Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between 🇨🇦 and 🇩🇪

Posts from the ‘Street Photography’ category

Fotoeins Friday: armed, fuzzy, and dangerous (Berlin)

31 October 2012.

While it’s Reformation Day for the east German Protestant states, it’s no different for me than any other day in the German capital city. During this final phase of my year-long RTW, today begins my 3rd week into my 2-month stay in Berlin. After a walk through Treptow Park and the Soviet War Memorial, I swing back around to the S-Bahn station Treptower Park. On the south ramp to the Elsenbrücke bridge, there’s a variety of street art including this panda bear holding two handguns and surrounded by rifles. I have only one conclusion:

“Don’t f**k with a bad panda …”

Julien Fanton D’Andon designed this piece of art as the logo for Bad Panda Records.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on Reformation Day (31 October) 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/30-sec, f/5, ISO800, 37mm focal length (59mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-ah0.

Hyde Park, Sydney, Australia - 30 Sept 2012

Fotoeins Friday: Sydney soap sphere in Hyde Park

30 September 2012.

Hyde Park, Sydney.

It’s a beautiful Labour Day holiday-weekend in the Australia’s New South Wales, complete with early-spring sun, blue skies, and comfortable +21C/70F temperatures. Located in Sydney’s city centre, Hyde Park is not only the oldest park in the city, but also the oldest park in Australia. The area was originally used as a staging ground for soldiers, and in 1810, was officially recognized as a “common” (open land for public use). Then-governor Macquarie named the common after Hyde Park in London, England.

Near the park’s Archibald Fountain, a gentleman blowing soap bubbles large and small attracts a crowd, young and old alike. Patience forms a well-formed stable spherical bubble, as these two young ladies seem thrilled to be caught “inside.”

During my year-long RTW, I made the photo on 30 September 2012 with the Canon 450D, 50-prime, and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/5, ISO200, and 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-a9y.

Robert Jenkins 2012 mural, Robert Jenkins, Subiaco Drive-In Bottle Shop, Subiaco Hotel, Subiaco, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Mural at drive-in bottle shop, Perth

18 September 2012.

The city of Subiaco is an inner western suburb of greater Perth in western Australia. As I’m visiting friends in Perth for a few days, I find myself curious about “Subi”, and that’s when bright colours catch my eye. I wander into a parking lot in front of a drive-in bottle shop. And next to the Subiaco Hotel drive-in bottle shop, a small auxiliary building is painted over with a delightful and whimsical mural by Robert Jenkins.. A time-lapse of the mural’s creation is found here. As of posting, it’s not clear whether Jenkins’ mural is still present.


Robert Jenkins 2012 mural, Robert Jenkins, Subiaco Drive-In Bottle Shop, Subiaco Hotel, Subiaco, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Robert Jenkins mural, 2012

Robert Jenkins 2012 mural, Robert Jenkins, Subiaco Drive-In Bottle Shop, Subiaco Hotel, Subiaco, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, myRTW, fotoeins.com

Robert Jenkins mural, 2012


During my year-long RTW, I made the photos on 18 September 2012 with the Canon 450D. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-a16.

street art, Hosier Lane, Melbourne CBD, CBD, Melbourne, Australia, fotoeins.com, myRTW

Fotoeins Friday: the art of protest, Melbourne CBD

30 August 2012.

Street art covers the walls in Hosier Lane within Melbourne’s Central Business District. It is in fact the art of protest.

This painting does not carry social or sacred meaning nor hope for money as some primary source for justifying your pathetic needs.
Even though I appear ugly and misunderstood I’m treasurable to those that allow me to hang around.

At centre is the Australian Aboriginal Flag created by Harold Thomas and flown in July 1971 for the first time. The flag was proclaimed by the Australian Federal Government as an official Flag of Australia in 1995.


During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 30 August 2012 with the Canon 450D, 50-prime, and the following settings: 1/15-sec, f/5, ISO800, and 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-a0M.

The place where I died

With these pictures, I explore the perspective of witnessing a parent’s unstoppable decline to the end. While there are no pictures of my father in this set, I give voice to growing distress at his final journey as my gaze drifted externally to the hospital itself and immediate surroundings. Northern summers, specifically August, now mean something entirely different.

