Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Berlin’

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 2 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

  1. 1 November 2019: Bornholmer Strasse
  2. 8 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  3. 15 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  4. 22 November 2019: Nordbahnhof
  5. 29 November 2019: Potsdamer Platz

At Bernauer Strasse, the former death strip at the Berlin Wall Memorial has been converted to a green space for remembrance and contemplation. In the days of separation, unauthorized entry into this space was met with gunfire without warning by border guards who had “shoot to kill” orders. A row of red bars highlights the former course of the Wall, and I’m standing what would’ve been “no man’s land” or the “death strip”. The cylindrical structure at right-centre is the Versöhnungskapelle or Reconciliation Chapel to mark the former location of the former Church of Reconciliation which was demolished in 1985 because the structure was in the “death strip” area for the Berlin Wall.

I made the image above on 19 October 2012 with a Canon 450D and the following settings: 1/400-sec, f/8, ISO200, 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-f9J.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is above the red line, and East Berlin is below the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Bernauer Strasse, Versöhnungskapelle, Berlin.de

 

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 1 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

  1. 1 November 2019: Bornholmer Strasse
  2. 8 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  3. 15 November 2019: Bernauer Strasse
  4. 22 November 2019: Nordbahnhof
  5. 29 November 2019: Potsdamer Platz

One of the first places where people broke through the Wall was at Berlin’s Bornholmer Strasse crossing. On the former East Berlin side is the Platz des 9. November 1989 (9th of November 1989 Plaza or Square) with former sections of the wall and information panels and displays describing the timeline and events of the historic evening.

I made the image above on 8 May 2015 with a Canon 6D mark1 and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, 32mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-f9A.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is to the left of the red line, and East Berlin is to the right of the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Bornholmer Strasse, Berlin.de

Berliner Mauer, Bornholmer Strasse: berlin.de.

Siegessäule, Grosse Stern, Tiergarten, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

My Berlin: 24 bumper tracks in the capital

Above/featured: Siegessäule & Grosse Stern, at night – 13 Nov 2012 (HL).

I compiled a list of songs accompanying my travel, a soundtrack that’s full of meaning and memories. This is another set, a listing of 24 tracks I associate with the capital city of Germany. Music is always about personal selection, and every track fires a specific memory of time and place within Berlin. For example, watching “Lola rennt” (Run Lola Run) in a movie theatre in Toronto in the fall of 1998 planted the seeds for a move to Germany three years later. My first visit to Berlin soon after marked the beginning of my love affair with the “grand lady.”

( Click here for more )

My Berlin: that tower again

I like shiny pointy objects, and if it’s by deliberate effort or accidental circumstance, the Fernsehturm (TV Tower) finds its way into a LOT of pictures from Berlin. And if people throughout Berlin can see the tower, how do those who live in or commute through different parts of the capital city view the landmark? After documenting multiple visits between 2005 and 2017, here are over 30 lines of sight to the TV Tower from throughout the Berlin area.

  1. Adenauerplatz
  2. Alexanderplatz
  3. Bernauer Strasse
  4. Bösebrücke (Bornholmer Strasse)
  5. Brandenburger Tor
  6. Ebertbrücke
  7. Elsenbrücke
  8. Friedrichsbrücke
  9. Friedrichshain (near Ostbahnhof)
  10. Friedrichstrasse (Georgenstrasse)
  11. (Park at) Gleisdreieck
  12. Hauptbahnhof
  13. Holocaustdenkmal
  14. Jüdisches Museum
  15. Klunkerkranich
  16. Kronprinzenbrücke
  17. Langenscheidtbrücke
  18. Lustgarten
  19. Monbijoubrücke
  20. (Park at) Nordbahnhof
  21. Oranienburger Strasse
  22. Ostkreuz
  23. Reichstagsgebäude
  24. Regierungsviertel
  25. Rosenthaler Platz
  26. Rotes Rathaus
  27. Schlesischer Busch
  28. Schleusenufer
  29. Siegessäule
  30. Südkreuz
  31. Strausberger Platz
  32. Tempelhofer Feld
  33. Theodor-Heuss-Platz
  34. Unter den Linden
  35. Viktoriepark
  36. Warschauer Brücke

( Click here for images and more )

IHolocaustdenkmal, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

International Holocaust Remembrance Day: observations from Germany

Primo Levi, Italian-Jewish author, chemist, and Auschwitz survivor, delivered a set of essays about life and survival in Nazi extermination camps in his 1986 book “The Drowned and the Saved”. Levi wrote:

… For us to speak with the young becomes even more difficult. We see it as a duty and, at the same time, as a risk: the risk of appearing anachronistic, of not being listened to. We must be listened to: above and beyond our personal experiences, we have collectively witnessed a fundamental, unexpected event, fundamental precisely because unexpected, not foreseen by anyone. It took place in the teeth of all forecasts; it happened in Europe; incredibly, it happened that an entire civilized people, just issued from the fervid cultural flowering of Weimar, followed a buffoon whose figure today inspires laughter, and yet Adolf Hitler was obeyed and his praises were sung right up to the catastrophe. It happened, therefore it can happen again: this is the core of what we have to say.

On 27 January 1945, Soviet Red Army troops liberated the Nazi concentration and extermination camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in south-central Poland. Over 1 million men, women, and children were murdered.

The United Nations declared January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day; the designation came during the 42nd plenary session of the United Stations when resolution 60/7 was passed on 1 November 2005.

Accepting and openly stating responsibility are critical first steps, but spending time, money, and effort to ensure the simple motto of “never again” is also an ongoing reality that isn’t solely up to the citizens of Germany. It’s a collective responsibility that we all should have to remain vigilant; that we all have to recognize and bolster actions which encourage and strengthen the universality of human rights, and reject the erosion and withdrawal of those rights.

I also believe responsible tourism includes paying appropriate respect at a memorial, especially the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin. It’s my view this important memorial is not (supposed to be) a playground.

And yet, there’s something to be said about freedom in the early 21st-century which allows people to laugh and frolic in the public space, an undulating sculpture of featureless massive grey cement blocks, a testimonial to the systematic murder of millions of people.

Naturally, you have the freedom to take selfies and play here. But it doesn’t mean I’m gonna laugh with you.

•   Yolocaust art project, DW 2017.

( Click here for more )

%d bloggers like this: