Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Berliner Geschichte’

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 2 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

  1. 1 November 2019: Bornholmer Strasse
  2. 8 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  3. 15 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  4. 22 November 2019: Nordbahnhof
  5. 29 November 2019: Potsdamer Platz

At Bernauer Strasse, the former death strip at the Berlin Wall Memorial has been converted to a green space for remembrance and contemplation. In the days of separation, unauthorized entry into this space was met with gunfire without warning by border guards who had “shoot to kill” orders. A row of red bars highlights the former course of the Wall, and I’m standing what would’ve been “no man’s land” or the “death strip”. The cylindrical structure at right-centre is the Versöhnungskapelle or Reconciliation Chapel to mark the former location of the former Church of Reconciliation which was demolished in 1985 because the structure was in the “death strip” area for the Berlin Wall.

I made the image above on 19 October 2012 with a Canon 450D and the following settings: 1/400-sec, f/8, ISO200, 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-f9J.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is above the red line, and East Berlin is below the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Bernauer Strasse, Versöhnungskapelle, Berlin.de

 

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 1 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

  1. 1 November 2019: Bornholmer Strasse
  2. 8 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  3. 15 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  4. 22 November 2019: Nordbahnhof
  5. 29 November 2019: Potsdamer Platz

One of the first places where people broke through the Wall was at Berlin’s Bornholmer Strasse crossing. On the former East Berlin side is the Platz des 9. November 1989 (9th of November 1989 Plaza or Square) with former sections of the wall and information panels and displays describing the timeline and events of the historic evening.

I made the image above on 8 May 2015 with a Canon 6D mark1 and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, 32mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-f9A.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is to the left of the red line, and East Berlin is to the right of the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Bornholmer Strasse, Berlin.de

Berliner Mauer, Bornholmer Strasse: berlin.de.

My Berlin: Bornholmer Strasse, first through the Wall

By today’s appearance, it’s easy to overlook the bridge at Bornholmer Strasse (also known as Bösebrücke) as an historic landmark. On the night of 9 November 1989, the Berlin Wall opened here first, at the Bornholmer Strasse bridge border-crossing between East Berlin and West Berlin.

( Click here for images and more )

GeistDerBahnhöfe, Südlicher Zugang, Invalidenstrasse, Nordbahnhof, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Berlin Nordbahnhof, ghost no more

“Geist der Bahnhöfe”

From this photograph of Berlin’s Nordbahnhof, it’s hard to imagine the train station once used for long-distance trains to northern Germany had been closed, known as a “Geisterbahnhof” or “ghost station”. Not only did the Wall divide country and city, but also divided the existing urban train network in Berlin. This transit map from 1989 shows how the green, blue, and purple lines in West Berlin go through East Berlin. To prevent East Germans from escaping to the West, BVG trains in West Berlin would not stop at stations located in East Berlin; all passengers would see were dimly-lit dusty derelict stations guarded by East German border patrols. After the fall of the Wall in 1989, reconstruction led to the reopening of Nordbahnhof on 1 September 1990, a month before German reunification. Today, S-Bahn S1, S2, and S25 trains on the important north-south “central axis” stop here.

Perhaps the title of the photo should be “Geist des Bahnhofes” to account for the grammar, but I prefer my choice. I also would’ve liked the photo a little earlier at 245pm to “slice” the S column, but I might not have had these four well-placed figures in this “late decision moment.” I think the light, colour, and elements converge favourably in composition to reflect the spirit of the station and the resilient people of Berlin.

More, in English and German

2014 marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, and the 90th anniversary of S-Bahn service in Berlin. 2015 is the 25th anniversary of the reunification of Germany.

•   Berlin Wall Memorial | Gedenkstätte Berliner Mauer
•   Inside Nordbahnhof station: Ghost stations exhibition | Geisterbahnhöfe Ausstellung
•   Border station in a divided city, by Rebecca Holland
•   Berlin’s Ghost Stations, by Marcel Krueger
•   Where the wall once stood there is now a park next to Nordbahnhof, by Georg Seebode

I made the image above at the south entrance (Invalidenstrasse) to S-Bahn Nordbahnhof station on 19 October 2012 with the Canon EOS450D (XSi) camera, EF 18-55 IS II lens, and the following settings: 1/800s, f/8, ISO200, 18mm (29mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com, and also appears on Travel Photo Thursday for Budget Travelers Sandbox.

Berlin Wall fragment, Niederkirchnerstrasse, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: downfall, the Berlin Wall

Here along Niederkirchnerstrasse is a 200-metre stretch of the Berlin Wall (Berliner Mauer), marking the former border between Berlin-Mitte (East Berlin) and Kreuzberg (West Berlin). In the foreground is the Topography of Terror museum. The neo-Renaissance building behind the wall is the Abgeordnetenhaus or the State Parliament building for the city-state of Berlin. Rising in the background at Potsdamer Platz are two skyscrapers: Kohlhoff Tower on the left, and the Deutsche Bahn headquarters on the right.

9 November 2014 marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. In the second map below, the thick red border marks the extent for West Berlin, which from 1961 to 1989, was an island in the sea of East Germany.

I made the photo above of the Wall section on Niederkirchnerstrasse on 18 March 2011 with the Canon EOS450D (XSi) camera, 50-prime, and the following settings: 1/80s, f/5, ISO100, 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on fotoeins DOT com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5wc.

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