Fotoeins Fotografie

a question of home: 鹹水埠溫哥華? Oder woanders?

Posts tagged ‘sunset’

Pacific Ocean, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Waikoloa Village, Kona side, Big Island, Hawaii, USA, fotoeins.com

Rise and Set: First and Last Light (WPC)

Above/featured: Facing west into the Pacific from Waikoloa Village on the Big Island of Hawaii, USA – 19 May 2008.

For the last ten years, it’s been an interesting exercise to photograph a variety of sunrises and sunsets at a number of locations around the world. One of my favourite locations was Cerro Tololo and Cerro Pachón in north-central Chile, a place I visited and subsequently worked as astronomer between 1995 and 2011.

But my favourite “sun time” is summer sunrise. Early morning in July has a very special feel; the air is different, it’s still, it’s warm. Birds chirp idly, while the few humans out and about chatter quietly. All like me have eschewed sleep to witness daybreak and sunrise before 6am.

This post is a contribution to WPC’s Rise/Set. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bFO with the seven photos appearing here made between 2008 and 2014.


First Light


Final Light

Sunset, Cerro Pachon, Cerro Tololo, Region de Coquimbo, Chile

Sunset over the Salish Sea (English Bay), from St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada - 8 Aug 2014, fotoeins.com

His final sunset over the Salish Sea

Every day felt like a bonus, a sweet taste of daily magic.

Over the time he spent in the hospital, Dad charmed the staff by chatting with them in broken English; it was a way for him to express some measure of control. As expected with decreasing hemoglobin levels, his body continued the downward slide. His mind and spirit departed at the beginning of the third week; he had become unresponsive. Over the next five days, his body remained, the breathing steady, though shallow and sometimes laboured. He was calm, at peace, and thanks to the meds, without pain.

From the top of St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, I photographed this post-sunset scene on 8 August 2014, with fading light peeking up and over the cirrus, high over the Salish Sea (English Bay) and the downtown peninsula. I’m sure he sensed the daily change in light, even though he could no longer see by the end.

Hours later the following morning, Dad breathed his last and slipped away for good. He marked his 82nd birthday six weeks earlier.

The long road for him has ended; another chapter and another journey begins.


Warmest thanks to the staff at St. Paul’s Hospital, and particularly, the men and women who work enthusiastically and gracefully in the hospital’s Palliative Care Unit. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5vy.

Summer solstice sunset silhouette at the Salish Sea : Second Beach, Stanley Park, Vancouver, Canada - 21 Jun 2014, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: summer solstice sunset silhouette

On a beautiful warm sunny day on Canada’s West Coast, the first day of summer feels like the everybody in Vancouver shows up in parks and beaches. There are countless numbers of bicyclists; rollerbladers; people walking the Seawall; families, children giggling away, babies in strollers; people walking their dogs, and people on the beach to get their tan on. I’m glad my friend, Megan, was with me to watch this magnificent sunset.

Two additional summertime shots appear here and here.

What’s your favourite memory of summer? Please leave your comments below!

I made the photo above at Second Beach in Vancouver’s Stanley Park on the evening of 2014’s summer solstice (21 June). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com, and also appears on Travel Photo Thursday for Nancie McKinnon’s Budget Travelers Sandbox.

Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Sydney’s sunset heights: a golden crown at the Harbour Bridge arch

It’s late-April, and the days grow shorter in autumn here in the southern hemisphere. That also means that with each passing day towards the winter solstice, the sun’s path across the sky drifts a little bit northwards. The 23.4-degree tilt of the Earth’s rotation-axis with respect to the Earth’s orbital-plane around the Sun ensures that most of the planet experiences four seasons with every full orbit or revolution around the Sun.

From my desire to photograph sunsets here in Sydney, Australia, I knew that the setting sun would soon intersect the crown in the arch of Sydney’s Harbour Bridge as viewed from Dover Heights in the eastern suburbs. Frequent “reconnaissance” visits to Dover Heights (and getting to know the 380 bus-route very well), I had worked out how much the position of the (setting) sun would change in the sky with every passing day.

There would be an occasional day when a part of me would reject the notion of heading out to try again. The reasonable side of me wouldn’t hear of it. “It’s sunny, it’s +25C, you have to go through Bondi Beach (awww); so, get your butt out there before you regret it.” Aaaah, because regret and me, you know we’re … “this” close.

With a successful experiment to photograph sunsets (and the full moon) in late-April, I have no regrets.

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Dover Heights, Sydney, Australia

Sydney sunset from west and east

It can be a little unusual to view a sunset from both west and east.

From the west looking east, the sun is behind the viewer, and the setting sun illuminates everything in front of the viewer; that’s a way to describe “front illumination.” From the east looking west, the sun is in front of the viewer, and anything in between the sun and the viewer will appear (mostly) in silhouette; this is an example of “back illumination”.

That’s all very wordy to be sure, but I have above photos of two sunsets in Sydney, one sunset seen from the west and another sunset seen from the east.

In the first case, I boarded the Parramatta River ferry and headed east towards the City as the sun set behind us on the boat. In the second case, I wandered over to Dover Heights in the eastern suburbs to watch the sunset directly in front of me.

In both cases, the Sydney Harbour Bridge is the centrepiece for the setting sun.

Addendum: this photographic experiment became a complete success two weeks after the first photo I made on 14 April …

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