Fotoeins Fotografie

photography as worlds between words

Posts tagged ‘soccer’

1. FC Köln: Rhein Energie Stadion & Team Anthems

“Gute Laune, Laute Stimme”: the experience has me hooked.

I’m among men and women, young and old, swimming in a sea of red and white, and surrounded by full-volume chanting. Not only is it a big deal to procure a “Stehplatz” (standing spot) for under € 20, but to be present in the stadium’s standing-only terraces is a big thrill. The terraces are present in German football stadia but banned in England (for historical reasons). I’m convinced I’m going to memorize their famous fan anthem as quickly as possible.

Founded on 13 February 1948, the football (soccer) team 1. FC Köln plays out of the Rhein-Energie-Stadion (Rhine Energy Stadium) in Cologne. The stadium’s maximum capacity is about fifty-thousand, and the football side regularly sells out their home matches. The team’s mascot is a billy goat (Geissbock) for its steadfast stubborn perseverance. I’m also convinced there’s another “Kölle” verbal pun. “Geist-bock” is a compound noun consisting of “Geist” for (team-, fan-) spirit, and “Bock” for the people’s stubborn steadfast support. Various generations of “Hennes”, the mascot goat, have appeared on the sideline for home matches, and the mascot is prominent in the team badge’s and familiar red-and-white home kit (jersey).

RheinEnergie-Stadion Südseite. Im Vordergrund Fußballspieler auf der Jahnwiese im Rahmen des „Come-Together-Cup“ 2011, photo by Raimond Spekking, on Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 4.0

RheinEnergie-Stadion, photo by Raimond Spekking (Wiki)


2006

4. Dezember 2006: 2. Liga, 15. Spieltag (2nd Division, 15th Round).
1. FC Köln lose 1—3 at home to MSV Duisburg.

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Rhein Energie” (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Pre-match warm-up activities (HL)
1. FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Unter Freunden | among friends (HL)


2008

10. Oktober 2008: 1. Liga, 8. Spieltag (1st Division, 8th Round).
1. FC Köln blank visitors FC Energie Cottbus by a score of 1—0.

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Stadium view east through the foliage to the Cologne Cathedral (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Zeig’ Rassismus die Rote Karte!” | “Show Racism the Red Card!” campaign (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

First-half action (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Home-side leads 1-nil, early in the second-half (HL)

1 FC Koeln, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

1. FC Köln players acknowledge home crowd after 1-nil victory (HL)

“Mer stonn zo Dir, FC Kölle”

The anthem is written and performed in the Kölsch dialect by local band Höhner. The German translation (Deutsche Übersetzung) is provided here and here. American Geissbock provides an English translation. The following is the song text in Kölsch.

Iehrefeld, Raderthal, Nippes, Poll, Esch, Pesch un Kalk
üvverall jitt et Fans vom FC Kölle
en Rio, en Rom, Jläbbisch, Prüm un Habbelrath
üvverall jitt et Fans vom FC Kölle

Freud oder Leid, Zokunft un Verjangenheit
e Jeföhl da verbingk – FC Kölle
Ov vör ov zoröck – neues Spiel heiß` neues Jlöck
e Jeföhl dat verbingk – FC Kölle

Mer Schwöre Dir he op Treu un op Iehr:
Mer stonn zo Dir FC Kölle
un mer jon met Dir wenn et sin muß durch et Füer
halde immer nur zo Dir FC Kölle!

Jung oder alt – ärm oder rich
zesamme simmer stark FC Kölle
Durch dick und durch dünn – janz ejal wohin
nur zesamme simmer stark FC Kölle!

Mer Schwöre Dir he op Treu un op Iehr:
Mer stonn zo Dir FC Kölle
un mer jon met Dir wenn et sin muß durch et Füer
halde immer nur zo Dir FC Kölle!

Mer Schwöre Dir he op Treu un op Iehr:
Mer stonn zo Dir FC Kölle
un mer jon met Dir wenn et sin muß durch et Füer
halde immer nur zo Dir FC Kölle!


Every year on the Sunday before the first match of the new Bundesliga season, people gather for mass inside the Cologne Cathedral and sing an anthem for 1. FC Köln. Thanks to domradio.de, these “mass videos” begin the 2015-2016, 2016-2017, and 2017-2018 seasons.


The RheinEnergie Stadion is easily reached from Cologne city centre with KVB public transport light rail (Stadtbahn) line 1 to station “Rheinenergie-Stadion”.

Disclosure: No Connection, Unpaid, My Own Opinions. I have not received any compensation for writing this content and I have no material connection to the 1. FC Köln organization, Rhein-Energie-Stadion, or the city of Cologne. With the exception of the stadium photo, I made the other photos on 4 December 2006, 18 October 2008, and 14 January 2013. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5yG.

The Sphere and Circle of Life

The sport called “soccer” (association football) in North America is known as “football” in the United Kingdom, “Fussball” in Germany, “fútbol” in Spanish-speaking countries, and 足球, literally “foot ball”, in China.

It may sound glib to some, but to many in Brazil, for example, “football is life, and life is football.” The game can be cruel when one side dominates the balance of play only to lose a match. But so too can life, when a turn of events can suddenly make a good-run into bad.

I played soccer when I was a lad; unfortunately, I played the game poorly. I remained a fan, remembering how the Vancouver Whitecaps won their championship in 1979 as their popularity peaked and stretched into the early 1980s.

I’ve always thought about how this relatively simple game is important to people around the world. Football in Africa and Latin America is a way of life, and football also offers a way to a better life. Moving to Germany in 2002 meant learning a lot about how significant the sport was to people within Germany and Europe, and about how integrated “Fussball” was in people’s lives. By comparison to season-dependent sports, the relatively low-cost to play and the versatility of playing in- and outdoors the entire year is attractive to many North Americans looking to pick up a game or sport.

The football pitch below is located at a former race-track in a neighbourhood park, not far from where I was raised in Vancouver’s Strathcona neighbourhood. In late-spring and summer, the pitch is used frequently for local league matches.

I found the same pitch empty at 630pm on a late-spring Saturday evening, and I liked how the goalposts lay long shadows on the grass below. In the setting sun, the shadows seem to reach out towards the centre-circle, and I felt the “pull” towards the centre of the field. Was this a buried memory, of what it was like to run up and down the pitch?

The shadows’ stretch struck a chord, and I thought next about the diurnal rising and setting of the sun. The daily cycle occurs without exception around the world. Soccer/football is one of the few games played universally around the world. Language might be an obvious hindrance, but put a ball down, and the boundaries come down in smiles and laughter.

Called by different names, a world game with a round ball seems to defy borders very well, judging by what I’ve seen on travel.

Strathcona Park, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Strathcona Park, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Strathcona Park, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Strathcona Park, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Strathcona Park, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Strathcona Park, Vancouver, BC, Canada

I made the photos above in East Vancouver, Canada on 22 June 2013. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

CenturyLink Field, Seattle Seahawks, Seattle Sounders, Seattle, WA, USA

My Seattle: inside CenturyLink Field

Above: “Welcome to CenturyLink Field.” (HL)

18 February 2012.

As the beginning to my year-long around the world journey, I’d say my visit to Seattle was successful.

There was much food, in between stuffing my cakehole with beautifully cured meats at Salumi, some of the best fish and chips in town at Pacific Inn Pub, watching UEFA Champions League football in Shultzy’s, great dim sum at Jade Garden in the International District, and a steady diet of lattés throughout town.

Over the Presidents’ Day holiday weekend, I managed to stop eating long enough to take a guided tour of the football-and-soccer stadium near Pioneer Square in downtown Seattle.

I’ve watched the Seattle Seahawks since their inception and inclusion into the National Football League in 1976. As the concept of a multi-purpose stadium was all the rage in the late-70s and 80s, the Seahawks and Mariners (joining Major League Baseball in 1977) played in the King County Multipurpose Domed Stadium, better known as the Kingdome.

I have very fond Seahawk memories watching quarterback Jim Zorn throwing long balls to favorite wide receiver Steve Largent. Seeing Largent’s retired number 80 up as a banner in the stadium was a big thrill.

Eventually, the Seahawks and Mariners went their separate ways to build their own stadia. The Kingdome was demolished by implosion in 2000 to make way for a new football stadium. The new stadium opened in 2002, and is now called CenturyLink Field. The primary tenants are the Seattle Seahawks and Seattle Sounders FC (MLS).

The 12th Man is an important part of the Seahawks’ fan-base and culture to the extent that one 12th Man Executive Suite is reserved for fans.


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