Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between Canada & Germany

Posts from the ‘Hong Kong’ category

Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Tai Po street scene (Hong Kong)

12 June 2012.

This is Tai Po in the New Territories, and I’m walking southeast on Kwong Fuk Road (at Tsing Yuen Street). The white tower at left-centre is the Wing Shing Building (149-155 Kwong Fuk Road), and visible through the haze in the background is Ma On Shan (馬鞍山) mountain.

Where is everybody?

June in Hong Kong is hot and sticky, and on a blazing muggy afternoon, many are inside next to fans or air-conditioning. I’m one of the foolish few to wander the streets, but my reward is relatively empty streets framed by signage and street lines. There are “classic” Hong Kong elements: the row of air-con units outside and tucked next to windows, commercial signs big and small hanging over the street, familiar traditional Chinese words and characters, “no stopping” and “no left turn” signs to accompany driving on the left, aluminum scaffolding and bamboo poles, and women with open umbrellas to provide shade from the scorching sun.

During my year-long RTW, I made the photo above on 12 June 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/5, ISO100, and 43mm focal length (69mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9UT.

King's Road, Westlands Road, Quarry Bay, Hong Kong, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: a lunge into Quarry Bay (Hong Kong)

8 June 2012.

“Bonjour! (Hello!)”

Borrowing my sister’s 10-22 lens while I’m in Hong Kong for the month, I wonder how I might view the world through the fisheye lens. This view east on King’s Road from Westlands Road shows how the surrounding high-rise buildings “lean” towards the centre of the field. Like many highly populated cities in Asia, the parallels with “deep valleys” and “towering “walls” are all too clear. It’s also worth noting Quarry Bay was named for the small body of water on which most of present-day Quarry Bay is built with reclaimed land.


I made this photo during my year-long RTW on 8 June 2012 with the Canon 450D, 10-22 fisheye, and the following settings: 1/320-sec, f/8, ISO100, and 10mm focal length (16mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9W9.

Cheung Chau Wan, Cheung Chau Bay, Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Chorus line at Cheung Chau

21 July 2007.

Our ferry from Hong Kong pulls into Cheung Chau (長洲, “long island”). Across from us in the bay is a row of fishing boats, topped with red mainland-Chinese flags flapping in the wind. The line of red-and-yellow flags provide a visible reminder who is supposed to be running the place after the transition of Hong Kong’s governance in 1997 from the United Kingdom to China. The entire time I’m in Hong Kong, I never think about it. It’s curious how specific visuals emphasize the changes that’ve occurred and will continue to go on. But that fifty year span of the “one country, two systems” experiment runs to 2047 – what happens then?

I made the photo above with the Canon Powershot A510 on 21 July 2007. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-779.

Outside SOGO, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Outside SOGO”, HKG Causeway Bay

The action rarely stops in Causeway Bay, like many other parts of Hong Kong. To the left outside the frame, department store SOGO stands opposite the street-level entrance ‘E’ to the MTR metro station. It’s 730pm and “big-city commotion” hits you from all sides: people heading home from work, people heading to the shops or restaurants, cars, taxis, and the rumble of the famous streetcars on nearby Hennessy Road. Blue-shirted volunteers for UNICEF are gamely trying to get their pitch out for donations to their cause. At centre is a bright white billboard with an elegantly dressed wedded couple. The “husband” and the man below are facing the same direction, while the “bride” with a tiara looks out to people on the street. The tag line for Chow Tai Fook Jewellery (周大福) reads “The Perfect One.”

In the course of my year-long RTW, I made the photo above on 21 June 2012 with a Canon EOS450D, 18-55 IS kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/30s, f/4.5, ISO400, 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). The photo is an enlarged version of what appeared on Instagram. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-7YS.

Central and Kowloon, from The Peak: Hong Kong, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Hong Kong’s Peak view to Kowloon

As residents and careful visitors may know, the main difference between the view from The Peak Galleria and the view from the adjacent and more popular The Peak Tower is the price of admission. Entrance to the terrace level of the Peak Tower costs $45 HKD (or $5.80 USD), as of June 2014. Entrance to the observation deck of The Peak Galleria is free, even though the Galleria’s top deck is lower than the Tower’s top level. Despite differences in geometry and height, anybody can have an excellent view of Hong Kong Island below, across Victoria Harbour and beyond to Kowloon and The New Territories.

Have you visited Hong Kong? What’s your favourite memory from your visit? Please leave your comments below!

I made the photo above from The Peak Galleria on 19 June 2012. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

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