Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between 🇨🇦 and 🇩🇪

Posts from the ‘New Zealand’ category

Fotoeins Friday: armed, fuzzy, and dangerous (Berlin)

31 October 2012.

While it’s Reformation Day for the east German Protestant states, it’s no different for me than any other day in the German capital city. During this final phase of my year-long RTW, today begins my 3rd week into my 2-month stay in Berlin. After a walk through Treptow Park and the Soviet War Memorial, I swing back around to the S-Bahn station Treptower Park. On the south ramp to the Elsenbrücke bridge, there’s a variety of street art including this panda bear holding two handguns and surrounded by rifles. I have only one conclusion:

“Don’t f**k with a bad panda …”

Julien Fanton D’Andon designed this piece of art as the logo for Bad Panda Records.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on Reformation Day (31 October) 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/30-sec, f/5, ISO800, 37mm focal length (59mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-ah0.

Auckland War Memorial Museum, Auckland Domain, Auckland CBD, Sky Tower, Auckland, New Zealand, fotoeins.com, myRTW

Fotoeins Friday: Metro Domain, Auckland War Memorial

31 July 2012.

At Auckland’s Tamaki Paenga Hira, I spend an afternoon inside the War Memorial building, which houses the War Memorial History museum with the world’s largest Maori and Pacific Island Collection. I step outside to this northwest facing view toward’s the city downtown area (CBD) and the needle that is the Sky Tower which dominates the city’s skyline.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 31 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 50-prime, and the following settings: 1/320-sec, f/5, ISO200, and 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-aow.

Alhambra-Union Rugby Football Club, North Ground, rugby, rugby union, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand, Aotearoa, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Otago rugby, Dunedin North Ground

28 July 2012.

Over the duration of a year-long journey around the world, I’m spending significant time in the southern hemisphere (not unlike five previous years working and living in Chile). The time has also meant I’ve come to learn about cricket and rugby, which are important to Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. I was introduced to rugby league years ago, but I prefer rugby union, especially after having watched on television games during the 2011 Rugby World Cup.

On foot north from Dunedin CBD centre to Baldwin Street, I pass by the city’s North Ground, home to the Alhambra-Union Rugby Football Club. I stop to watch one of the Club’s junior sides, Colts, in an afternoon rugby game in progress where this “line-out” takes place.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 28 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 50-prime, and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/5, ISO100, and 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9ZA.

Air Safaris, Southern Alps, Westland National Park, Aoraki Mount Cook National Park, South Island, New Zealand, fotoeins.com, myRTW

Fotoeins Friday: Aoraki-Horokoau flyby, New Zealand

21 July 2012.

Approximate location: -43.546433, 170.144492 (43°32’47.2″S 170°08’40.2″E)
Approximate altitude: 3000 metres (9850 feet)
View azimuth: 170 to 175 degrees (south-southeast)

We’re up among New Zealand’s Southern Alps as the flight takes us over Westland Tai Poutini National Park and Aoraki Mount Cook National Park. I’ve supplied featured labels to help with orientation in this southeast view. Despite scale, height, and distance, I get the distinct feeling that I can just about leap out of the plane to a soft snow landing or if I could reach out with my hand, I could touch the nation’s two tallest mountains, Aoraki (Mount Cook) and Horokoau (Mount Tasman), sacred to the Māori people.

A visual account of the circular flight over southwest New Zealand can be seen here. The west coast on the nation’s South Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1990.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 21 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/3200-sec, f/5, ISO200, and 33mm focal length (53mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9Zb.

Interislander, Sinclair Head, Te Rimurapa, Cook Strait, Raukawa, North Island Te Ika a Maui, New Zealand, Aotearoa, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Crossing New Zealand’s Cook Strait (Raukawa)

14 July 2012.

It’s a cold wet winter morning in mid-July, and I’m on New Zealand’s Interislander ferry from Wellington on the North Island to Picton on the South Island. With the seasonal weather, visibility and skies are limited with low-lying stratus cloud creating some showers, mist, and fog. Fortunately, light winds create only small chop on the water, sun rays occasionally break through the grey canopy, and some geographical features begin to appear.

We bid goodbye to the North Island with this sighting of Sinclair Head, known formerly as the Māori settlement Te Rimurapa (giant bull kelp). The trailhead is faintly visible at right leading to Te Kopahou (“bent or folded feather”), whose 485-metre (1591 feet) summit is buried in cloud in this picture. The end of the ridge running as a cliff down Rimurapa is known as Taumata Patiti Pa. The strip of land jutting out to the left and into the water is Tongue Point.

Cook Strait is named after England’s famous circumnavigator Captain James Cook, but the strait’s name in Maori is “Te Moana Raukawa“. This latter name may be a shortened version of “rau-kawakawa” for the leaves (rau) of the kawakawa plant used to make makeshift visors to prevent voyagers crossing the strait from unintentionally seeing islands and rocks considered too sacred to view.


More

•   “The Land of Tara …,” by Elsdon Best (1919), courtesy of Wellington City Libraries
•   NZ History
•   Rimupara – Maori sites, Te Whanganui a Tara
•   Te Ara – Encyclopedia of New Zealand
•   “History of Māori of Nelson and Marlborough“, p. 41, Hilary Mitchell and Maui John Mitchell, Huia Publishers (2004)

The Māori names for the two largest islands of New Zealand (Aotearoa) are:
•   Te Ika a Māui (Maui’s fish) for the North Island, and
•   Te Wai Pounamu (waters of greenstone) for the South Island. An alternative name is Te Waka a Aoraki (Aoraki’s canoe).

During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 14 July 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/40-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 33mm focal length (53mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9VC.

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