Fotoeins Fotografie

a question of home: 鹹水埠溫哥華? Oder woanders?

Posts tagged ‘European Route of Industrial Heritage’

Before Bauhaus: Alfeld Fagus Factory, UNESCO WHS

Before Germany’s Bauhaus found its first footing in Weimar, there was the Fagus-Werk in Alfeld.

The Fagus factory building is looked upon as the first building in the world for the modern architectural age, and is the predecessor to the elegant 1926 Bauhaus headquarters building in Dessau. Fagus company founder Karl Benscheidt commissioned architect and future Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius, to create and build a shoe-making factory as an artistic project. Gropius and his collaborator Adolf Meyer stuck with working floor-plans by architect Eduard Werner, and set their sights on new exterior and interior designs. Completed in 1911, the factory’s office building set a new standard for 20th-century industrial architecture with steel and glass construction and tall unsupported windows at the corners of the building.

“Fagus” is Latin for “beech tree”, and shoemaking began with shoe lasts or moulds constructed from beech wood, which were sold and distributed around the world to other companies for the productions of shoes. In the 1920s, Benscheidt developed the turning precision-lathe speeding up production, prompting growth and expansion and elevating the company to world’s top producer of shoe lasts. Today, the building is still a working factory: Fagus creates plastic lasts milled by automated machinery to precise specifications for specific designs by shoe companies. Also on-site is GreCon which produces systems for fire-detection and fire-extinguishing in industrial settings. The Fagus factory building was recognized as “unique living monument” and inscribed by UNESCO as World Heritage Site (Welterbe) in 2011.

With a population of over 20-thousand people, Alfeld is located in the German federal state of Lower Saxony. The town’s reach by train is 30-minutes from Hannover or 40-minutes from Göttingen, after which is a short 5- to 10-minute walk from Alfeld(Leine)1 train station to the entrance of the Fagus/GreCon complex. Visitors can walk around the working factory site, stop at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre, sit in the neighbouring café for coffee or tea, and visit the museum dedicated to the building’s origins, the building’s century-long history of shoe-making, and a general history of footwear.

Walter Gropius and others would move to Weimar to establish a centre of art, design, thought, and attitude for Bauhaus in 1919, eight years after inauguration of the Fagus-Werk.

Die Baukunst soll ein Spiegel des Lebens und der Zeit sein. (Architecture should be a mirror to life and its time.) – Walter Gropius.

( Click here for images and more )

salt-making, Halloren- und Salinemuseum Halle, Halloren, Salinemuseum, Halle (Saale), Halle, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Halle (Saale): Making White Gold Since 3000 BC

What do the following six towns and cities have in common?

  • Hall in Tirol, Austria
  • Hallein, Austria
  • Hallstatt, Austria
  • Schwäbisch Hall, Germany
  • Bad Reichenhall, Germany
  • Halle an der Saale, Germany

Where Hall is more than a large covered room

With “hall” in their names, all six towns listed above are historically associated with salt production1,2,3. The word “salt” is represented in Greek as hals and in Celtic (Brythonic) as hal. In pre-Roman Europe, the towns of Halle, Hallstatt, and Hallein were three centres for salt-evaporation4 which eventually became salt-making centres for the surrounding regions of Prussian Saxony, Salzkammergut, and Salzburg, respectively. Archaeological finds around Halle and along the Saale river5 uncovered evidence of heated brine (at Doläuer Heide) from the mid-neolithic age (about 3000 BCE) and briquetage ceramic vessels from the late-Bronze age (about 1000 BCE).

Mark Kurlansky wrote1: “… Salt is so common, so easy to obtain, and so inexpensive that we have forgotten that from the beginning of civilization until about 100 years ago, salt was one of the most sought after commodities in human history.

Once a rarity, salt was a unique additive to improve quality of food preparation and consumption. Food preservation with salt also became a critical measure for survival, but also for improving the quality of food preparation and consumption. Whoever controlled salt production, sales, and distribution held power, wealth, and prestige.

( Click here for more )

Lucia Weihnachtsmarkt in der Kulturbrauerei, Prenzlauer Berg, Kulturbrauerei, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Christmas at Berlin Kulturbrauerei

In Berlin’s “Kollwitzkiez” neighbourhood within the area known as Prenzlauer Berg1, a big Christmas market takes place inside the site of the former brewery Kulturbrauerei2. The Christmas market has a decidedly Scandinavian feel with the Swedish Lucia legend as the bringer of light at the beginning of a dark northern winter.

The 2016 version runs November 21 to December 22 inclusive. There is no charge for entry with operating hours: Monday to Friday from 3pm to 10pm, and weekends 1pm to 10pm. The nearest metro station is Eberswalder Straße (U-Bahn U2) with connections to rams 12, M1, and M10.

1At present this is contained within the Berlin administrative borough of Pankow.

2 The Kulturbrauerei is listed in the European Route of Industrial Heritage.

I made the photo above on 6 December 2015 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/50s, f/4, ISO16000, 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-95G.

Tempelhofer Freiheit, Flughafen Tempelhof, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Multimodal motion, Berlin Tempelhof

People in Berlin decided in a 2014 referendum against development and opted to retain the Tempelhof Airport as a park. On a good day in any season, there are bicycles, joggers, skateboarders, kite-flyers, people with model planes and drones. In warmer weather, couples are having picnics on the grass and groups are busy at various grill stations. The former airport was utilized as a giant green space called “Tempelhofer Feld” after the airport’s closure in 2008.


With public transport, it’s easy to reach the old Tempelhof airport:
U-Bahn – U6 to Paradestrasse, U8 to Leinestrasse;
S-Bahn – S41, S42, S45, S46 to Tempelhof Berlin.

A portion of the park was set aside in September 2015 for an emergency camp for refugees with plans for a controversial expansion, but the camp might eventually be closed.

I made the above photograph on 19 October 2012 with the Canon EOS450D, 18-55 IS II kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/80s, f/5.6, ISO200, 47mm focal length (75mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-7A0.

Spinnerei, Leipzig, Sachsen, Saxony, Germany, fotoeins.com

Leipzig Spinnerei: from cotton mill to arts centre

The Leipzig Spinnerei is a former cotton mill (Baumwollspinnerei) in the western industrial suburb of Plagwitz. The massive site at an area of 10 hectares (over 1 million square feet) with rows of factory buildings began operation in 1884 and eventually became the largest cotton mill in Europe with thousands working and living on-site. After the site ceased to produce spools of cotton thread shortly after reunification, artists took advantage of the cheap empty space, and transformed the area into studios, galleries, and exhibition halls. Much has been written about the impact and examples of art and space on Leipzig as the “new Berlin” as well as the “New Leipzig School.” The site as art and culture space celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2015.

( Click here for images and more )

%d bloggers like this: