Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘river’

Guthrie Theater, Gold Medal Flour, Mill City Museum, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Guthrie and the Gold Medal

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota. I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

The “Gold Medal Flour” is a city landmark associated with the Mill City Museum and the history and economic impact of flour mills. Next door is another city landmark that is the Guthrie Theater; visitors can step inside to gaze at the architecture and interior design, as well as panorama views over the city and Mississippi River.

I made the photo above on 11 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gn1.

Stone Arch Bridge, Central Mississippi Riverfront Regional Park, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Stone Arch Bridge in winter sun

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota. I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

On a walk through the “Old Town,” I slipped through two condominium buildings onto a small open space facing north onto a riverside park and the Stone Arch Bridge. Situated next to St. Anthony Falls, the bridge is a bicycle and pedestrian bridge traversing the Mississippi River and connecting downtown Minneapolis with the Marcy-Holmes neighbourhood.

I made the photo above on 11 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/16, ISO2000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glH.

Mississippi River, University of Minnesota, Washington Avenue Pedestrian Bridge, downtown Minneapolis, I-35, winter, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Minni skyline, Mississippi ice

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota (U of M). I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

With my return onto the U of M’s East Bank, I reacquainted myself with the Washington Avenue Bridge, connecting the university campus on both sides of the Mississippi river. I forgot how good the illuminated skyline looks over the river with floating ice. The view shown here faces northwest: at left is the downtown Minneapolis skyline; at right are the Northern Pacific Rail Bridge Number 9, now used for bicycles and pedestrians, and the I-35W Saint Anthony Falls Bridge.

I made the photo above on 8 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, 14mm focal length (21mm full-frame equivalent with the WCL-X70). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gle.

Worms’ Holy Sand: Europe’s oldest surviving Jewish cemetery

I’m looking for a “thousand-year history” in the city of Worms located in southwest Germany. This has nothing to do helminthology or nematology, as the town’s name is derived from “Warmaisa”, the former Jewish name of the city. This is about an important part of Jewish-German history and peaceful coexistence of the Judeo-Christian communities within Europe. The town’s fame and reputation is also partly derived from Martin Luther; I’ve already visited the site where Luther was on trial to answer charges of heresy, as well as the world’s largest Reformation monument.

This part of the Rhein river area is considered the “cradle of European Jewry”, known also as “little Jerusalem on the Rhine.” In medieval times, flourishing Jewish communities in the cathedral cities of Speyer, Worms, and Mainz facilitated the creation of a common Jewish league with the name ShUM (SchUM), spelled out by the first letters of the Hebrew names for the three cities. To emphasize the influence of Jewish heritage in Europe and to continue the ongoing process of preservation and education, the recent application by Germany for the ShUM cities to be inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site is at present in the Tentative list (2019).

On a breezy late-autumn afternoon, light fades quick, casting solemn shadows on this ground. In the town’s old Jewish cemetery, I’m the only person present, and I’ve placed a small stone on top of a number of gravestones. I’m surrounded by apparitions over an millennium’s age and by the remaining physical traces in various shapes, stones, and size.

( Click here for images and more )

Blautopf, Blaubeuren, Blau river, Ulm, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday um Ulm herum: Blautopf Blaubeuren

In Ulm, um Ulm, und um Ulm herum

That’s a well-known “Zungenbrecher” (literally, “tongue breaker” or tongue-twister) which translates as “In (the city of) Ulm, around Ulm, and round about Ulm”.

Ulm is located in southern Germany in the federal state of Baden-Württemberg. In the nearby town of Blaubeuren, there is the URMU or Urgeschichtliches Museum with important local archaeological finds highlighting prehistoric human civilization. There is also an unusual deep lake called Blautopf whose waters rise from the deep and appear very blue. The Blautopf is also the source of the Blau river which flows through Ulm’s Fischerviertel (Fisherman’s Quarter) before converging with the Danube.

Blaubeuren is a short 15-minute trip with a regional train from Ulm. From the Blaubeuren train station, there’s a 1.7 kilometre (1.1 mile) walk northeast to the Blautopf. There is also (limited) bus service between “Blaubeuren, Bahnhof” and “Blaubeuren, Museum.”

I made the photo above on 26 September 2017 with a Canon 6D mark1, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/125-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-dBS.

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