Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Via Raetia’

My Mittenwald: mountains, masks, music, Mahlzeit!

Above/featured: From the regional train: facing southwest over Schöttlkarstrasse and the eastern end of the Wettersteinwand at right.

The German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in 1786 described the alpine town of Mittenwald as “lebendes Bilderbuch” or “a living picture-book”. Images and descriptions in print and provided by visitors became draw and lure. Funny thing is I’d set foot and stayed in nearby Garmisch-Partenkirchen, and hadn’t taken the easy 20-minute train hop to Mittenwald.

I took care of that with two visits within a 15-month interval.

Wandering through Mittenwald is a delight because of the abundant fresh mountain air, picturesque surroundings, and the easy compact nature of the town. It’s a very familiar refrain for alpine towns in this part of the world.

Mid-winter is special with the combination of seeing mountains freshly frosted with snow, people of all ages wearing masks and costumes during carnival season, houses painted in colourful “Lüftlmalerei”, and the town’s special place in music history. When clouds break in spring and summer, it seems like an endless vista of blue skies and lakes along with green meadows and mountains to accompany your time outside on walks and hikes in the area.


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Augsburg: Fugger, Luther, & water in Germany’s 3rd oldest city

Above/featured: Facing north on Maximilianstrasse: Steigenberger Hotel Drei Mohren (left), Fuggerhäuser (orange) – HL, 12 Mar 2017.

Why Augsburg?

  • Fugger family legacy
  • Martin Luther and the Reformation legacy
  • Water supply management, newly inscribed World Heritage Site

I had come to Augsburg to find and understand traces Martin Luther left behind in the city. What I learned was the extent of the lasting legacy provided by the Fugger family, and how the city has for centuries provided safe clean water to her citizens, and how that water management system has become world-renowned as a piece of cultural heritage, forming the basis of an application for recognition as a World Heritage Site.

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Hafelekar, Nordkette, Nordkette cable car, Nordkettenbahn, Hungerburg funicular, Hungerburgbahn, Innsbruck, Tirol, Tyrol, Oesterreich, Austria, fotoeins.com

Tirol Tour: short jumps from Innsbruck

As one of nine states within the federal republic of Austria, Tirol is well known not only for all-season access to the Alps, but also for a variety of other attractions. With the state capital city of Innsbruck serving as home base, I explored the city on foot, and the following parts of the state with train and bus:

  1. Alpbach,
  2. Brenner,
  3. Hall in Tirol,
  4. Nordkette,
  5. Scharnitz,
  6. Stubaital, and
  7. Wilder Kaiser (Going, Ellmau, Scheffau).

For each location, I list the “why” (you should visit) and the “how” (you can get there from Innsbruck). I had specific goals, including a search for a Nobel Prize laureate, visit with friends, and expansion of a long-term photography project.

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Am Quicken, Klais, Krün, Mittenwald, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Upper Bavaria, Oberbayern, Bavaria, Bayern, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Am Quicken im Schnee (Mittenwald)

The town of Klais has over one thousand years of history. That’s not obvious looking out from the train passing through between Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Mittenwald. But within easy reach on foot are the ruins of the Scharnitz monastery, the remnant of a Roman road, and open fields with views like the one above to Wettersteinspitzen.

(The approach on foot in winter is possible on groomed paths from Mittenwald or from Klais itself.)

I made the picture above on 1 March 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/20, ISO1000, 47mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aMa.

Fasching, Maschkera, Oimrausch: pre-Lent shenanigans in southern Germany

This ain’t no Hallowe’en1.

This is Fasching and Maschkera in southern Germany. It’s also about about distinctions and differences by comparison with Karneval on the Rhein.

Festivities take place before Catholic Lent, and the key idea behind the wild colourful costumes and wooden masks is the very pagan origin and ritual of driving out or driving away evil spirits of winter lurking inside people and their homes and welcoming the friendly spirits of spring for a productive growing season.

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