Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts tagged ‘road trip USA’

Navajo Code Talkers, World War 2, US Marine Corps, Pacific theater, Navajo Nation, Gallup, New Mexico, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Navajo Code Talkers mural

(October 2018.)

We stopped in Gallup, New Mexico, for a few hours on our 1-day drive from Santa Fe west to Flagstaff. Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup is considered an unofficial capital of the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and gateway into Indian country. Formerly a busy railway depot town big on coal transports, Gallup is now a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway.

The town honours the Navajo Code Talkers who served in the Second World War. The 2001 wall mural along South 2nd Street by Be Sargent commemorates the Navajo Code Talkers who were recruited by the U.S. Marine Corps for service in the Pacific Theater during World War 2. Their own Navajo code was never broken during the war. The mural shows the men as they were young and later as aged, as well as various animals familiar to the area.

I made the picture above on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/500-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ilb.

Santa Fé: fall colours, chile flavours

Above/featured: northbound on I-25 to Santa Fe – 8 Oct 2018 (6D1).

From different parts of the continent, we flew in and out of Santa Fé, which served admirably and comfortably as our base for a couple of day trips to Taos and Abiquiú (Georgia O’Keeffe Country). These would kick off our two-week drive through the American Southwest.

But Santa Fé is also important for these reasons:

•   Established in 1610 as the seat of governance for province of New México within colonial territory Viceroyalty of New Spain.
•   Oldest continuously inhabited state/territorial capital city in the continental United States.
•   Near the northern terminus of 16th-century Spanish colonial Royal Road (Camino Real) from México City.
•   Western terminus of the 19th-century pioneer Santa Fé Trail from Franklin, Missouri.
•   Key destination in the original configuration of 20th-century highway US route-66.
•   A delicious, flavourful, and spicy introduction to New Mexican cuisine.


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1-day drive in the US Southwest: Cliff Dwellers to the South Rim

October 2018.

The following takes place entirely on day 10 (of 15) in our drive through the American Southwest. Day 9 was a long one on the road: from Flagstaff, we drove north on US-89 and US-89A next to Echo Cliffs and Vermilion Cliffs, and ending up at North Rim for our first-ever visit to the Grand Canyon. After overnighting at Cliff Dwellers Lodge, day 10 began with a stop at the Rock Houses nearby, then retracing the previous day’s drive back to Cameron, before turning west to spend the rest of the day at the Desert View section of the Grand Canyon’s South Rim. That began our first-time visit to the South Rim, spanning two days (days 10 and 11).


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1-day drive in the US Southwest: Flagstaff to Vermilion Cliffs

Above/featured: Vermilion Cliffs loom over the new and old Navajo Bridge at left and right, respectively.

The following takes place on the first half of day 9 (of 15) in our drive through the American Southwest. From Flagstaff, we’re heading north on highway US-89, past Cameron, through the northern limit of the Painted Desert, and next to the Echo Cliffs. At Bitter Springs, the highway splits, and we head northwest on US-89A to Marble Canyon, where Navajo Bridge crosses over the Colorado River. The highway continues west into the Arizona Strip, below Vermilion Cliffs, past Cliff Dwellers, and into House Rock Valley.


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1-day drive in the US Southwest: Santa Fe to Flagstaff

Above/featured: Continental Divide. Rising to the north are red Entrada sandstone cliffs (Iyanbito member) from the middle Jurassic period about 170 million years ago. The cliffs are part of a geologic formation extending from northwest New Mexico into northeast Arizona, southeast Utah, and west-central Colorado.

The following takes place entirely within day 8 (of 15) on our drive through the American Southwest. From Santa Fe, New Mexico to our destination Flagstaff, Arizona, the day-long drive began on the short leg I-25 south to Albuquerque. This stretch of I-25 is along a part of the colonial road El Camino Real and parallel to the pre-1937 alignment of the now-famous highway US route 66 (US-66). In Albuquerque, we turned right onto I-40, heading westbound for the New Mexico-Arizona state border and beyond. The total distance was a little over 650 kilometres (400+ miles).

•   Historic Route 66 (US DoT Federal Highway Administration)
•   New Mexico US-66 Association
•   Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona
•   Why Route 66 became America’s most famous road, Vox on YouTube, 16 Aug 2019.


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