Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Aotearoa’

Treaty of Waitangi, Te Papa, Wellington, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: New Zealand Treaty of Waitangi

In New Zealand, February 6 is a public national holiday known as Waitangi Day, marking the 1840 signing between the English and the Maori of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi). This treaty became the founding document for present-day New Zealand. While Maoris and non-Maoris coexist in relatively good, peaceful, and cooperative terms, the language providing guidance from the Treaty of Waitangi and the “appropriate translation” remain contentious. What happens next will pave the way forward not only for the future of New Zealand, but also for native and non-native cooperation and relations for other nations in the south Pacific. The Archives New Zealand holds the “original” paper and parchment documents which make up the Treaty of Waitangi.

A second nation-wide referendum was held in 2016 on a choice between the existing national flag and a new version for the flag. With voter turnout at almost 68-percent and over 2.1 million votes cast, the people of New Zealand voted to retain the existing flag by a 57-to-43 margin. Other commonly seen flags for the country are described here.


I made composite photos above of the display representing the Treaty of Waitangi display at the national Te Papa Museum in Wellington, New Zealand on 13 October 2010. First appearing here, the present post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9od.

Te Whanganui a Tara, Port Nicholson, Wellington Victoria, Mount Victoria, tangi te keo, Wellington, New Zealand, Aotearoa, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: New Zealand, new day, new year

Along with Kiribati, Tokelau, Samoa, Tonga, and Fiji, New Zealand is one of the first countries west of the international date line to witness sunrise and, on the first of January, to celebrate a brand new year. In the photo above, the day’s early light illuminates Wellington Harbour (Te Whanganui a Tara) and Lower Hutt in the distance, as a Bluebridge ferry begins its journey out of the harbour to cross Cook Strait for Picton on the South Island.

•   one Māori legend about Wellington harbour
•   click here for my Interislander ferry trip across Cook Strait
•   click here for a beaut of a sunrise over Wellington

I made the photo above on 12 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, EF-S 18-55 IS kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/640s, f/5.6, ISO200, 55mm (88mm full-frame equivalent) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com at http://wp.me/p1BIdT-7vp.

New Zealand, true-colour image from NASA Terra satellite, December 2002.

New Zealand: Māori anthems Pokarekare Ana, E Ihowa Atua

New Zealand is located in a part of our planet that’s about as far as one can go. The country provides easy inspiration with her striking scenery and friendly people. Memories remain sharp and fresh after multiple visits to Wellington and Auckland, as well as a solid three weeks in early-winter on the South Island. Truth is: I’m in love with “Aotearoa“. The longer I’m in country, the more the land reveals deeper insights about her culture and language.

New Zealand has three official languages: English, Māori, and New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL). Immediate connections to this land are two Māori songs, “Pokarekare Ana” and “E Ihowa Atua”, which are the unofficial and official national anthems, respectively.

( Click here for more )

Food Alley, Auckland, New Zealand

Mum’s cooking at Auckland’s Food Alley

Long distance recollections

A number of years ago, I stopped in Auckland, New Zealand for a few days on my way back from Sydney, Australia to La Serena, Chile.

I was stunned to find mum’s cooking.

I immediately called mum in Vancouver to let her know someone stole her recipe for claypot rice.

She was skeptical and told me to get back to Vancouver for the real thing.

I told her the commute back home from the southern hemisphere was a little rough, but I’d be back to visit in a few months …

The holy urban trinity

It might be an odd combination, but when I’m in a city for the first time, I look for three things: green spaces, art spaces, and decent food.

With subsequent visits to Auckland, I’m happy to have found all three in New Zealand’s largest city.

Getting around Auckland isn’t as difficult as it might seem, as various Link Bus services are an inexpensive and effective way of getting around the city for both residents and visitors. After my visit to the Auckland Domain and the Auckland Museum, I step off the Inner Link bus on Albert Street, and I make the short way to Food Alley for dinner.

Food Alley in Auckland’s CBD

Recommended as a cheap-eat by various sources including the New Zealand Herald, Food Alley is an unassuming looking no-nonsense food court, consisting of Chinese, Japanese, Indian, Indonesian, Korean, Malaysian, Thai, and Vietnamese stalls.

While some might express disapproval at eating in a food court, Food Alley is similar to the Cooked Food Centres (the old “dai pai dong”) in Hong Kong or the hawker centres in Singapore. Drawing comparisons with southeast Asia is a very good thing.

In late-afternoon and early-evening, Food Alley is packed with people, and every stall is seeing some action.

This is a first indication of a good thing.

Many minutes of indecision ensued when faced with all of the choices. But I feel an invisible force tugging at my sleeves, and I’m “pulled” toward Claypot Rose, where a number of dishes are cooked in … well … claypots. They even include little pictures of how the dishes appeared.

Now, a common piece of wisdom is avoid places with pictures of food, but every stall in Food Alley has little pictures showing what they have on offer. But it’s busy here, and people are quiet as they’re digging eagerly into their food. They’re in animated conversation once their plates are empty.

This is the second indication this place is going to be good.

Food Alley, Auckland, New Zealand, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Chinese Clay Pot Rose

I remember looking into our family’s kitchen while mum prepared steamed chicken with ginger and Chinese sausage on a bed of rice and bok-choy. I see that memory come alive in front of me, the “claypot chicken rice with Chinese sausage” (煲仔雞臘腸飯) consisting of chunks of steamed chicken (雞) and sausage (臘腸), seasoned with ginger, garlic, soy sauce, and crowned generously with chopped green onion and red chiles. To augment my round of gluttony, I order an extra BBQ-pork egg foo yung.

Pure taste was my third indication and the ultimate clincher.

Like a question of what came first or, simply, what’s better, both chicken and egg are really good, but the claypot chicken rice brings me back to the past with the familiar flavours. I never thought I’d experience that taste outside of my childhood home, until I stepped into Food Alley and discovered the replicated stylings of mum’s cooking.

Address & Map for Food Alley

Food Alley is located in Auckland’s Central Business District at 9 Albert Street, just minutes on foot from Britomart Train Station. They’re open every day from 1030am to 10pm. The Link Bus, including the City-, Inner-, and Outer-Link services, runs in both directions on all routes with 10- to 20-minute frequencies every day until about 11pm.

Other recent commentary about Food Alley: The Selfish Years, and The Food Pornographer.

Disclosure: No Connection, Unpaid, My Own Opinions. I have not received any compensation for writing this content and I have no material connection to the brands, topics and/or products that are mentioned here. I made the photos above with a 4th-generation iPodTouch on 31 July 2012. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-3n0.

New Zealand: Fiordland’s Milford Sound

A trip to New Zealand’s South Island is incomplete without a visit to the Fiordland National Park. A stop at one or both of Milford Sound or Doubtful Sound is also highly recommended, as they are some of the most popular destinations in New Zealand and on the South Island. From Queenstown, I sided with Real Journeys for a daytrip out to Milford Sound: morning coach on the only road access, Milford Sound Highway (State Highway 94), from Queenstown to Milford Sound; a boat into the fiord; and the return to Queenstown by plane. The Maori Ngai Tahu name for the body of water is Piopiotahi (“one piopio bird”). The piopio resembles a thrush but is considered extinct with the last sighting in 1905.

Much of the scenery reminds me of my home province: coastal British Columbia. Carved by glacial activity, Fjords (also spelled “fiords”) are long narrow inlets with steep sides or cliffs. My time in southwest New Zealand reminds me of home along the southwest coast of British Columbia.

( Click here for images and more )

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