Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts tagged ‘Koeln’

1. FC Köln, Bahnhof Ehrenfeld, Cologne, Köln, Germany, fotoeins.com

My Cologne: 1. FC Köln, Stadium, Anthem

Above/featured: “1. FC Köln” on the wall of Ehrenfeld station – 14 Jan 2013.

“Gute Laune, Laute Stimme”: the “EffZeh” (F-C) experience has me hooked.

I’m among men and women, young and old, swimming in a sea of red and white, and surrounded by full-volume chanting. Not only is it a big deal to procure a “Stehplatz” (standing spot) for under €20, but to be present in the stadium’s standing-only terraces is a big thrill. The terraces are present in German football stadia but banned in England (for historical reasons). I’m convinced I’m going to memorize their famous fan anthem as quickly as possible.

Founded on 13 February 1948, the football (soccer) team 1. FC Köln plays out of the Müngersdorfer Stadion, known also as the sponsored Rhein-Energie-Stadion (Rhine Energy Stadium) in Cologne. The stadium’s maximum capacity is about fifty-thousand, and the football side regularly sells out their home matches. The team’s mascot is a billy goat (Geissbock) for its steadfast stubborn perseverance; the team’s nickname is The Billy Goats. I’m also convinced there’s another “Kölle” verbal pun. “Geist-bock” is a compound noun consisting of “Geist” for (team-, fan-) spirit, and “Bock” for the people’s stubborn steadfast support. Various generations of “Hennes”, the mascot goat, have appeared on the sideline for home matches, and the mascot is prominent in the team badge’s and familiar red-and-white home kit (jersey).

The English version of the Bundesliga website highlights the team, reminding us they were the first ever champions of the newly established Bundesliga for the 1963-1964 season.

RheinEnergie-Stadion Südseite. Im Vordergrund Fußballspieler auf der Jahnwiese im Rahmen des „Come-Together-Cup“ 2011, photo by Raimond Spekking, on Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 4.0

RheinEnergie-Stadion (Müngersdorfer Stadion): photo by Raimond Spekking (Wiki CC BY-SA 4.0)


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Kölner Dom, Hohenzollernbrücke, Köln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Cologne’s two grand landmarks

Give them any excuse, the people in Köln (Cologne) love to party at any time. It’s a wonder but no surprise this is where I find some of the happiest people in the country. As the calendar flips to a new year, the time heralds the annual shenanigans of the Kölner Karneval. For residents and visitors, two of the best-known landmarks in the city are the Kölner Dom (Cologne Cathedral) and the Hohenzollernbrücke (Hohenzollern Bridge).

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Markt der Herzen, Weihnachtsmarkt Kölner Dom, Roncalliplatz, Köln, Germany, fotoeins.com

Cologne Christmas Markets: Hearts, Angels, Elves, & Nikolaus

Above/featured: Dom und Baum (Cathedral and tree).

Colder weather in late-November marks the beginning of Christmas season with food, drink, lights, and frivolity. The festive markets in the Carnival City of Cologne are equally reflective of cheerful people and good times one expects to find on the river Rhein. Four of the city’s Christmas markets are located at the Cathedral, Old Market in the Old Town, at the New Market, and at Rudolph Square. What makes these four special are their descriptions: “Markt der Herzen” (market of hearts), “Heimat der Heinzel” (home of the elves), “Markt der Engel” (market of angels), and “Nikolausdorf” (St. Nicholas village) respectively. Under the glow of Christmas lights, I saw glimpses of big smiles, warm hearts and bellies, happy children, ladies dressed as angels, and the ubiquitous presence of a jolly rotund bearded man dressed in red.

These markets are in the city centre and easily accessible with KVB public transport. During my visits1, there is no admission charge to enter these markets. On multiple visits over the years, we’ve covered all three on foot in a single evening, requiring frequent stops for food among an unspecified number of Glühwein (mulled wine).

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Morning light: Kölner Dom, Hohenzollernbrücke, Cologne, Köln, Germany, fotoeins.com

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: Köln

What if I’ve landed in Germany, and I wanted to find less-explored aspects in one of her cities? The word “gems” might be overused, but I’ve turned the word into a handy list of “G-E-M-S”, representing a Green space (Grünanlange), a place to Eat (Essen gehen), a Museum, and something a little out of the ordinary or a Special tip (Sondertipp).

They’re not only recommendations, but I’d like the interested reader to consider places where locals go to relax, eat, and enjoy themselves.

I’ve described G-E-M-S for Frankfurt am Main, München (Munich), Hamburg, and Berlin.

The present post is about the Carnival city of Cologne on the river Rhein.

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Fotoeins’ Favourite 5 in Germany

I’ll be the first to admit it.

I’m apoplectic with rage if a person answers “Oktoberfest” as their first and only thought when asked what they think about Germany.

There’s nothing wrong with the raging keggers and oom-pa-pa at Oktoberfest or the beautiful city of Munich. But there’s a lot more to Germany than Oktoberfest. For example, there’s a festival lasting months: the Karneval on the Rhein …

I’m very fond of the country and her people; so I can be defensive when it comes to my “adopted” Deutschland. Yes, the people can be a little ornery, but break past their gruff orderly fastidious exteriors, and they are a lovely warm and generous people.

Sounds a lot like you and me, doesn’t it?

To encourage favourable views about different parts of the country, here are my 5 faves while I’m in the big D:

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