On 19 July 2014, Dad was taken to Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital after he had a minor fall down the stairs at home. No bones were broken, which was remarkable considering his worsening health in the final stages of cancer. He would never return to the house in which he and Mum had bought and lived since 1976. By the 2nd week, he had been moved to the Palliative Care Unit (PCU) on the 10th floor. The wonderful hospital staff took great care of him and other patients in the unit. Dad charmed the PCU staff by chatting with them in broken English; it was his way of exerting some measure of control. By the 3rd week of his hospital stay, his mind and spirit had departed, and he had become completely unresponsive. Over the next five days, his body remained, breathing steady, though often shallow and laboured. He was calm and at peace, and thanks to the meds, with diminished pain. I was with Dad a part of every day for the following 21 days until his death on 9 August; he had celebrated his 82nd birthday a few weeks earlier.


Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(1) Inside the room

Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(2) Out the window

I looked out the windows to summer skies, to tell him the city he’d known for over 40 years was still out there. I was also in a hot rage because the rest of the world continued on unworried and uncaring, leaving Dad and the suffering and the dying behind. Entropy is all fine a concept until it reaches out and fucks with your reason for being.

Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(3) From the bed

St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(4) DIGS, Downtown Intercultural Gardeners’ Society

Bute and Davie, West End, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(5) Light

St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(6) The spot

Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(7) Lounge

There’s a lounge area for family and friends, down the hallway at some distance from patients’ beds. In the lounge are couches, chairs, a piano, books, and a small kitchenette with a fridge, microwave, and a place to make coffee or tea. There’s also a small balcony with additional deck chairs for people to sit outside in the shade; the balcony is where I made pictures (6) above and (12) below. With the lounge at the building’s southwest corner, there’s an outstanding west-facing view to the rest of downtown, the West End, and English Bay.

Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(8) Passage

This corridor in the PCU connects the lounge area with staff offices, examination rooms, and patients’ rooms. By day or night, it’s generally quiet: it’s not an eerie atmosphere, but it’s more like a respectful state of mind.

Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(9) Celebration of Light

Next to the PCU on the 10th floor, there’s a section where the windows next to the elevators face west to English Bay. We watch the annual summer fireworks through the glass. There are subdued voices, interrupted by the sounds of mobile phones as people attempt to take pictures. There’s no shouting, no whooping, no clapping. Patients, family and friends, and various on- and off-shift hospital staff all gaze equally and quietly into the Salish Sea.

Law Courts, Arthur Erickson, Robson Square, downtown Vancouver, BC, Canada

(10) Lattice

St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(11) Helmcken

By this point, Dad had become a shell. His spirit had departed days earlier, and his body was hanging on. His eyes, open and unseeing. His mouth, open and sunken. His skin, smooth yet cool to the touch. He looked like a breathing ghost, but a part of him stuck around. And so, I stroked his cheek with the back of my fingers, and I held onto his arm, knowing fully he could no longer acknowledge me. Did I tell him all the things I wanted to say? No, but I had hoped my presence provided some comfort over this time. What I feared most was not the deterioration or the inevitable, but that he was trapped somewhere and unable to communicate. I whispered into his ear: “it’s okay, Dad. We’re all good. You can go.” I repeated this in both English and Toisan for several days.

Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(12) Last twilight

From the lounge balcony, I made the picture of his final sunset. While he could no longer “see”, I hoped he could sense the shift between day and night. Hours later at 610am on the 9th of August 2014, Dad breathed his last and slipped quietly into the eternal sea. When I got the phone call, I felt some relief for him, that his ordeal was finally over. That respite was quickly replaced by the empty vacuum that comes with losing a parent. Even now, 3 years on, I still relive key moments of those 3 weeks in the hospital.

Palliative Care Unit, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(13) Notice


This post appears on fotoeins DOT com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-akW. I made all of the pictures between 31 July and 8 August 2014. All pictures were at St. Paul’s Hospital except number 5 (corner of Bute St. and Davie St.) and number 10 (Law Courts building).

Some may recognize the similarity of my post title with “The X-Files” episode “The Field Where I Died” which is a personal favourite. Those familiar with the episode will also know this video excerpt with this music score.

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