Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘My Seattle’

Morning fog, autumn fog, Seattle P-I globe, West Thomas St Overpass, Myrtle Edwards Park, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Seattle: the Sound and the Silence (WPC)

“Fog”, definition: “a thick cloud of tiny water droplets suspended in the atmosphere at or near the earth’s surface that obscures or restricts visibility (to a greater extent than mist; strictly, reducing visibility to below 1 kilometre).”

Fog isn’t atypical for autumn or winter in the city of Seattle or in the Puget Sound region. While less effective than snow, the damping by fog on light and sound can still provide a modest visual and auditory sensation of silence. That is, until headlights and foghorns pierce the temporary cloak and illusion.


Morning fog, autumn fog, Seattle P-I globe, West Thomas St Overpass, Myrtle Edwards Park, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

740am, West Thomas Street Overpass (20171211).

Morning fog, autumn fog, Seattle P-I globe, West Thomas St Overpass, Myrtle Edwards Park, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

751am, West Thomas Street Overpass (20171211).

Morning fog, autumn fog, Seattle P-I globe, West Thomas St Overpass, Myrtle Edwards Park, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

830am northwest, into Sound fog (20171211).

Morning fog, autumn fog, Seattle P-I globe, West Thomas St Overpass, Myrtle Edwards Park, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

840am southeast, as the sun burns through (20171211).


I made the photos above on 6 January 2015 on board the WSDOT Ferry MV Kaleetan from Bremerton to Seattle, and on 11 December 2017 near Myrtle Edwards Park. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aYc.

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

My Seattle: Solar power sun flower sound garden

A set of very tall “flowers” greets visitors to the Seattle Center. The sculpture by Dan Corson is called “Sonic Bloom” for the Pacific Science Center. Five flowers constructed with steel, acrylic, and fibreglass stand up to 13 metres (40 feet) above the ground. The stripes along the stalks are large mysterious barcodes left as puzzles for people to decode. Night-time illumination by the sculpture is powered completely from solar energy stored on panels “capping” the flowers and panels at the neighboring Science Center. The sculpture is a playful mix of both sight and sound as detection sensors subsequently emit choral tones in the presence of movement.

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com
Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

“Sonic Bloom” (Dan Corson) with the Pacific Science Center behind.

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Together with the Space Needle, all lit up!


I made the media above by day on 10 October 2016 and at night on 14 April 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9zW.

CenturyLink Field, Seattle Seahawks, Seattle Sounders, Seattle, WA, USA

My Seattle: inside CenturyLink Field (IG)

Above: “Welcome to CenturyLink Field.” (HL)

Visit, 18 Feb 2012

As the beginning to my year-long around the world journey, I’d say my visit to Seattle was successful.

There was much food, in between stuffing my cakehole with beautifully cured meats at Salumi, some of the best fish and chips in town at Pacific Inn Pub, watching UEFA Champions League football in Shultzy’s, great dim sum at Jade Garden in the International District, and a steady diet of lattés throughout town.

Over the Presidents’ Day holiday weekend, I managed to stop eating long enough to take a guided tour of the football-and-soccer stadium near Pioneer Square in downtown Seattle.

I’ve watched the Seattle Seahawks since their inception and inclusion into the National Football League in 1976. As the concept of a multi-purpose stadium was all the rage in the late-70s and 80s, the Seahawks and Mariners (joining Major League Baseball in 1977) played in the King County Multipurpose Domed Stadium, better known as the Kingdome.

I have very fond Seahawk memories watching quarterback Jim Zorn throwing long balls to favorite wide receiver Steve Largent. Seeing Largent’s retired number 80 up as a banner in the stadium was a big thrill.

Eventually, the Seahawks and Mariners went their separate ways to build their own stadia. The Kingdome was demolished by implosion in 2000 to make way for a new football stadium. The new stadium opened in 2002, and is now called CenturyLink Field. The primary tenants are the Seattle Seahawks and Seattle Sounders FC (MLS).

The 12th Man is an important part of the Seahawks’ fan-base and culture to the extent that one 12th Man Executive Suite is reserved for fans.

( Click here for images and more )

%d bloggers like this: