Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Zillertal Alps’

Vals, Brennerbahn, S-Bahn Tirol, St. Jodok am Brenner, Brenner Pass, Tirol, Tyrol, Austria, Oesterreich, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: S-Bahn Tirol from Innsbruck to Brennero

I’m on board a S4 S-Bahn Tirol train from Innsbruck southbound to Brennero in Italy. I took this picture as the train departed St. Jodok station and rounded the “bend” in the valley. The train is on a gradual ascent, the valley narrows, and the mountains grow taller. The landscape seems to expand, even as hamlets and houses dotting the valley floor look tiny. That’s the unfolding present as the train crosses the border from Austria into Italy, and we pull slowly into the train station at Brennero for S4’s final stop.

I made the picture above on 14 May 2018 with an Fujifilm X70 mirrorless fixed-prime and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-d00.


Hafelekar, Nordkette, Nordkette cable car, Nordkettenbahn, Hungerburg funicular, Hungerburgbahn, Innsbruck, Tirol, Tyrol, Oesterreich, Austria, fotoeins.com

Tirol Tour: short jumps from Innsbruck

As one of nine states within the federal republic of Austria, Tirol is well known not only for all-season access to the Alps, but also for a variety of other attractions. With the state capital city of Innsbruck serving as home base, I explored the city on foot, and the following parts of the state with train and bus:

  1. Alpbach,
  2. Brenner,
  3. Hall in Tirol,
  4. Nordkette,
  5. Scharnitz,
  6. Stubaital, and
  7. Wilder Kaiser (Going, Ellmau, Scheffau).

For each location, I list the “why” (you should visit) and the “how” (you can get there from Innsbruck). I had specific goals, including a search for a Nobel Prize laureate, visit with friends, and expansion of a long-term photography project.

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Maibaum, Zugspitzplatt, Zugspitze, Germany, fotoeins.com

Zugspitze: can I see Italy from here?

“If I’m at the highest point in Germany, can I see Italy?”

Over the years, I’ve seen at various times the claim made about seeing Italy from the tallest mountain in Germany.

I’m startled by morning sun, streaming through the window into my hotel room in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. I rise slowly from the bed, barely able to keep my eyes open. I shuffle across the room, and pull the small linen drapes aside. It’s blue everywhere, and there isn’t a cloud in the sky. My eyes are now wide open, heart pumping with excitement, because I know skies are gonna be clear up top. Later I learn forecast conditions for the Zugspitze summit are excellent: mostly sunny, visibility out to 160 kilometres (100 miles) with a high temperature of -8C/+18F. It’s why I brought the 70-300 lens to find out for myself how true the claim really is.

Below I show photographs with sightlines and their corresponding average azimuths*: east-southeast (105 degrees), southeast (135 degrees), south (175 degrees), southwest (210 degrees), west-southwest (250 degrees). I label specific mountain peaks of interest in addition to the flag of the country where the mountain is located. In a few cases, mountains lie along the border between two nations in which case I provide two country flags. For the labeled peaks, I’ve also provided further information about mountain heights and sightline distances in the map below.

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