Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘Urban Photography’ category

My Seattle: murals in West Seattle

Above/featured: Facing east at The Junction: SW Alaska Street at California Avenue SW. At left (northeast corner) is the red-brick Campbell Building from 1911, oldest in the neighbourhood and a designated City of Seattle historic landmark since 2017.

What: Paintings depicting the history of West Seattle.
Where: In and around West Seattle’s The Junction.
Why: Arts project with community and pride.

Technically, West Seattle is an area consisting of several neighbourhoods within the city of Seattle. Historically, West Seattle feels separate, a peninsula separated from the centre by the flow of water and peoples along the Duwamish river valley. West Seattle had incorporated as its own city in 1902, before agreeing to annexation by Seattle in 1907.

One key to West Seattle is “The Junction”: an intersection of 2 former streetcar lines “West Seattle” and “Fauntleroy”. As expected, commercial activity took root at the intersection and although streetcars have vanished, the nickname has remained as a simple useful designation.

A product of West Seattle, retired businessman Earl Cruzen (1920-2017) launched a local arts and community project in the late-1980s, inspired after visiting other towns in Washington as well as Chemainus on British Columbia’s Vancouver Island. Cruzen promoted the project with support among residents and business owners, generated fundraising efforts, and brought American and Canadian artists into the city to paint wall murals to highlight the history of people along the Duwamish river and the history of West Seattle. A total of 11 murals were painted, dedicated, and unveiled between 1989 and 1993.

Over time, the murals deteriorated and faded without touchup or maintenance. Members of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society engaged the community in 2018 with questions about the murals, and about raising money to support revitalizing the murals. In May 2018, Adah Cruzen honoured her late-husband with a gift of 100-thousand dollars to the West Seattle Junction Association to boost the restoration process.

So, what do the murals mean to the people of West Seattle?


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Deutschordenshaus, House of the Teutonic Order, Deutscher Orden, Teutonic Order, Wien, Österreich, Vienna, Austria, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Vienna Old Town: Teutonic Order

In central Vienna, the Deutschordenshaus building is the world headquarters for the Order of the Teutonic Knights of St. Mary’s hospital in Jerusalem, also known as the Teutonic Order. The group has roots in the Third Crusade, established as a military hospital near the Mediterranean port city of Acre (Akko/Akka) around 1190 AD/CE. The Order established satellites all over Europe, including Vienna whose presence here was established in the early 13th-century. In 1809, the Order moved its headquarters to Vienna. Graced with 17th- and 18th-century design, the building today houses not only offices, but also its central archives and Treasury (Schatzkammer). As seen on the door in the image above, the Order’s symbol is the Cross of the Teutonic Order (Crux Ordis Teutonicorum), very much like the one visible at the 1st “Deutsches Eck” (German Corner) in Koblenz.

The Teutonic Order building is located within the city’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 2001.

Location: Singerstrasse 7. U-Bahn U1 or U3, Stephansplatz.

I made the photo above on 18 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/30-sec, f/6.4, ISO2000, 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glE.

My Munich: Ghost station Olympiastadion

In the vicinity of Munich’s Olympic Stadium is a train station overgrown with brush and weeds. The tracks stretch north and south, but go nowhere.

Munich played host to the Summer Olympics in 1972; physical reminders include the Olympiadorf (Olympic Village), Olympiapark, and the Olympiastadion (Olympic Stadium). In 1988, the train station “München Olympiastadion” closed to train service for the final time. Rail tracks which connected the station with the North Ring freight tracks were cut, isolating the station and leaving it to decay.

Since 2001, the Olympic Village has been listed as part of the heritage Olympiapark ensemble which includes the abandoned station. But will the station be left to decay? Or will the station be refurbished in some way to become a living memorial?

Historical maps of the MVV U- and S-Bahn system show how train service from central Munich to Olympic Stadium was utilized. S-Bahn train service carried passengers along the central trunk to Olympic Stadium via Hauptbahnhof, Laim, and Moosach; check out the system maps for June 1972 and June 1988.


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Türkenkugel, Ottoman cannonball, Am Hof, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Vienna Old Town: Ottoman cannonball

And I don’t mean the ’90s alt-rock classic from The Breeders.

What I mean is the gilded cannonball stuck to the side of a building in central Vienna. The shiny gold cannonball is a relic of the attempted and failed siege by military forces of the Ottoman (Turkish) Empire on Vienna in 1683; the name in German “Türkenkugel” is very literal at that (“Turkish cannon ball”). Today, this building is home to Austrian-Italian company Generali, which provides insurance and financial solutions for private customers.

Location: Am Hof 11 (Generali Versicherung AG Geschäftsstelle Am Hof). U-Bahn U3, Herrengasse. Am Hof is located within the city’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 2001.

I made the photo above on 20 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/10, ISO2000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gls.

My Vienna: Klimt, Moser, & Wagner in Hietzing Cemetery

Previously, I provided short biographies for artist Gustav Klimt, artist and designer Koloman Moser, and architect Otto Wagner, and why they are important figures to the arts and culture scene in early 20th-century Vienna. These three figures are buried in Hietzing Cemetery in the 13th district of Hietzing at the city’s western periphery.

Located to the southwest of the former imperial summer residence Schönbrunner Schlosspark, Hietzing Cemetery is modest in size with an area of over 9.7 hectares (24 acres) and containing over 11-thousand graves. With the present site inaugurated in 1787, the cemetery has seen several expansion phases and survived damage from the Second World War.

It’s an easy ride on the city’s U4 subway, formerly Otto Wagner’s municipal railway (Wiener Stadtbahn), to one of its stations at Hietzing. From Hietzing station, it’s a quick hop on a bus to the cemetery’s main gate.


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