Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘sculpture’

My Praha: David Černý, skillful s**t disturber

Considered “enfant terrible” in the European and Czech art scene, David Černý frequently has courted both controversy and amusement from the beginning in 1991 with the Pink (Soviet) Tank. Is he infuriating and crude or enlightened and hilarious? Is he misunderstood social commentator or attention-seeking hooligan? He continues to make art at home in Prague, and provoke strong reactions.

Černý’s creations can be found throughout the Czech capital city. You can decide for yourself if his artwork is inspiring or dull.

  • Babies (Miminka), at 2 locations
  • Brownnosers
  • Embryo
  • Hanging Out (Viselec)
  • Horse (Kůň)
  • K on Sun
  • Piss (Proudy)
  • Quo Vadis?
  • Zátopek’s Legs (Zátopkovy nohy)

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Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

My Seattle: Solar power sun flower sound garden

A set of very tall “flowers” greets visitors to the Seattle Center. The sculpture by Dan Corson is called “Sonic Bloom” for the Pacific Science Center. Five flowers constructed with steel, acrylic, and fibreglass stand up to 13 metres (40 feet) above the ground. The stripes along the stalks are large mysterious barcodes left as puzzles for people to decode. Night-time illumination by the sculpture is powered completely from solar energy stored on panels “capping” the flowers and panels at the neighboring Science Center. The sculpture is a playful mix of both sight and sound as detection sensors subsequently emit choral tones in the presence of movement.

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com
Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

“Sonic Bloom” (Dan Corson) with the Pacific Science Center behind.

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Together with the Space Needle, all lit up!


I made the media above by day on 10 October 2016 and at night on 14 April 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9zW.

Martin Luther, Diet of Worms, Emperor Charles V, Reformation, Reformation 500, Luther 2017, Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, fotoeins.com

Worms: Martin Luther on trial, 1521

For anybody strolling around a German town, a natural point of visual gravity is the spire associated with the town’s cathedral. That’s no different in the town of Worms on the Rhine river between Mainz and Mannheim. What is different in a walk through the gardens next to the cathedral is that “Martin Luther was here” and that events here put his life in danger.

2021 will mark the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s trial at the Imperial Parliament (Diet) in Worms.

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"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 2 cultures, 1 ocean (Seattle SAM)

Something bright red and green catches my eye.

Imbedded in bright red, I see an elongated “eye” whose shape is familiar and prevalent within First Nations’ art from the Pacific Northwest (northeast Pacific). I’m also acquainted with that shade of green, not only from Chinese jade but also with the “pounamu” or “greenstone” from New Zealand.

In the Seattle Art Museum, the “Pacific Currents” display represents a variety of cultures across the big (western) ocean. I can’t say I’m surprised why I’m greatly attracted to this piece of art, a piece which represents my place of birth and a place of renewal.

The caption accompanying this beautiful green-red sculpture reads:

Canoe/Waka, 2007.

Blown and sand-carved glass, pounamu (New Zealand jade), red sealing wax.

Preston Singletary (Tlingit, born 1963) and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner (Māori, born 1972).

Collection of Preston Singletary.

“Revivals of traditional watercraft-building among Pacific Northwest indigenous people and Māori of New Zealand have become a catalyst for composing songs and dances, creating masks and regalia, and reviving oral traditions. In Canoe/Waka, the artists pay homage to the canoe as a vessel of knowledge. Gardiner carves pounamu – associated with chiefs and expressions of peace – as the canoe prow while Singeltary sand-carves the glass that forms the canoe’s structure.”

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

“Canoe/Waka”, by Preston Singletary and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner


I made the photos on 9 February 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9KT.

Jan Hus (John Huss), Pomník mistra Jana Husa, Jan Hus Memorial, Chrám Matky Boží před Týnem, Church of Our Lady before Tyn, Staroměstské námesti, Old Town Square, Prague, Praha, Czech Republic, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Jan Hus Day

Above/featured: Jan Hus looks up at the Church of Our Lady before Tyn – 4 Jul 2008 (HL).

Before Martin Luther, there was Jan Hus …

Over centuries, the Catholic Church operated with total authority on religion, science, and politics and far-reaching aspects on daily life. It’s a nice racket to claim you’re the only legitimate path to God and salvation. What Jan Hus (John Huss) and subsequent Martin Luther would set in motion when they openly challenged the superiority of the Church and introduced the idea of an individual’s direct path to their own thoughts and emotions in the world and to God. Being cut out as the “middle man” did not endear these two men to the Church.

Jan Hus helped bring about “The Bohemian Reformation” in the Czech Republic in the 15th-century, predating Luther’s movement in neighbouring Germany by a century. The US Embassy in the Czech Republic describes Jan Hus as:

Jan Hus (1369-1415), a predecessor of Martin Luther, was an early 15th century Czech theologian and scholar. He advocated church reforms, such as using Czech as the liturgical language, aligning the church’s practices with teachings contained in the Bible, limiting the power of the church to spiritual matters, and stopping the sale of indulgences. Consequently, he was excommunicated from the Catholic Church in 1412 for insubordination. He was summoned to the ecclesiastical Council of Constance in 1414, where he was ordered to recant his teachings. Refusing to comply, Hus was burnt at the stake as a heretic on 6 July 1415. Over the centuries Jan Hus has become a powerful symbol of an independent Czech national identity.

News of Hus’ martyrdom sparked outrage, anger, and protests (often violent) among Czechs, and the movement eventually ignited the Hussite wars between Hus’ followers (early Protestants) and the Catholic Church. Armed conflict ended with infighting among the Hussites, and ultimately defeat of the Hussites at the hands of Catholic forces.

In 1903, Czech sculptor Ladislav Saloun began work on designing the Jan Hus Memorial. Jan Hus is seen looking up and towards the Church of Our Lady before Týn which was the primary church for the Hussites between 1419 and 1621. The memorial was inaugurated at Prague’s Old Town Square on 6 July 1915 to mark the 500th anniversary of Jan Hus’ martyrdom. As Prague was under the rule of the Habsburg (i.e., Catholic) Empire in 1915, the authorities of the day refused to acknowledge the memorial and forbade an official event. In quiet protest, city residents proceeded to blanket the new monument with flowers. The Jan Hus memorial has become a symbol of opposition against foreign rule.

6 July 2015 marked the 600th anniversary of Jan Hus’ death. What were some of the following consequences?

•   1st Defenestration in Prague, 1419
•   Jiří z Poděbrad (George of Poděbrady)
•   Precedes Martin Luther’s Reformation by 100 years
•   World’s largest Reformation monument in Worms, Germany
•   Pope John Paul II’s apology, 1999

More on Jan Hus

•   My Expats CZ
•   My Czech Republic
•   Prague.CZ

I made this photo on 4 July 2008 with the Canon EOS450D, EF 18-55 IS zoom- and kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/500s, f/7.1, ISO200, and 27mm focal length (43mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-6WM.

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