Fotoeins Fotografie

location bifurcation, place & home

Posts tagged ‘Edinburgh’

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, forty-five

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

8 November 2012.

I’m in Edinburgh, high up in Holyrood Park. From the rocky no-guardrail path hugging the edge of Salisbury Crags, there’s an excellent view of the city, including Castle Hill and the steeple of the former Tolbooth Kirk (The Hub) at left, Calton Hill with Nelson Monument and National Monument at right, and the waters of the Firth of Forth in the background. After a landslide dropped boulders onto the path, the city closed public access to Radical Road and the Crags in 2018.

… Edinburgh has also been known as Dunedin, deriving from the Scottish Gaelic “Dùn Èideann.” New Zealand’s Dunedin was originally called “New Edinburgh”, the city’s nickname today is still “Edinburgh of the South”. The Scottish city’s Old and New Towns have been inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1995.

I made the image on 8 Nov 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/250-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mCy.

National Monument, Nelson Monument, City Observatory, Hume Walk, Calton Hill, Edinburgh, Scotland, UNESCO World Heritage, fotoeins.com, myRTW

Fotoeins Friday: Calton Hill in silhouette, Edinburgh

8 November 2012.

In the magical city of Edinburgh, I’ve been told I’ve been fortunate to see the sun. And so it is, with the late-autumn afternoon sun that I find myself on the north side of Calton Hill with a beautiful expansive view of the Firth of Forth river estuary to the north. But I turn around and I want this, the same silhouette someone would’ve seen in centuries past. From left to right respectively are the grand but uncompleted National Monument, the telescope-shaped Nelson Monument, and the City Observatory. Calton Hill is part of Edinburgh’s inscription as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1995.

During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 8 November 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/1600-sec, f/8, ISO200, 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-ahs.

Alhambra, Sierra Nevada, Granada, Andalucia, Spain, fotoeins.com

UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Around the World

Since 1995, I’ve been fortunate to experience significant travel: first as green graduate student on my first (of many) trips to Chile; followed by the opportunity to live and work in 3 countries on 3 continents inside a span of 10 years. I didn’t give much thought about their relative importance at the time, but I’m lucky to have visited a number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites (WHS).

UNESCO World Heritage logo, Wikimedia CC3 license

( Click here for images and more )

Royal Scottish Academy, The Mound, East Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh, Scotland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Scotland’s Referendum – Leave or Stay?

Next Thursday (September 18) is a big day in the United Kingdom.

The people of Scotland will vote on a referendum with a simple question – “Should Scotland be an independent country?” Do they wish to secede from the United Kingdom: yes or no? A simple majority of cast votes will be sufficient. As this post goes live, the polls suggest a tight race, right up to voting day. Additional extensive coverage of the origins to the independence movement and what independence might mean to Scotland, the rest of the UK, and Europe are found on the BBC News and The Guardian.

Results: NO 55% vs. YES 45%, as Scotland decides to remain within the Union.

I made this shot in the quiet of The Mound in Edinburgh’s city centre on 8 November 2012 during my year-long RTW; more about my memorable Edinburgh visit here. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5Cx.

The kingdoms of Scotland and England (including Wales) merged to form the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707. The kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland joined to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801. The Irish Free State separated in 1922, leaving behind The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

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