Fotoeins Fotografie

location bifurcation, place & home

Posts tagged ‘Maori’

Milford Sound, Piopiotahi, Fiordland National Park, Te Moana o Atawhenua, Southland, South Island, Te Wahipounamu, Te Wai Pounamu, Te Waipounamu, Te Waka a Maui, Te Waka o Aoraki, New Zealand, Aotearoa,

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty-one

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

25 July 2012.

Like many before me, I’ve purchased a package for a daytrip on New Zealand’s South Island. After a 5-hour ride from Queenstown on a large comfortable coach/bus, we arrive at Milford Sound (Piopiotahi) and hop onto a 2-hour cruise into the waters of the Fiordland (Te Moana o Atawhenua). Pyramid-shaped frosted mountain peaks, steep cliffs, tall waterfalls, and deep fjords are the common sight; another bonus comes with the arrival of dolphins swimming alongside the boat.

The highlighted geographical feature in this post is located within the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Te Wahipounamu – South West New Zealand”. I made the image on 25 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/1600-sec, f/4, ISO200, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mgM.

Aotearoa, Ka Tiritiri o te Moana, Lake Matheson, Maori South Island, Southern Alps, Tai Poutini, Te Ara Kairaumati, Te Wahipounamu, Te Wai Pounamu, Te Waipounamu, Te Waka a Maui, Te Waka o Aoraki, UNESCO, West Coast, Westland Tai Poutini National Park, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

22 July 2012.

After spending the morning and a part of the afternoon walking to and from the Fox Glacier, I arranged for an afternoon shuttle-bus ride from the township to (and back from) Lake Matheson (Te Ara Kairaumati). The walk around the lake is not physically demanding, and at the northwest end of the lake is the viewpoint called “View of Views.” A small clearing through the trees provides a view across the lake and beyond to the nation’s two highest mountains: Mount Tasman (Horokoau) and Mount Cook (Aoraki). As it’s my only day in the area, the timing is excellent at the final light of day.

The highlighted geographical feature in this post is located within the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Te Wahipounamu – South West New Zealand”. I made the image on 22 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/160-sec, f/4.5, ISO400, and 34mm focal length (54mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mgJ.

Franz Josef Glacier, Westland National Park, South Island, New Zealand, Aotearoa, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twenty-nine

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

20 July 2012.

On New Zealand’s South Island, two glaciers have unusual attributes by comparison to other glaciers around the world: they’re presently located adjacent to a temperate rainforest, and they’re both accessible on foot and with personal vehicle. One of these glaciers has the Māori name “Kā Roimata o Hine Hukatere” for “the tears of Hine Hukatere”, after a tragic story passed by oral tradition from one generation to the next. The colonizers’ name is the Franz Josef Glacier, named in 1865 by German geologist Julius von Haast after the Austrian emperor of the time.

In the image here, I’m standing next to a massive terminal moraine just out of frame at right. This is the safe and “nearest” viewpoint, about 0.5 km from the head of the receding glacier. The glacier melt is responsible for the Waiho river, whose initial flow is marked by the diagonal line of rocks towards the lower left. Poor “stick people”! You can read more about my daytrip to the Franz Josef Glacier.

The highlighted geographical feature in this post is located within the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Te Wahipounamu – South West New Zealand”. I made the image on 20 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/1600-sec, f/4, ISO100, and 25mm focal length (40mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mez.

Seaward Kaikoura mountain range, on KiwiRail Coastal Pacific train, Picton to Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twenty-eight

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

14 July 2012.

It’s the slow measured surface journey from Wellington to Christchurch. After the morning passage across Cook Strait to Picton, I hop on board Kiwi Rail’s Coastal Pacific for the southbound train along the South Island’s east coast. The train includes covered open-air cars for a very breezy view of the surrounding landscape. Shortly before arrival in Kaikoura, I look back to the northwest for a view of the mountains in the Seaward Kaikoura Range; these mountains are considered the northern tip of the Southern Alps (Kā Tiritiri o te Moana).

I made the image on 14 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/400-sec, f/4.5, ISO400, and 30mm focal length (48mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mei.

Pouwhenua, Byrd Memorial, Mount Victoria, Matairangi, Tangi Te Keo, Wellington, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twenty-seven

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

12 July 2012.

For a moment, I’m sweating buckets through tropical summer heat and humidity in southern Vietnam.

The next minute, I’m wearing layers of fleece on a clear winter morning in New Zealand.

That’s what happens after crossing the equator from north to south in early July.

In Wellington, I head up to the Mount Victoria summit (Tangi Te Keo) for sunrise and a panoramic view of the capital city on the North Island. In this view, a bright red “pouwhenua” stands proud and faces south; also visible are the Admiral Byrd Memorial below to the left and the Interislander ferry that’s just departed Wellington for its journey across Cook Strait to Picton on the South Island. “Pouwhenua” are traditional wooden posts carved by the Māori to indicate territorial boundaries or important cultural locations.

I made the image on 12 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/200-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 20mm focal length (32mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-m8u.

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