Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Prag’

Alfons Mucha, Art Nouveau, Jugendstil, Museum fuer Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Prague: Alfons Mucha & Slavic Art Nouveau

Above: “Amants” (1895), poster for actress Sarah Bernhardt and her Théâtre de la Renaissance in Paris. Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg – 5 Dec 2015 (HL).

One of my favourite artists from the Art Nouveau period is Czech artist Alfons Mucha (“MOOTZ’kha”). He loved strong women, or at the very least, he loved drawing and painting images of strong women, from the unique perspectives of a professional nature (above, Sarah Bernhardt) and a personal nature (below, “The Slav Epic”). I also associate Mucha with Prague, and it’s fitting the Mucha Museum prominently features his 1911 painting of “Princess Hyacinth.”

The meeting at Krizky, The Slav Epic, Alfons Mucha, Narodni Galerie, National Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic, fotoeins.com

Part of “The Meeting at Křížky” (from “The Slav Epic”, 1916). National Gallery Prague – 30 July 2013 (HL).

Princess Hyacinth, Alfons Mucha, Mucha Museum, Praha, Prague, Czech Republic, fotoeins.com

Princezna Hyacinta” (Princess Hyacinth, 1911). Mucha Museum, 31 July 2013 (HL).


I made all of the photos above in July 2013 and December 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-8S5.

Letenské sady, Letná Park, Vltava, Moldau, Prague, Praha, Czech Republic, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Touha”, Praha Letná

“Touha”.

A longing or deep desire.

“Sehnsucht.”

The picture above is a west-facing view of the Vltava (Moldau) river as it winds through the Czech Republic’s capital city of Prague whose historic centre on both sides of the river is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. I am here in Praha, with as much love I can spare for the city.

I made the photo above on 5 December 2008 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/6-sec, f/5.6, ISO200, and 55mm focal length (88mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-92x.

Church of Our Lady before Týn, Týnský chrám, Old Town Square, Staroměstské náměstí, dawn, Praha, Prague, Czech Republic - 28 July 2013, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Praha’s Old Town, Týn silhouettes at dawn

In the quiet time before sunrise, there are only a few people scattered about Old Town Square in Prague. Some are delivering stock to the stores ringing the square. Others are on their last legs after a late night of drinking, while others are, like me, up and about in the relative darkness of dawn to enjoy the cool still morning air in anticipation of another hot summer day. Facing east, the skyline is dominated by the twin spires of the Týn Church (Týnský chrám). This entire site is part of the larger historic city centre that’s been declared UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1992.

I made the photo above on 28 July 2013 with the Canon EOS450D (XSi) camera, EF-S 18-55 IS II zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/125s, f/8, ISO100, 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5wE.

Fall morning, Petrin Hill, Charles Bridge, Prague, Czech Republic, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Autumn morning on Prague’s Petrin hill

Orange light during the “golden hour” provides an exceptionally warm glow over fall foliage. Looking out from Prague’s Charles Bridge to the western flank of the Vltava river, Petřín hill seems to come alive with “fire”, dressed with the leaves’ changing colours. There aren’t many people around at this early morning hour, and aside from a few joggers and other visitors, the view belongs entirely to me. Kampa Museum on Kampa Island appears in the foreground to the lower left. The medieval defensive wall, the Hunger Wall, appears at top-centre in the background, running down diagonally to the lower-left.

I made the image above from the Charles Bridge on 7 October 2009 with the Canon EOS450D (XSi), EF 70-300 zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/200s, f/11, ISO200, 70mm focal length (112mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5Of.

Jan Hus (John Huss), Pomník mistra Jana Husa, Jan Hus Memorial, Chrám Matky Boží před Týnem, Church of Our Lady before Tyn, Staroměstské námesti, Old Town Square, Prague, Praha, Czech Republic, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Jan Hus Day

Above/featured: Jan Hus looks up at the Church of Our Lady before Tyn – 4 Jul 2008 (HL).

Before Martin Luther, there was Jan Hus …

Over centuries, the Catholic Church operated with total authority on religion, science, and politics and far-reaching aspects on daily life. It’s a nice racket to claim you’re the only legitimate path to God and salvation. What Jan Hus (John Huss) and subsequent Martin Luther would set in motion when they openly challenged the superiority of the Church and introduced the idea of an individual’s direct path to their own thoughts and emotions in the world and to God. Being cut out as the “middle man” did not endear these two men to the Church.

Jan Hus helped bring about “The Bohemian Reformation” in the Czech Republic in the 15th-century, predating Luther’s movement in neighbouring Germany by a century. The US Embassy in the Czech Republic describes Jan Hus as:

Jan Hus (1369-1415), a predecessor of Martin Luther, was an early 15th century Czech theologian and scholar. He advocated church reforms, such as using Czech as the liturgical language, aligning the church’s practices with teachings contained in the Bible, limiting the power of the church to spiritual matters, and stopping the sale of indulgences. Consequently, he was excommunicated from the Catholic Church in 1412 for insubordination. He was summoned to the ecclesiastical Council of Constance in 1414, where he was ordered to recant his teachings. Refusing to comply, Hus was burnt at the stake as a heretic on 6 July 1415. Over the centuries Jan Hus has become a powerful symbol of an independent Czech national identity.

News of Hus’ martyrdom sparked outrage, anger, and protests (often violent) among Czechs, and the movement eventually ignited the Hussite wars between Hus’ followers (early Protestants) and the Catholic Church. Armed conflict ended with infighting among the Hussites, and ultimately defeat of the Hussites at the hands of Catholic forces.

In 1903, Czech sculptor Ladislav Saloun began work on designing the Jan Hus Memorial. Jan Hus is seen looking up and towards the Church of Our Lady before Týn which was the primary church for the Hussites between 1419 and 1621. The memorial was inaugurated at Prague’s Old Town Square on 6 July 1915 to mark the 500th anniversary of Jan Hus’ martyrdom. As Prague was under the rule of the Habsburg (i.e., Catholic) Empire in 1915, the authorities of the day refused to acknowledge the memorial and forbade an official event. In quiet protest, city residents proceeded to blanket the new monument with flowers. The Jan Hus memorial has become a symbol of opposition against foreign rule.

6 July 2015 marked the 600th anniversary of Jan Hus’ death. What were some of the following consequences?

•   1st Defenestration in Prague, 1419
•   Jiří z Poděbrad (George of Poděbrady)
•   Precedes Martin Luther’s Reformation by 100 years
•   World’s largest Reformation monument in Worms, Germany
•   Pope John Paul II’s apology, 1999

More on Jan Hus

•   My Expats CZ
•   My Czech Republic
•   Prague.CZ

I made this photo on 4 July 2008 with the Canon EOS450D, EF 18-55 IS zoom- and kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/500s, f/7.1, ISO200, and 27mm focal length (43mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-6WM.

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