Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts from the ‘Arts’ category

Fotoeins Friday: “From shangri-la to shangri-la”, by Ken Lum

I’m highlighting this month Chinese-Canadian artist Ken Lum: born and raised in the western Canadian city of Vancouver; he began studying chemistry at university before switching completely to art. Today, not only does he continue to make art, but he also comments about the contemporary and historical nature of art and about how art and society continuously shapes and informs each other. All of Lum’s pieces featured this month are located outdoors and freely accessible to the public at zero cost.

These look like wooden shacks along a creek or small river. In 2010, Lum completed a sculptural work commissioned by the City of Vancouver next to the four-star Shangri-La Hotel, as a “reminder of contested local histories.” Meant only as a temporary display, the piece was eventually removed. In 2012, the District of North Vancouver purchased Lum’s piece; a modified smaller version of the sculptural piece is installed at Maplewood Flats, in the very same area where shacks had once populated the mudflats along the northern shores of Burrard Inlet. Represented are houses once owned by artist Tom Burrows, writer Malcolm Lowry, and OrcaLab founder Dr. Paul Spong.

I made the photo above on 3 Jul 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime (18.5/28mm) with digital teleconverter set to 33/50mm. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-llf.

Monument to East Vancouver, Ken Lum, East Van, VCC-Clark, Millennium Line, SkyTrain, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Monument for East Vancouver”, by Ken Lum

I’m highlighting this month Chinese-Canadian artist Ken Lum: born and raised in the western Canadian city of Vancouver; he began studying chemistry at university before switching completely to art. Today, not only does he continue to make art, but he also comments about the contemporary and historical nature of art and about how art and society continuously shapes and informs each other. All of Lum’s pieces featured this month are located outdoors and freely accessible to the public at zero cost.

In 2010, Lum completed a large sculptural work commissioned by the City of Vancouver. The work “Monument for East Vancouver” is situated in East Vancouver, standing above a rapid-transit station over the filled-in area of former tidal mudflats. Also informally called the “East Van Cross,” the sculpture situated in the “working class” or east side of the city faces west towards the wealthier parts of the city, including downtown and the west side. The symbolism regarding economic background and the specificity of place will be obvious to people of colour. Lum once said:

“… It’s a crucifix, that’s what it is – a highly charged symbol. Christ suffered on the cross. East Van suffers on the cross. The point (is): someone is suffering. And immigrants suffer the most …”

“Ken Lum”. ed. Grant Arnold, Vancouver: Douglas and McIntyre, 2011, p. 123.

I made the photo above on 31 May 2014 with a Canon EOS6D mark1. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lkW.

A Tale of Two Children: A Work for Strathcona, Ken Lum, National Works Yard, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “A Tale of Two Children”, by Ken Lum

I’m highlighting this month Chinese-Canadian artist Ken Lum: born and raised in the western Canadian city of Vancouver; he began studying chemistry at university before switching completely to art. Today, not only does he continue to make art, but he also comments about the contemporary and historical nature of art and about how art and society continuously shapes and informs each other. All of Lum’s pieces featured this month are located outdoors and freely accessible to the public at zero cost.

In 2005, Lum completed a permanent work commissioned by the City of Vancouver for its public works yard on National Avenue. The work “A Tale of Two Children: A Work for Strathcona” is not only a nod to his formative years growing up in the Strathcona neighbourhood, but provides different views to children and their changing (and precipitous) views regarding self-worth within a society that’s already prejudged them.

I made the photo above on 1 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime (18.5/28mm). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lkF.

Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Salish Girl,” by Susan Point

On the Point Grey campus of the University of British Columbia stands the Reconciliation Pole, carved by Haida hereditary chief and master carver 7idansuu (Edenshaw), known also by James Hart. The pole was raised on 1 April 2017 in a grand ceremony.

Above the “residential school” are several standing figures holding each other’s hands; a young girl with a bright red tunic was carved by Susan Point. Their feet aren’t shown, representing the lack of grounding and abundance of abuse. A blight on the nation’s history, the Canadian government stole an estimated 150-thousand indigenous children from their families, forcing them into residential schools across the country. Countless people, family generations, and once intact regional cultures were systematically destroyed, amounting to a state-sanctioned program of cultural genocide.

The Reconciliation People is a small step in not only an admission of guilt, but a part of the forward-moving process of remembrance by Canadians and reconciliation between First Nations and the national government.

Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

I made the photo above on 22 Aug 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime with settings 1/280-sec, f/16, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kBS.

Susan Point, Fusion, Marpole, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Fusion,” by Susan Point

A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally. About her sculpture Point writes (City of Vancouver):

“Fusion” is an artwork that marries mediums and cultures … as well as legends. It also, metaphorically, fuses natural imagery with modern methods. The sculpture is contemporary yet unmistakably Salish. As this development sits in traditional Musqueam territory and is close to the banks of the Fraser River, my conceptual art piece is based on the theme of “people of the Grass” as well as the “Salmon People” which is uniquely Musqueam. The human element within the salmon has universal appeal that symbolically relates to all peoples. The faces are revealed with traditional Salish elements. Overall, the forms represent a living thriving culture and our historical legacy; as well as this unique community today … giving a sense of place and a landmark that respects the past, present and future.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJI.

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