Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between Canada & Germany

Love stories in Cologne

27 Responses to “Love stories in Cologne”

    • fotoeins

      Hi, Sarahlynn. I’m interested in reading about how lovelocks are displayed in Seoul, and about the similarities and differences by comparison. Thanks again for reading and for your comment!

      Like

  1. Anita Mac

    Great collection! Love the turtle lock. Saw something similar in Prague, although not quite so many! Nice post, especially on the eve of St Valentine!

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    • fotoeins

      Hi, Anita. I’d been working on this post for a little while, but when I saw your post about a similar version in Prague, it was time, and indeed timely to get that post done in time for February 14. 🙂 Thanks again for reading!

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    • fotoeins

      Hey, Samuel. It’s generally a little difficult to find a proper balance between text and description with visuals and photographs. In this case, the locks themselves were compelling, and I’m sure you’d agree that a minimum of words in this case was the right choice. 😉 Thanks again for reading and commenting!

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    • fotoeins

      Hi, Laurel – does this post or other similar descriptions now entice you to visit Köln and have a look? 😉 Thanks for your comment!

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  2. Cathy Sweeney

    These are wonderful photos of the Hohenzollernbrücke and the love locks! I really like the concept of them — so romantic. I also loved visiting Cologne.

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    Reply
    • fotoeins

      Hi, Cathy. Thanks for coming by and reading my post on the love locks in Cologne! I like the concept, too, especially when people put the locks down and throw the lock-key over into the river. Cologne is a great party town, and it’s got great people there: it is one of my favourite cities in Germany. Thanks again for your comment!

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    • fotoeins

      Hi! If you haven’t yet visited or if you haven’t been back in awhile, Köln is not that far by train, as you know, and the place is good for a short weekend trip. A short distance from both Dom and Hauptbahnhof, the walk across the Hohenzollernbrücke is worth a look. I don’t know why I didn’t so in past visits, but I’m glad I finally did. Thanks for reading and for your comment! 🙂

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  3. emmatameside@yahoo.com

    Amazing photos, Henry. I’ve seen similar bridges of padlocks in various cities across Europe, but nothing to the scale of Cologne (although I guess it depends on the availability of long bridges too). Last year, for our anniversary, we visited Warsaw and added our own engraved padlock to the bridge there. This year, I think we’ll get to Cologne for the Cologne Christmas markets 2012 and add another padlock to those already there 🙂 It would be so nice to have a padlock in all major European cities, one for each year we’ve been together.

    I notice a lot of similar locks in your photos – are there a lot of shops close to the area that sell them to tourists? Perhaps along with engraving services? I’ll bet that’s a great little earner if you can get a shopfront in eyeshot of the bridge.

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    • fotoeins

      Hi, Emma.

      The sign in the second photo (from the top of the post) indicates that one can in fact purchase a lock with engraving to be placed onto the bridge. I don’t think they were the only service available …

      However, at either end of the bridge, there was no visible “hawker” selling locks or engraving services.

      Thank you again for stopping by and for your comment!

      Like

  4. Tips to 5 UNESCO Heritage Sites in Germany | Fotoeins Fotopress

    […] The place is rich with Roman history (Colonia, anyone?), you can drink some fine Kölsch beer, learn about the history of “cologne” in Cologne, or cheer on the homeside at the Rhein-Energie Stadion and sing chants in the local Kölsch dialect in support of the football team 1. FC Köln. Then again, another highlight may well be the “love locks” on the Hohenzollern bridge. […]

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  5. Cathy Sweeney

    I love love locks. 🙂 The ones you’ve photographed on the bridge in Cologne are particularly cool because some are so unusual. But I’m a fan of love locks everywhere. Nothing wrong with a little romance.

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    Reply
    • fotoeins

      Hi, Cathy! I have no problem with the locks either: just as love is diverse, I really enjoyed looking for diversity in the locks themselves. One of my photos in Cologne is of some graffiti on the bridge’s pavement: a question of the importance of the symbolism from the locks versus the actual love itself. When I was in Cologne last month (January), I walked across the bridge a couple of times, and that “graffiti question” was no longer there. From an engineering perspective, it is interesting to ask just how much extra weight the bridge can take from the padded locks before there’s a real issue. Finally, I was surprised by the sight of some locks in Perth, Australia, but on a much smaller scale and the locks had to be “approved”; I guess I’ll have to write that up some time, too! 🙂 Thanks for reading and for your comment!

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