Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Emerald City’

Few and Far, Mud Bay Uptown, Queen Anne, Lower Queen Anne, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

My Seattle: Near and Wide, Few and Far

To mark the third anniversary of the artist collective Few and Far, a group of artists came together in June 2014 to collaborate on a mural in Seattle’s Lower Queen Anne (Uptown). The art shown below covers the south-facing wall of a former theater which now houses the Mud Bay pet supply store and faces a parking lot between the pet supply store and Dick’s Drive-In. Some will no doubt be munching on burgers and fries while they’re looking at furry creatures painted on the wall.

( Click here for images and more )

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

My Seattle: Solar power sun flower sound garden

A set of very tall “flowers” greets visitors to the Seattle Center. The sculpture by Dan Corson is called “Sonic Bloom” for the Pacific Science Center. Five flowers constructed with steel, acrylic, and fibreglass stand up to 13 metres (40 feet) above the ground. The stripes along the stalks are large mysterious barcodes left as puzzles for people to decode. Night-time illumination by the sculpture is powered completely from solar energy stored on panels “capping” the flowers and panels at the neighboring Science Center. The sculpture is a playful mix of both sight and sound as detection sensors subsequently emit choral tones in the presence of movement.

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com
Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

“Sonic Bloom” (Dan Corson) with the Pacific Science Center behind.

Sonic Bloom, Dan Corson, Pacific Science Center, Seattle Center, Space Needle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Together with the Space Needle, all lit up!


I made the media above by day on 10 October 2016 and at night on 14 April 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9zW.

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 2 cultures, 1 ocean (Seattle SAM)

Something bright red and green catches my eye.

Imbedded in bright red, I see an elongated “eye” whose shape is familiar and prevalent within First Nations’ art from the Pacific Northwest (northeast Pacific). I’m also acquainted with that shade of green, not only from Chinese jade but also with the “pounamu” or “greenstone” from New Zealand.

In the Seattle Art Museum, the “Pacific Currents” display represents a variety of cultures across the big (western) ocean. I can’t say I’m surprised why I’m greatly attracted to this piece of art, a piece which represents my place of birth and a place of renewal.

The caption accompanying this beautiful green-red sculpture reads:

Canoe/Waka, 2007.

Blown and sand-carved glass, pounamu (New Zealand jade), red sealing wax.

Preston Singletary (Tlingit, born 1963) and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner (Māori, born 1972).

Collection of Preston Singletary.

“Revivals of traditional watercraft-building among Pacific Northwest indigenous people and Māori of New Zealand have become a catalyst for composing songs and dances, creating masks and regalia, and reviving oral traditions. In Canoe/Waka, the artists pay homage to the canoe as a vessel of knowledge. Gardiner carves pounamu – associated with chiefs and expressions of peace – as the canoe prow while Singeltary sand-carves the glass that forms the canoe’s structure.”

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

“Canoe/Waka”, by Preston Singletary and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner


I made the photos on 9 February 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9KT.

Restless, Hebrú Brantley, street art, downtown Seattle, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “I C U” (Seattle)

It’s about a matter of preparation, vision, and patience. If you’re lucky, maybe all three will converge into something that amounts to something like a special pluck out of the continuous time-stream of things that happen all around us at every single moment of the day.

Created and painted by Hebrú Brantley, this wonderfully dynamic and engaging art piece is called “Restless,” located in downtown Seattle on James Street between 3rd and 4th Avenue.

I made the photo above on 6 January 2017 with the Canon EOS6D, 50mm-prime, and the following settings: 1/400s, f/10, and ISO500. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9uQ.

South Jackson Street, International District, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Waiting on red” (Seattle Inter. Dist.)

Where past meets present.

Where West meets East, and in this case, that meets the western Pacific and Asia meets the eastern Pacific and North America.

Where Japantown merges with Chinatown.

Where trolley buses and the streetcar have their say on South Jackson Street in the International District.

I made this photo above on 11 May 2016 with Canon 6D, 24-105 zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/1000s, f/11, ISO800, 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-92n.

%d bloggers like this: