Fotoeins Fotografie

location bifurcation, place & home

Posts tagged ‘Te Waka o Aoraki’

Milford Sound, Piopiotahi, Fiordland National Park, Te Moana o Atawhenua, Southland, South Island, Te Wahipounamu, Te Wai Pounamu, Te Waipounamu, Te Waka a Maui, Te Waka o Aoraki, New Zealand, Aotearoa,

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty-one

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

25 July 2012.

Like many before me, I’ve purchased a package for a daytrip on New Zealand’s South Island. After a 5-hour ride from Queenstown on a large comfortable coach/bus, we arrive at Milford Sound (Piopiotahi) and hop onto a 2-hour cruise into the waters of the Fiordland (Te Moana o Atawhenua). Pyramid-shaped frosted mountain peaks, steep cliffs, tall waterfalls, and deep fjords are the common sight; another bonus comes with the arrival of dolphins swimming alongside the boat.

The highlighted geographical feature in this post is located within the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Te Wahipounamu – South West New Zealand”. I made the image on 25 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/1600-sec, f/4, ISO200, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mgM.

Aotearoa, Ka Tiritiri o te Moana, Lake Matheson, Maori South Island, Southern Alps, Tai Poutini, Te Ara Kairaumati, Te Wahipounamu, Te Wai Pounamu, Te Waipounamu, Te Waka a Maui, Te Waka o Aoraki, UNESCO, West Coast, Westland Tai Poutini National Park, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

22 July 2012.

After spending the morning and a part of the afternoon walking to and from the Fox Glacier, I arranged for an afternoon shuttle-bus ride from the township to (and back from) Lake Matheson (Te Ara Kairaumati). The walk around the lake is not physically demanding, and at the northwest end of the lake is the viewpoint called “View of Views.” A small clearing through the trees provides a view across the lake and beyond to the nation’s two highest mountains: Mount Tasman (Horokoau) and Mount Cook (Aoraki). As it’s my only day in the area, the timing is excellent at the final light of day.

The highlighted geographical feature in this post is located within the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Te Wahipounamu – South West New Zealand”. I made the image on 22 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/160-sec, f/4.5, ISO400, and 34mm focal length (54mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mgJ.

Franz Josef Glacier, Westland National Park, South Island, New Zealand, Aotearoa, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twenty-nine

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

20 July 2012.

On New Zealand’s South Island, two glaciers have unusual attributes by comparison to other glaciers around the world: they’re presently located adjacent to a temperate rainforest, and they’re both accessible on foot and with personal vehicle. One of these glaciers has the Māori name “Kā Roimata o Hine Hukatere” for “the tears of Hine Hukatere”, after a tragic story passed by oral tradition from one generation to the next. The colonizers’ name is the Franz Josef Glacier, named in 1865 by German geologist Julius von Haast after the Austrian emperor of the time.

In the image here, I’m standing next to a massive terminal moraine just out of frame at right. This is the safe and “nearest” viewpoint, about 0.5 km from the head of the receding glacier. The glacier melt is responsible for the Waiho river, whose initial flow is marked by the diagonal line of rocks towards the lower left. Poor “stick people”! You can read more about my daytrip to the Franz Josef Glacier.

The highlighted geographical feature in this post is located within the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Te Wahipounamu – South West New Zealand”. I made the image on 20 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/1600-sec, f/4, ISO100, and 25mm focal length (40mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mez.

Seaward Kaikoura mountain range, on KiwiRail Coastal Pacific train, Picton to Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twenty-eight

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

14 July 2012.

It’s the slow measured surface journey from Wellington to Christchurch. After the morning passage across Cook Strait to Picton, I hop on board Kiwi Rail’s Coastal Pacific for the southbound train along the South Island’s east coast. The train includes covered open-air cars for a very breezy view of the surrounding landscape. Shortly before arrival in Kaikoura, I look back to the northwest for a view of the mountains in the Seaward Kaikoura Range; these mountains are considered the northern tip of the Southern Alps (Kā Tiritiri o te Moana).

I made the image on 14 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/400-sec, f/4.5, ISO400, and 30mm focal length (48mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mei.

Alhambra-Union Rugby Football Club, North Ground, rugby, rugby union, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand, Aotearoa, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Otago rugby, Dunedin North Ground

28 July 2012.

Over the duration of a year-long journey around the world, I’m spending significant time in the southern hemisphere (not unlike five previous years working and living in Chile). The time has also meant I’ve come to learn about cricket and rugby, which are important to Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. I was introduced to rugby league years ago, but I prefer rugby union, especially after having watched on television games during the 2011 Rugby World Cup.

On foot north from Dunedin CBD centre to Baldwin Street, I pass by the city’s North Ground, home to the Alhambra-Union Rugby Football Club. I stop to watch one of the Club’s junior sides, Colts, in an afternoon rugby game in progress where this “line-out” takes place.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 28 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 50-prime, and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/5, ISO100, and 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9ZA.

Air Safaris, Southern Alps, Westland National Park, Aoraki Mount Cook National Park, South Island, New Zealand, fotoeins.com, myRTW

Fotoeins Friday: Aoraki-Horokoau flyby, New Zealand

21 July 2012.

Approximate location: -43.546433, 170.144492 (43°32’47.2″S 170°08’40.2″E)
Approximate altitude: 3000 metres (9850 feet)
View azimuth: 170 to 175 degrees (south-southeast)

We’re up among New Zealand’s Southern Alps as the flight takes us over Westland Tai Poutini National Park and Aoraki Mount Cook National Park. I’ve supplied featured labels to help with orientation in this southeast view. Despite scale, height, and distance, I get the distinct feeling that I can just about leap out of the plane to a soft snow landing or if I could reach out with my hand, I could touch the nation’s two tallest mountains, Aoraki (Mount Cook) and Horokoau (Mount Tasman), sacred to the Māori people.

A visual account of the circular flight over southwest New Zealand can be seen here. The west coast on the nation’s South Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1990.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 21 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/3200-sec, f/5, ISO200, and 33mm focal length (53mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9Zb.

Interislander, Sinclair Head, Te Rimurapa, Cook Strait, Raukawa, North Island Te Ika a Maui, New Zealand, Aotearoa, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Crossing New Zealand’s Cook Strait (Raukawa)

14 July 2012.

It’s a cold wet winter morning in mid-July, and I’m on New Zealand’s Interislander ferry from Wellington on the North Island to Picton on the South Island. With the seasonal weather, visibility and skies are limited with low-lying stratus cloud creating some showers, mist, and fog. Fortunately, light winds create only small chop on the water, sun rays occasionally break through the grey canopy, and some geographical features begin to appear.

We bid goodbye to the North Island with this sighting of Sinclair Head, known formerly as the Māori settlement Te Rimurapa (giant bull kelp). The trailhead is faintly visible at right leading to Te Kopahou (“bent or folded feather”), whose 485-metre (1591 feet) summit is buried in cloud in this picture. The end of the ridge running as a cliff down Rimurapa is known as Taumata Patiti Pa. The strip of land jutting out to the left and into the water is Tongue Point.

Cook Strait is named after England’s famous circumnavigator Captain James Cook, but the strait’s name in Maori is “Te Moana Raukawa” (also this). This latter name may be a shortened version of “rau-kawakawa” for the leaves (rau) of the kawakawa plant used to make makeshift visors to prevent voyagers crossing the strait from unintentionally seeing islands and rocks considered too sacred to view.


More

•   “The Land of Tara …,” by Elsdon Best (1919), courtesy of Wellington City Libraries
•   NZ History
•   Rimupara – Maori sites, Te Whanganui a Tara
•   Te Ara – Encyclopedia of New Zealand
•   “History of Māori of Nelson and Marlborough“, p. 41, Hilary Mitchell and Maui John Mitchell, Huia Publishers (2004)

The Māori names for the two largest islands of New Zealand (Aotearoa) are:
•   Te Ika a Māui (Maui’s fish) for the North Island, and
•   Te Wai Pounamu (waters of greenstone) for the South Island. An alternative name is Te Waka a Aoraki (Aoraki’s canoe).

During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 14 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/40-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 33mm focal length (53mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9VC.

New Zealand: inside Fiordland’s Milford Sound

A trip to New Zealand’s South Island is incomplete without a visit to the Fiordland National Park. A stop at one or both of Milford Sound or Doubtful Sound is also highly recommended, as they are some of the most popular destinations in New Zealand and on the South Island. From Queenstown, I sided with Real Journeys for a daytrip out to Milford Sound: morning coach on the only road access, Milford Sound Highway (State Highway 94), from Queenstown to Milford Sound; a boat into the fiord; and the return to Queenstown by plane. The Maori Ngai Tahu name for the body of water is Piopiotahi (“one piopio bird”). The piopio resembles a thrush but is considered extinct with the last sighting in 1905.

Much of the scenery reminds me of my home province: coastal British Columbia. Carved by glacial activity, Fjords (also spelled “fiords”) are long narrow inlets with steep sides or cliffs. My time in southwest New Zealand reminds me of home along the southwest coast of British Columbia.

( Click here for images and more )

Baldwin Street, Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand

Dunedin: Baldwin Street, (2nd) steepest in the world

July 2019: The record for the world’s steepest road now belongs to Harlech, Wales (CBC News).


In Dunedin, New Zealand, make your way from the city centre, around the University of Otago to North Road, and onwards to Baldwin Street, where The Guinness Book of Records declared the latter street as “the steepest (street) in the world” in 1997. With this claim to fame, the street is touted as a place to visit in Dunedin. Anybody who’s spent time in San Francisco should take the challenge and find out whether the ascent grade on Baldwin Street approaches or exceeds their experience in the American city by the Bay.

( Click here for more )

Lake Matheson, Westland National Park, West Coast, South Island, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

New Zealand: Lake Matheson & the southern Alps at sunset

Rewards go to the patient, especially those on daytime walks through the temperate rainforest to the Franz Josef Glacier and the Fox Glacier.

After all, this area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

After my visit to Fox Glacier earlier in the day, I arranged for a short 10-minute shuttle from Fox Glacier town to Lake Matheson (Te Ara Kairaumati) before sunset. Even in winter’s low-season, I was surprised by how few people were around to enjoy the view.

The sequence of photos below span a period of just over one hour in time. Appearing in most of the photos are the two grand snow-frosted peaks: Mount Tasman (Horokoau) on the left and Aoraki (Mount Cook) on the right.

( Click here for more )

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