the sunrise in the morning, and the moon-rise close in time after the sunset later that day. At the full-moon phase, sunrise-moonset and sunset-moonrise observations can be made at about the same time in the morning and evening, respectively; for more, see notes about moon phases here.

I obtained the following sun and moon data from timeanddate.com. All times are in Australian Eastern Standard Time (UTC+10); azimuths are measured with 0° North, 90° East, 180° South, and 270° West.

Sun/Moon Rise time Set time Rise azimuth Set azimuth Other
SUN 0626h 1720h 74° 286° day-length 10hr54min
MOON 0632h 253° full-moon 0558h
1735h 109°

In the quiet morning hour, I watched the full-moon set before the sun bathed the Central Business District in golden light. The full-moon was also in partial eclipse, as there’s a visible “shadow” over the lower-right portion of the full-moon (2nd image in the sequence above). Ten hours later that afternoon, I returned to watch the sunset behind the Sydney Harbour Bridge, followed by the full-moon rising over the Tasman Sea.

With a bit of luck, a bit of dedication, and a good warm fleece to hold off the morning and early-evening chill, I enjoyed making this sequence of photos on the same calendar-day.


Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonset, CBD, Coathanger

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Full moon, partly eclipsed

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Full moon, partly eclipsed

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonset inside Earth’s shadow (CBD, Coathanger)

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Setting of partially-eclipsed moon, just before sunrise

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Setting of partially-eclipsed moon, just before sunrise

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Setting of partially-eclipsed moon, just before sunrise

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonset, just before sunrise

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonset, just before sunrise

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Morning light on CBD and Coathanger

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Late afternoon sun over CBD, Coathanger

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Sydney CBD silhouetted in post-sunset light

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonrise over the Tasman Sea, after sunset

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonrise over the Tasman Sea, after sunset

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonrise over the Tasman Sea

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonrise over the Tasman Sea

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonrise over the Tasman Sea

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moon rising over Tasman Sea

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Moonrise through better transparency


With a Canon EOS450D (XSi) camera, Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II lens, and Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM lens, I made all of the photos above on 26 April 2013 without tripod or filters. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

2 Responses to “Sydney’s April full-moon: fall and rise in a single day”

  1. Catherine Sweeney

    What a fantastic series of photos. To your comment that it took ” luck, a bit of dedication, and a good warm fleece …” I would add — skill. Well done!

    Like

    Reply
    • fotoeins

      Hi, Catherine. It’s true: it’s been through a lot of trial and error with the thousands of exposures I’ve made, and learning what my camera can and cannot do in a variety of situations. A special situation comes up, and I like to think that I’m ready. I’m always surprised by some little thing that happens. For example, early in the morning, I’d forgotten how still a city can be at that hour. Thanks for reading and for your kind comment! 🙂

      Like

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