Fotoeins Fotografie

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Posts tagged ‘Cologne’

Rheinboulevard, Rhine river, Rhein, Deutz, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Where am I? Smilla knows (Köln)

Smilla is a young friendly energetic Whippet who loves people and, above all, loves to run. But if I didn’t know any better, Smilla appears bored, resting her head on top of Y’s legs. It’s not entirely obvious where I made this shot. But look closer at the reflection in Smilla’s eyes …

We’re waiting for sunset in Cologne’s Deutz, seated at the Rheinboulevard on the east flank of the Rhine river just south of the Hohenzollern Bridge. Smilla is facing west across the river to the setting sun, the Dom (Cathedral), Saint Martin’s church, and the sun’s reflection on the waters of the Rhine.

Dogs, quietly they know everything …

Rheinboulevard, Rhine river, Rhein, Deutz, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Smilla’s reflection: me (HL), Cologne’s Cathedral (Dom), Great St. Martin’s church, and the Rhine river

I made the above photo on 25 May 2016 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 L zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/160s, f/11, ISO1000, 97mm focal-length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-8HW.

My Cologne: there’s a lighthouse that never goes out

“Why is there a lighthouse located in the middle of the city? That makes no sense!”

“Did the Rhine river once flow here? Is that why there’s a lighthouse?”

“Is the structure some kind of forgotten remnant of the past?”

“Maybe that’s not a lighthouse, but rather a beacon that lets people know about a fire somewhere in the neighbourhood.”

These are some of the questions and statements posed by Cologne residents when asked if they know anything about the lighthouse in their midst.

Located in the Ehrenfeld1 borough of Cologne is a red brick 44-metre (144-foot) high lighthouse. But why is there a lighthouse at all in the “middle” of Cologne? The Rhine river flows through the city, but the river is hardly visible from the lighthouse at a distance of about 3 kilometres (2 miles). The structure is not an actual operating lighthouse; it’s a symbol of early 20th-century enterprise from what was once one of the most important companies in Europe and marking the location of a big factory that once manufactured electrical equipment including maritime lights.

Founded in 1882, Helios2 established their presence in the town of Ehrenfeld before the latter was incorporated into the greater city of Cologne in 1888. The company once boasted a staff complement of over 2000 people, with products sold in Germany and Europe ranging from electrical generators and transformers, light bulbs, light fixtures in public spaces, and electrical streetcars. Helios also built light towers for the North and Baltic Sea coastlines, including ones at Roter Sand (Weser river estuary), Borkum and Wangerooge (East Frisian Islands), and Sylt. The onsite lighthouse in Ehrenfeld was constructed as a testing facility and never used as a navigational aid or marker. The company overextended its financial reach until Berlin’s AEG3 purchased Helios in 1905. Manufacturing operations in Ehrenfeld ceased in 1930, bringing a final end to Helios’ business presence in Cologne.

The present-day buildings which remain are used as office- and art-space. As historical landmark, the “Helios Leuchtturm” remains as part of the urban heritage in Ehrenfeld and Cologne. If the people in both borough and city have any final say in the matter, the lighthouse will never have to go out.4


Helios Leuchtturm, Helios AG, Ehrenfeld, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Heliosstrasse at Vogelsanger Strasse (HL 20160524)

Helios Leuchtturm, Helios AG, Ehrenfeld, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Unlit tower in silhouette at dusk (HL 20130114)

Heliosturm in Köln-Ehrenfeld (Wiki), by Superbass

Helios lighthouse at night (by Superbass on Wikimedia)


To check out the Helios lighthouse in my favourite Cologne neighbourhood1 of Ehrenfeld, take the following KVB public transport services from Köln Hauptbahnhof (Cologne main station):

•   train RE 1, 8, 9; RB 27, 38 to station Köln-Ehrenfeld.
•   tram 3, 4, or 13 to stop Venloer Strasse/Gürtel.

Additional coverage:

•   Die Helios-Werke, aus dem Buch “111 Kölner Orte, die man gesehen haben muss” (by Bernd Imgrund & Britta Schmitz, in German).
•   “Das Leuchtfeuer von Ehrenfeld,” Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger (in German).
•   Die Helios-Story, koeln.de (in German).
•   Rheinische Industriekultur (in German).
•   “Ehrenfeld statt Sansibar”, Deutschlandfunk (in German).
•   “Only in Cologne (2nd edition),” Duncan J.D. Smith (The Urban Explorer, 2014), in English.
•   Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: Cologne, in English.

1   “mein Kölner Kiez”, my Cologne `hood (HL).
2   Helios Aktiengesellschaft für elektrisches Licht und Telegraphenanlagenbau, or Company for Electrical Lights and Telegraphs.
3   Allgemeine Elektricitäts-Gesellschaft, or General Electric Company.
4   “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out”, The Smiths.

I made the first three photos above in January 2013 and May 2016. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-8nX.

Blick heben, Foto Gregor, Neumarkt, Köln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Blick heben (look up) in Cologne

The phrase on the pavement compels passers-by to ‘look up’ …

  1. A Rolleiflex camera, one about which I’ve begun dreaming of owning one day …
  2. On the ledge sits a photographer with a big-ass zoom, doing whatever they can to get “the shot” (over Neumarkt)
  3. two (headless?) Santa Claus’ climbing the wall, when really, one of them should be handing me a 5D Mark 3 …

Or the fact that I should part some cash over to Foto Gregor.
(Oder vielleicht soll ich etwas Geld beim Fotohaus Foto Gregor ausgeben …)

I made this photo on 6 January 2013 with the Canon EOS450D (XSi), EF-S 18-55 IS II zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/40s, f/5.6, ISO800, 55mm focal-length (88mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-7fz.

My Cologne : ‘Geist-Bock’ with 1. FC Köln, RheinEnergie Stadion

“Gute Laune, Laute Stimme”: the experience has me hooked.

I’m among men and women, young and old, swimming in a sea of red and white, and surrounded by full-volume chanting. Not only is it a big deal to procure a “Stehplatz” (standing spot) for under € 20, but to be present in the stadium’s standing-only terraces is a big thrill. The terraces are present in German football stadia but banned in England (for historical reasons). I’m convinced I’m going to memorize their famous fan anthem as quickly as possible.

Founded on 13 February 1948, the football (soccer) team 1. FC Köln plays out of the Rhein-Energie-Stadion (Rhine Energy Stadium) in Cologne. The stadium’s maximum capacity is about fifty-thousand, and the football side regularly sells out their home matches. The team’s mascot is a billy goat (Geissbock) for its steadfast stubborn perseverance. I’m also convinced there’s another “Kölle” verbal pun. “Geist-bock” is a compound noun consisting of “Geist” for (team-, fan-) spirit, and “Bock” for the people’s stubborn steadfast support. Various generations of “Hennes”, the mascot goat, have appeared on the sideline for home matches, and the mascot is prominent in the team badge’s and familiar red-and-white home kit (jersey).

RheinEnergie-Stadion Südseite. Im Vordergrund Fußballspieler auf der Jahnwiese im Rahmen des „Come-Together-Cup“ 2011, photo by Raimond Spekking, on Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 4.0

RheinEnergie-Stadion, photo by Raimond Spekking (Wiki)


2006

4. Dezember 2006: 2. Liga, 15. Spieltag (2nd Division, 15th Round).
1. FC Köln lose 1—3 at home to MSV Duisburg.

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Rhein Energie” (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Pre-match warm-up activities (HL)
1. FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Unter Freunden | among friends (HL)


2008

10. Oktober 2008: 1. Liga, 8. Spieltag (1st Division, 8th Round).
1. FC Köln blank visitors FC Energie Cottbus by a score of 1—0.

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Stadium view east through the foliage to the Cologne Cathedral (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Zeig’ Rassismus die Rote Karte!” | “Show Racism the Red Card!” campaign (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

First-half action (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Home-side leads 1-nil, early in the second-half (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

1. FC Köln players acknowledge home crowd after 1-nil victory (HL)

“Mer stonn zo Dir, FC Kölle”

The anthem is written and performed in the Kölsch dialect by local band Höhner. The German translation (Deutsche Übersetzung) is provided here and here. American Geissbock provides an English translation. The following is the song text in Kölsch.

Iehrefeld, Raderthal, Nippes, Poll, Esch, Pesch un Kalk
üvverall jitt et Fans vom FC Kölle
en Rio, en Rom, Jläbbisch, Prüm un Habbelrath
üvverall jitt et Fans vom FC Kölle

Freud oder Leid, Zokunft un Verjangenheit
e Jeföhl da verbingk – FC Kölle
Ov vör ov zoröck – neues Spiel heiß` neues Jlöck
e Jeföhl dat verbingk – FC Kölle

Mer Schwöre Dir he op Treu un op Iehr:
Mer stonn zo Dir FC Kölle
un mer jon met Dir wenn et sin muß durch et Füer
halde immer nur zo Dir FC Kölle!

Jung oder alt – ärm oder rich
zesamme simmer stark FC Kölle
Durch dick und durch dünn – janz ejal wohin
nur zesamme simmer stark FC Kölle!

Mer Schwöre Dir he op Treu un op Iehr:
Mer stonn zo Dir FC Kölle
un mer jon met Dir wenn et sin muß durch et Füer
halde immer nur zo Dir FC Kölle!

Mer Schwöre Dir he op Treu un op Iehr:
Mer stonn zo Dir FC Kölle
un mer jon met Dir wenn et sin muß durch et Füer
halde immer nur zo Dir FC Kölle!


From domradio.de: the video below from inside the Cologne Cathedral shows the anthem performed during Sunday mass to inaugurate the 2016-2017 season; see also the video of Sunday mass to open the 2015-16 season.


The RheinEnergie Stadion is easily reached from Cologne city centre with KVB public transport light rail (Stadtbahn) line 1 to station “Rheinenergie-Stadion”.

Disclosure: No Connection, Unpaid, My Own Opinions. I have not received any compensation for writing this content and I have no material connection to the 1. FC Köln organization, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, or the city of Cologne. With the exception of the stadium photo, I made the other photos on 4 December 2006, 18 October 2008, and 14 January 2013. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5yG.

Kölner Dom, Hohenzollernbrücke, Köln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Cologne’s two grand landmarks

Give them any excuse, the people in Köln (Cologne) love to party at any time. It’s a wonder but no surprise this is where I find some of the happiest people in the country. As the calendar flips to a new year, the time heralds the annual shenanigans of the Kölner Karneval. For residents and visitors, two of the best-known landmarks in the city are the Kölner Dom (Cologne Cathedral) and the Hohenzollernbrücke (Hohenzollern Bridge).

( Click here for more )

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