Fotoeins Fotografie

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Posts tagged ‘Germany UNESCO World Heritage Sites’

Osterspai, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Osterspai

24 May 2016.

This image is of the town of Osterspai, near “kilometre 575” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland). In town at left-centre is the Catholic St. Martin’s church, first established in town in 1076 AD/CE. Accompanying the scene are two river boats and two bicyclists in the foreground.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops allows further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I show images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/160-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 70mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-hMk.

St. Goarshausen, Burg Katz, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Sankt Goarshausen

24 May 2016.

This image is of the town of Sankt Goarshausen, near “kilometre 556” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland). Above town (at upper right) is historical landmark Burg Katz, a reconstruction of a medieval castle and is under private ownership.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops allows further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I portray images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 75mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-hMa.

Kaub, Burg Gutenfels, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Kaub, Gutenfels

24 May 2016.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops allows further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I portray images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

This image is of the town of Kaub, near “kilometre 546” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland). Above town sits historical landmark Burg Gutenfels on the slope accompanied by vineyards.

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/200-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 50mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-hLW.

Lorch am Rhein, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Lorch am Rhein

24 May 2016.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops along the way allow further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I portray images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

This image is of the town of Lorch am Rhein, at “kilometre 540” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland).

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/160-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 55mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-fYw.

Worms: Holy Sand, Europe’s oldest surviving Jewish cemetery

I’m looking for a “thousand-year history” in the city of Worms located in southwest Germany. This has nothing to do helminthology or nematology, as the town’s name is derived from “Warmaisa”, the former Jewish name of the city. This is about an important part of Jewish-German history and peaceful coexistence of the Judeo-Christian communities within Europe. The town’s fame and reputation is also partly derived from Martin Luther; I’ve already visited the site where Luther was on trial to answer charges of heresy, as well as the world’s largest Reformation monument.

This part of the Rhein river area is considered the “cradle of European Jewry”, known also as “little Jerusalem on the Rhine.” In medieval times, flourishing Jewish communities in the cathedral cities of Speyer, Worms, and Mainz facilitated the creation of a common Jewish league with the name ShUM (SchUM), spelled out by the first letters of the Hebrew names for the three cities. As emphasis on the influence of Jewish heritage in Europe and the ongoing process of preservation and education, the Holy Sand cemetery is one of four constituents in the newly inscribed UNESCO World Heritage Site (2021).

On a breezy late-autumn afternoon, light fades quick, casting solemn shadows on this ground. In the town’s old Jewish cemetery, I’m the only person present, and I’ve placed a small stone on top of a number of gravestones. I’m surrounded by apparitions over an millennium’s age and by the remaining physical traces in various shapes, stones, and size.

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Before Bauhaus: Alfeld Fagus Factory, UNESCO WHS

Before Bauhaus found its first footing in Weimar, there was in the town of Alfeld in central Germany the Fagus-Werk factory building.

The Fagus factory building is looked upon as the first building in the world for the modern architectural age, and is the predecessor to the elegant 1926 Bauhaus headquarters building in Dessau. Fagus company founder Karl Benscheidt commissioned architect and future Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius, to create and build a shoe-making factory as an artistic project. Gropius and his collaborator Adolf Meyer stuck with working floor-plans by architect Eduard Werner, and set their sights on new exterior and interior designs. Completed in 1911, the factory’s office building set a new standard for 20th-century industrial architecture with steel and glass construction and tall unsupported windows at the corners of the building.

“Fagus” is Latin for “beech tree”, and shoemaking began with shoe lasts or moulds constructed from beech wood, which were sold and distributed around the world to other companies for the productions of shoes. In the 1920s, Benscheidt developed the turning precision-lathe speeding up production, prompting growth and expansion and elevating the company to world’s top producer of shoe lasts. Today, the building is still a working factory: Fagus creates plastic lasts milled by automated machinery to precise specifications for specific designs by shoe companies. Also on-site is GreCon which produces systems for fire-detection and fire-extinguishing in industrial settings. The Fagus factory building was recognized as “unique living monument” and inscribed by UNESCO as World Heritage Site (Welterbe) in 2011.

With a population of over 20-thousand people, Alfeld is located in the German federal state of Lower Saxony. The town’s reach by train is 30-minutes from Hannover or 40-minutes from Göttingen, after which is a short 5- to 10-minute walk from Alfeld(Leine)1 train station to the entrance of the Fagus/GreCon complex. Visitors can walk around the working factory site, stop at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre, sit in the neighbouring café for coffee or tea, and visit the museum dedicated to the building’s origins, the building’s century-long history of shoe-making, and a general history of footwear.

Walter Gropius and others would move to Weimar to establish a centre of art, design, thought, and attitude for Bauhaus in 1919, eight years after inauguration of the Fagus-Werk.

Die Baukunst soll ein Spiegel des Lebens und der Zeit sein.
(Architecture should be a mirror to life and its time.)

– Walter Gropius.

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My Germany: 33 (of 51) UNESCO WH Sites

Above: Cologne at dusk, 26 May 2016 (6D1).

