Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Fujifilm X70’

Uptown Diner, Uptown, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Uptown Diner

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota. I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

I lived the entire time in what is colloquially known as Uptown, known also as Lowry Hill or East Isles. But “Uptown” was good enough with a mix of different people, little restaurants and cafés, a variety of commercial activity, a synagogue, temples to religion and drink, and small lakes within easy walking reach. Whether the `hood has gotten too hip for its own good is left as an exercise to the interested reader.

But better that a working diner served as reminder of Dad’s working heritage. The Uptown Diner goes 24 hours on the weekends; that breakfast- or burger-platter at 2am hit the spot, before waddling that final block back to the apartment building.

I made the photos on 14 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gn9.

Uptown Diner, Uptown, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Left: “The Minnesotan” omelette (3 eggs, wild rice, sausage, onions, tomato, Swiss cheese), hash browns, & toast. Right: bison burger with green salad.

Guthrie Theater, Gold Medal Flour, Mill City Museum, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Guthrie and the Gold Medal

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota. I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

The “Gold Medal Flour” is a city landmark associated with the Mill City Museum and the history and economic impact of flour mills. Next door is another city landmark that is the Guthrie Theater; visitors can step inside to gaze at the architecture and interior design, as well as panorama views over the city and Mississippi River.

I made the photo above on 11 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gn1.

My Seattle: Chris Cornell

Above/featured: Customers’ contributions on the walls of Beth’s Cafe (Phinney Ridge) – 7 Mar 2020.

Where: Seattle, WA, USA.
Who: Chris Cornell.
Why: A search for traces he left behind in his birth city.

On 21 April 1991, an album of music both memorial and celebratory in nature was released, and changed not only the nature of rock at the time, but also the lives of many, both inside and outside the music industry. In the days and weeks after Andrew Wood’s death in March 1990, a group of people gathered to mourn and remember; they wrote new compositions and sang their songs. Temple of the Dog was born: the release of their self-titled album on that early-spring day in 1991 would be the only full-length album to the band’s name.

Decades later, the album’s 3rd track “Hunger Strike” is as compelling now as the first time the music video dropped in 1992 to grab my eyeballs and the harmony-melody-guitar-crunch latched onto my ears and brain. For lead singer Chris Cornell, intervening years included critical acclaim and success with Soundgarden and Audioslave, among solo efforts and other collaborations. Hours after performing on tour with Soundgarden, Cornell was found dead in his Detroit hotel room on 18 May 2017, shocking the community within Seattle and the community inside music at large; he was a young 52. Wherever they may be, that jam session with Cornell, Kurt Cobain, Layne Staley, and Andrew Wood has got to be one for the ages.

21 April 2021 is the 30th anniversary of the release of Temple of the Dog’s eponymous album.


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Stone Arch Bridge, Central Mississippi Riverfront Regional Park, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Stone Arch Bridge in winter sun

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota. I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

On a walk through the “Old Town,” I slipped through two condominium buildings onto a small open space facing north onto a riverside park and the Stone Arch Bridge. Situated next to St. Anthony Falls, the bridge is a bicycle and pedestrian bridge traversing the Mississippi River and connecting downtown Minneapolis with the Marcy-Holmes neighbourhood.

I made the photo above on 11 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/16, ISO2000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glH.

Mississippi River, University of Minnesota, Washington Avenue Pedestrian Bridge, downtown Minneapolis, I-35, winter, Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in MSP: Minni skyline, Mississippi ice

Between 2003 and 2006, I spent three memorably enjoyable years in Minneapolis and working at the University of Minnesota (U of M). I visited the Twin Cities as one of many destinations during my year-long RTW in 2012, and I returned again briefly in 2019 to see what became of the city.

With my return onto the U of M’s East Bank, I reacquainted myself with the Washington Avenue Bridge, connecting the university campus on both sides of the Mississippi river. I forgot how good the illuminated skyline looks over the river with floating ice. The view shown here faces northwest: at left is the downtown Minneapolis skyline; at right are the Northern Pacific Rail Bridge Number 9, now used for bicycles and pedestrians, and the I-35W Saint Anthony Falls Bridge.

I made the photo above on 8 March 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, 14mm focal length (21mm full-frame equivalent with the WCL-X70). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gle.

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