Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘sculpture’

My Seattle: living elements of the city’s black history

Oh Seattle: how is your black history defined?

With the city’s proximity to Vancouver, my time in or any understanding of Seattle was incomplete without an examination of the city’s non-white communities. I had questions about the black community and in particular why the city remains racially segregated. People of color, including black people, were once forbidden from buying houses in specific neighbourhoods because of their skin colour. The Central District (CD) thrived as a black community in the 2nd-half of the 20th-century, but now, citizens struggle with gentrification, displacement, and economic racism. There’s much more I need to ask and learn, but for now, I describe below a selection of landmarks highlighting contributions by and the historical impact of the black community to city and nation.


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My Vienna: Holocaust Memorial, by Rachel Whiteread

Where: Judenplatz, in Vienna’s Altstadt.
What: Holocaust Memorial, by Rachel Whiteread (2000).

How do you commemorate or memorialize the absent or missing? How should the void be acknowledged, recognized, and remembered? Does the act of constructing a physical monument “draw a line”, creating a physical manifestation of marking an end that gathers and wipes away all subsequent future responsibility for remembering?

In Vienna’s Old Town, what was unjustly and violently removed from the city’s long historical memory and cultural identity comes into shape at Judenplatz. Under the public square are ruins of the medieval synagogue destroyed in the pogrom of 1421 with hundreds of Jews driven out, hundreds killed by burning, and the community erased. Directly above these ruins is the Holocaust Memorial which attempts to generate experiences and memories to address the void left behind after the systematic murder of 65-thousand people.

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Imperia, Bodensee, Lake Constance, Konstanz Hafen, Konstanz, Constance, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday around Lake Constance: Imperia

She’s not looking at me; she’s looking through me.

Imperia, Bodensee, Lake Constance, Konstanz Hafen, Konstanz, Constance, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

The ”Imperia” statue stands 9 metres (30 feet) tall at the end of a pier in Lake Constance and is one of the most photographed landmarks in the city of Konstanz (Constance). The naked figures at left and right resemble the Emperor Sigismund and Pope Martin the Fifth, respectively. Peter Lenk’s sculpture memorializes the Council of Constance (1411-1414) which brought together Catholic church leaders from around Europe to decide once and for all a single pope from three during the Papal Schism. With many church leaders and support staff gathered in the city, there was great opportunity to tempt and satiate the flesh with an equal gathering of courtesans, as symbolized by Imperia. However, Lenk references Honoré de Balzac’s short story “La Belle Impéria” (Beautiful Imperia), whose historical character was a well-read Italian courtesan who never visited Konstanz and died almost 100 years after the Council of Constance.

The caption accompanying the statue reads:

“Römische Lebedame und Muse. Skulptur 9 m hoch, 18 to schwer. Erbaut 1993 vom Bodmaner Bildhauer Peter Lenk nach einer Geschichte von Honoré de Balzac über das Konstanzer Konzil, 1414-1418.” (Fremden-Verkehrsverein Konstanz e.V.)

I made both images on 21 September 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-e7o.

Einsteinbrunnen, Einstein fountain, Jürgen Goertz, Albert Einstein, Amtsgericht Ulm, Ulm, Baden-Württenberg, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday um Ulm herum: Einsteinbrunnen

In Ulm, um Ulm, und um Ulm herum

It’s a well-known “Zungenbrecher” (literally, “tongue breaker” or tongue-twister) which translates as “In (the city of) Ulm, around Ulm, and round about Ulm”. Located in southern Germany in the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Ulm is where Albert Einstein was born on 14 March 1879.

Next to the Amtsgericht (Magistrates’ Court) is the Einsteinbrunnen or Einstein fountain, a bronze sculpture made by Jürgen Goertz in 1984. The sculpture consists of three parts: a rocket body representing technological advancement hurtling into space with the threat of annihilation by atomic weapons; a snail shell representing nature and wisdom regarding the judgement and control of technology; and Einstein’s head with a mischievous cheeky expression with big eyes and tongue stuck out.

I made the photo above on 24 September 2017 with a Canon 6D mark1, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/320-sec, f/8, ISO2000, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-dBg.

My Salzburg: more modern art than a Mozart mix

Thankfully, there’s more to Salzburg than “The Sound of Music”.#

Salzburg is a well-known historical city in north-central Austria next to the border with Germany. For a different way of examining the city that goes beyond the history of the Habsburgs and the music of Mozart, the Walk of Modern Art allows visitors and residents to walk through parts of the city for a mix of historical and contemporary perspectives at street-level and from the cliffs above. The art pieces are placed throughout the city’s Old Town to coincide with key landmarks and sights. The city of Salzburg also provides information about the walk. UNESCO inscribed Salzburg’s Old Town as World Heritage Site in 1996.


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