Every year UNESCO-Welterbetag (UNESCO World Heritage Day) in Germany is celebrated on the first Sunday in June. I highlight below 33 UNESCO World Heritage Sites (WHS) in Germany from a list of 51 inscriptions.

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Hamburg: Miniatur Wunderland, where tiny rules large

Above/featured: Miniature Hamburg with Heinrich Hertz tower at left, and Dammtor station at lower-centre.

Our family couldn’t afford the purchase of (or the space for) miniature railway sets. Christmas was a special time and with my nose pressed against shop windows, I’d dream of the world of the railroad set.

Hamburg’s Miniature Wonderland is big on wonder, has plenty of extensive miniature sets, and does not skimp on discoveries for people of all ages. Very little on the outside tells anybody passing by that there’s another world inside. Many aren’t fooled nor are they turned away. Miniature Wonderland was voted the most popular of 100 attractions in Germany in 2016, after 40-thousand international visitors were polled by the German National Tourist Board.

Built from 1883 to 1927, Hamburg’s Speicherstadt or Warehouse District was an important place in an increasingly busy port for the storage of dry goods from around the world. The Miniature Wonderland museum opened in the building called Block D on 16 August 2001. The historical Speicherstadt was inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015.

Miniatur Wunderland, MiWuLa, Miniature Wonderland, Speicherstadt, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Welterbe, Weltkulturerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Modelleisenbahn Wunderland (model railway wonderland); Block D, from street-level at Kehrwieder 2-4.


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Augustinerkloster, Augustinian Monastery, Erfurt, Thüringen, Thuringia, Germany, fotoeins.com

Erfurt: Martin Luther’s start at the Augustine Monastery

You can almost imagine a 16th-century monk walking these halls, contemplating various aspects of spirituality, and reconciling them with the hardships of everyday living.

In the federal state of Thuringia in central Germany, the Augustinerkloster (Augustine monastery) in Erfurt is a notable place for the history of Martin Luther and the Reformation.

Martin Luther arrived in 1501 and began studies in liberal arts, law, and theology at Erfurt University. In 1505, Luther experienced a big personal event (the scare of his life, as legend goes), and decided to leave his studies by entering the Augustine Monastery to become a monk, much to his father’s displeasure and objections. Built originally around 1300, the Augustine Monastery was home for Martin Luther until 1511, and it’s here where he was ordained as a priest. The site underwent extensive post-war reconstruction after suffering heavy bombing damage in the Second World War. The monastery is now a seminary and a modest hotel: guided tours of the monastery provide a glimpse to Luther’s early years as a monk, and visitors can now reserve rooms for overnight stays in a no-frills technology-free setting and a peaceful comfortable environment.

Erfurt’s Augustinian monastery is listed as one of many additional candidate sites for inclusion into a single UNESCO World Heritage Site under the title Luther memorials in Saxony-Anhalt, Saxony, Bavaria, and Thuringia.

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Northeast corner of old Roman fort, Regensburg, photo by Dr. Bernd Gross, Wiki CC3

Regensburg: remnants of Castra Regina on the Danube Limes

Above: former wall at the northeast corner of the Roman fort Castra Regina. Photo by Dr. Bernd Gross (image no. 7, Wiki CC3).

Regensburg is situated in central Bavaria, and is 1 and 1.5 hours from Nürnberg (Nuremberg) and München (Munich), respectively, with the train. While meandering through the Regensburg’s Old Town, it’s easy to forget most of this area was once occupied by a Roman fortress about 1800 years ago.

In 179 AD/CE, the Roman Empire established the fortress “Castra Regina”, or “fortress by the river Regen”, where the Regen enters the Danube river. The Danube became in effect a part of the Roman Empire’s northern frontier (“Danube Limes”). Emperor Marcus Aurelius recognized the need for extra security in the northern imperial province of Raetia where the Danube’s course reached its northernmost point. To ward off incursions by northern Germanic tribes, up to six thousand soldiers from the Third Italic Legion were stationed at the fortress.

At peak operation, the fortress encompassed an area 540 metres by 450 metres (24 hectares, or 60 acres) with a wall up to 10 metres (33 feet) high made of large sandstone blocks, 18 towers, 4 double-tower gates, and a wide trench. Within the grounds were barracks, headquarters building (principia), commanding officer’s own residence (praetorium), a military hospital (valetudinarium), granary (horrea), workshops, and stables. Civilians and support tradesmen built a settlement to the west of the fort. By the 5th-century, constant raids and migrations forced the Romans to abandon the area. A civilian settlement eventually grew over the fortress which is today’s Altstadt (Old Town)1.

The free-of-charge open-air museum includes restored remnants of the old Roman fortress complete with information displays in both English and German. The primary information location is at the parking garage at Dachauplatz (which is closed at night); the other three locations are accessible outdoors at any time.

The Porta Praetoria is one of multiple constituents in the tri-nation (AT DE SK) inscription for “Frontiers of the Roman Empire: Danube Limes” as UNESCO World Heritage Site (new, as of July 2021).

The map below shows the location of the Castra Regina encampment and locations of the “document Legionslagermauer” in the city’s Old Town. Click on the “arrow-window” icon at the upper-left corner of the map for additional details.

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