Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Arizona’

AZ 77, US 60, Salt River, Salt River Canyon Bridge, Salt River Canyon Rest Area, Arizona, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on AZ US-60: Salt River Canyon

On US-60/AZ-77 in Arizona, on our day-long drive from Tucson, AZ to Santa Fe, NM.

About halfway between Globe and Show Low is the very scenic Salt River Canyon Rest Area. It’s a great place to stretch the legs, descend to the river canyon below, or walk across the 1934 bridge which is now only for pedestrian use. The replacement New Salt River Canyon Bridge (Apache Bridge) opened in 1996. The river and rest area lie on the territorial lands of the San Carlos Apache and the White Mountain Apache peoples. The Salt River flows west and converges downstream with the Gila river in southwest Phoenix.

I made the picture above on 19 October 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/1000-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-eEz.

AZ-77, Pinal Pass, El Capitan Pass, Tonto National Forest, Arizona, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on AZ-77: Pinal (El Capitan) Pass

On AZ-77 in Arizona, on our day-long drive from Tucson, AZ to Santa Fe, NM.

Located 146 kilometres (91 miles) north from Tucson, AZ is Pinal Pass or El Capitan Pass. The mountain crossing is at elevation 1519 metres (4983 feet) with coordinates 33.263 degrees North latitude and 110.772 degrees West longitude, and is located at the southeast corner of the Tonto National Forest. The view shown faces northeast, and I can’t help but wonder what it might have been like for the indigenous or colonizers to have trekked west from what is now New Mexico through Arizona and onwards to California. The inscription for the historical marker at the roadside stop reads:

This pass was used by Stephen W. Kearny’s Army of the West in a march to California in 1846. Guided by Kit Carson it was described in a journal of the trip as “Carson’s Old Trail”. The pass led around the impassable canyon on the Gila River where Coolidge Dam has been constructed.

I made the picture above on 19 October 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/1000-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-eEl.

Grand Canyon National Park: NPS 100 years in 2019

Above/featured: West-northwest from Mohave Point – 15 October 2018 (HL).

26 February 2019 marks the 100th birthday of the Grand Canyon National Park.

On 26 February 1919, U.S. Congress passed legislation “An Act to Establish the Grand Canyon National Park in the State of Arizona” which was signed by President Woodrow Wilson. With official designation, the national park encompasses over 1-million acres (almost 405-thousand hectares) and several thousand years of history of habitation in the area by indigenous peoples including the Havasupai, Hualapai, Hopi, Navajo, Paiute, and the Zuni who consider the Grand Canyon as their ancestral birthplace. UNESCO inscribed the Grand Canyon National Park as World Heritage Site in 1979.

The geology at the Grand Canyon, however, is much much older than 100 years. By geologic standards, the Grand Canyon itself is relatively “young” with the Colorado River carving into the rock about 5 to 6 million years ago. However, the Vishnu basement rock in the Grand Canyon is over 1.7 billion years old; “only” 38 percent as old as Earth’s oldest rocks at 4.5 billion years old. For a rough comparison, if a person celebrated their 50th birthday today for a total age of 18262.5 days, the equivalence of the basement rock forming occurred about 19 years ago, and erosion by the Colorado River taking shape only 24 days prior to the 50th birthday.

We spent three days in October 2018 exploring parts of the Grand Canyon National Park. After our drive from Flagstaff to Vermilion Cliffs, we pushed forward to the North Rim and the winding scenic drive took us to Point Imperial and Cape Royal in time for the day’s final illumination. With a night spent at the beautifully serene Cliff Dwellers Lodge, we retraced our drive back to Cameron, then turning west to Desert View and parts of the eastern end of the South Rim. With our new ‘base’ established in Flagstaff, we drove the following day to the main entrance of the Grand Canyon National Park (via Valle and Tusayan), and we spent the day in the western and central parts of the South Rim. The 1126 km (700 mi)# we covered over the three days was 22 percent of the entire 5049 km (3138 mi) we accumulated through parts of New Mexico and Arizona.


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Springerville Volcano Field, Springerville, Arizona, US-60, US Route 60, United States, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: US-60 in the Springerville volcano field

I begin 2019 with glimpses from the road over two weeks this past autumn in the American Southwest.

Driving east on US route 60, extinct cinder cones begin to pop up on the landscape in an area known as the Springerville Volcano Field containing over 400 cones and volcanic activity with ages between 3 million years and about 300-thousand years ago. The volcano field is situated between Show Low, AZ and Springerville, AZ; is one of the largest volcanic fields on the Colorado Plateau; and is the youngest volcanic fields in the United States. The cinder cone shown above at right is Cerro Quemado.

I made the picture above on 19 October 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). Thanks to AB for making this memorable trip possible. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-cBQ.

Dreamcatchers, Vermilion Cliffs, Marble Canyon, AZ, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Dreamcatchers on US-89A

I begin 2019 with glimpses from the road over two weeks this past autumn in the American Southwest.

On US route 89A just east of Navajo Bridge are market stands along the side of the highway. Some were occupied with wares for sale; others were empty and abandoned (for the season). An “ageless superposition” against the backdrop of the towering Vermilion Cliffs seemed like a good idea at the time. But time itself seems unimportant because we’re standing on lands of the Navajo Nation.

I made the picture above on 13 October 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/1000-sec, f/13, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). Thanks to AB for making this memorable trip possible. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-cC3.

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