Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘Night Photography’ category

Festival of Lights, Potsdamer Platz, Mauerfall, Berliner Mauer, Berlin Wall, Fall of the Wall, Berlin, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 5 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

With the annual Festival of Lights casting colour and patterns, I’m standing next to the first ever traffic signal in Germany (1924), just out of view to the left. What’s highlighted is a stripe on the pavement through the centre of the frame, with the camera view south to the south entrance to Potsdamer Platz train station. The imbedded brick stripe marks the former location of the “Vorderlandmauer“, the forward or boundary wall immediately next to West Berlin). Left of the stripe would have been East Berlin; to the right, West Berlin.

I made the image above on 14 October 2017 with a Canon 6D mark 1 and the following settings: 1/50-sec, f/4, ISO10000, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-fdf.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is to the left of the red line, and East Berlin is to the right of the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Potsdamer Platz, Berlin.de

Berliner Mauer, Potsdamer Platz: berlin.de.

Macy's, Bon Marche building, The Bon, Thanksgiving, holiday star, Seattle, Washington, USA, fotoeins.com

Seattle: Thanksgiving holiday star & fireworks

As a wae lad, I was fascinated by comparative branding and marketing, and that’s how I got to thinking about the differences and similarities between Canada’s Hudson’s Bay Company in greater Vancouver and the American Bon Marché in Bellingham and Seattle. But I don’t ever recall a tradition of lighting a star for October/Canadian Thanksgiving.

In downtown Seattle, a grand building opened in 1929 for the locally-owned Bon Marché department store, operating for over 7 decades until “The Bon” became Macy’s in 2005. A holiday star designed by Bob James in 1957 would become a fixture for the city and her residents. In September 2019, Macy’s declared the downtown Seattle location would be closing at the end of February 2020. At the time, the announcement included no plans for lighting the holiday star.

However, the star looks to be coming back for one more (final?) illumination, as a local lighting company agreed to refurbish and reassemble the star in time for the 2019 Thanksgiving season. Festivities occur Friday November 29, beginning with the annual Thanksgiving parade followed by the star’s lighting and fireworks.

•   MyNorthwest, 27 Nov 2019.

( Click here for images and more )

My Seattle: that tower again

“That Tower Again,” a three-word online phrase for the early 21st-century.

It’s a phrase I associate with Berlin and her TV Tower (Fernsehturm), and that comes with multiple stays and many months in the German capita, a city I feel very much at home (winters notwithstanding). With my return to the Canadian Southwest and near-proximity to Seattle, I reconsider my fondness for the city’s iconic landmark: the Space Needle observation tower. Sight of the tower hasn’t lost its allure since our first family visit in the late 1970s.

For the Seattle World Fair in 1962, construction of the Space Needle occurred over a mere 400 days in time for the “Century 21 Exposition”. The 605-foot (184 metre) tower stood for the spirit of innovation and the might of technology. The city of Seattle designated the tower as an official city landmark in 1999. Fast forward now into the 21st century, it’s unfathomable for resident and visitor alike to think about the Emerald City without its leading spire.

( Click here for images and more )

My Vienna: metro frame

Above/featured: Urania (1910), Aspernbrücke Bridge (1951), and Uniqa Tower (2005) from left to right – 16 May 2018, 6D1.

It’s easy to reduce a city to stereotypes, distilling landmarks to short paragraph summaries designed for easy consumption.

Some might say: you’re making things too complicated; they’ve got to be simpler. That misguided sentiment needlessly and carelessly minimizes the diversity and complexity of a city, her people, and the infrastructure through which citizens reside, navigate, and thrive. Although I chased after traces of Otto Wagner throughout Vienna, I’m also interested in illuminating the city as reflections from past and present and as glimpses of resident and visitor.

Vienna is an exceptional city

( Click here for images and more )

Ballgasse, dusk, Vienna, Wien, Old Town, UNESCO, World Heritage, Oesterreich, Austria, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna dusk over cobblestone Ballgasse

In this third of five installments, I highlight Vienna for Fotoeins Friday.

Ballgasse is a narrow cobblestone passage and one of the last remaining from medieval times, even though the surrounding buildings are much younger dating to the 18th-century. The lack of vehicles and periods of quiet chatter become a slow relaxed trip back in time. This short stretch of street is within Vienna’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 1996.

I made the picture above on 18 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/125-sec, f/4, ISO2500, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bRN.

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