Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘Europe’ category

Platz des 9. November 1989, Boesebruecke, Bornholmer Strasse, S Bornholmer Strasse, S-Bahn Berlin, Berliner Mauer, Berlin Wall, Berlin, Hauptstadt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 30 years after the fall of the Wall, 1 of 5

November 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin- and inner-German wall.

One of the first places where people broke through the Wall was at Berlin’s Bornholmer Strasse crossing. On the former East Berlin side is the Platz des 9. November 1989 (9th of November 1989 Plaza or Square) with former sections of the wall and information panels and displays describing the timeline and events of the historic evening.

I made the image above on 8 May 2015 with a Canon 6D mark1 and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, 32mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-f9A.


Location

The first map section from berlin.de shows my location and image perspective with a black asterisk and black arrow, respectively, with additional parts labeled: Vorderlandmauer (boundary or outer wall) which was often but not always coincident with the “politische Grenze” (political border) between West and East Berlin, Grenzstreifen (border control zone), and Hinterlandmauer (hinterland or inner wall). West Berlin is to the left of the red line, and East Berlin is to the right of the blue line. The second map section below is clickable via Google Maps.

Berliner Mauer, Bornholmer Strasse, Berlin.de

Berliner Mauer, Bornholmer Strasse: berlin.de.

Small towns in the Austrian countryside (LAPC)

Above/featured: Bovine goodness with Gasthof Hauserwirt in the background, in Einöden at the outskirts of Wörgl – 13 May 2018.

Österreichische Dörfer auf dem Land

Spending a few weeks exploring Austria in spring between peak winter and summer seasons got me to examine a variety of artistic and cultural aspects, including:

•   a search for Erwin Schrödinger’s grave,
•   a century of Vienna Modernism,
•   a day-trip from Vienna to Bratislava with a boat on the Danube, and
•   looking for modern Salzburg beyond Mozart and The Sound of Music,

Because I’m all about trains and buses in Europe, there were many towns encountered: some passed by, and others planned and visited. The following 12 examples of small towns in Austria includes a generous portion of mountains from the Austrian Alps.

  • Alpbach, population 2600
  • Ellmau, population 2700
  • Hainburg an der Donau, population 6200
  • Hallstatt, population 800
  • Kematen in Tirol, population 2800
  • Kreith, population 200
  • Mehrn, population 800
  • Neustift im Stubaital, 4700
  • Oberndorf bei Salzburg, population 5500
  • Sankt Jodok am Brenner, population 500
  • Scharnitz, population 1300
  • Telfes im Stubai, population 1500

I retrieved population estimates using an online search with the town’s name and the word “Einwohnerzahl”; I rounded numbers to the nearest hundred.

( Click here for images and more )

Worms’ Holy Sand: Europe’s oldest surviving Jewish cemetery

I’m looking for a “thousand-year history” in the city of Worms located in southwest Germany. This has nothing to do helminthology or nematology, as the town’s name is derived from “Warmaisa”, the former Jewish name of the city. This is about an important part of Jewish-German history and peaceful coexistence of the Judeo-Christian communities within Europe. The town’s fame and reputation is also partly derived from Martin Luther; I’ve already visited the site where Luther was on trial to answer charges of heresy, as well as the world’s largest Reformation monument.

This part of the Rhein river area is considered the “cradle of European Jewry”, known also as “little Jerusalem on the Rhine.” In medieval times, flourishing Jewish communities in the cathedral cities of Speyer, Worms, and Mainz facilitated the creation of a common Jewish league with the name ShUM (SchUM), spelled out by the first letters of the Hebrew names for the three cities. To emphasize the influence of Jewish heritage in Europe and to continue the ongoing process of preservation and education, the recent application by Germany for the ShUM cities to be inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site is at present in the Tentative list (2019).

On a breezy late-autumn afternoon, light fades quick, casting solemn shadows on this ground. In the town’s old Jewish cemetery, I’m the only person present, and I’ve placed a small stone on top of a number of gravestones. I’m surrounded by apparitions over an millennium’s age and by the remaining physical traces in various shapes, stones, and size.

( Click here for images and more )

Georgengarten, Dessau-Wörlitz Garden Realm, Gartenreich, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Dessau, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Dessau UNESCO WHS: George Gardens, Garden Kingdom

Above/featured: Guided Bauhaus tour stopping momentarily in the Georgengarten.

How times have changed: I wouldn’t have given Dessau a second thought a time ago. But after speaking with representatives from Saxony-Anhalt and after spending a few days in the city, I’ve better understood the historical and cultural significance, and those who feel strongly about culture and history should give Dessau a chance.

Dessau is a German city of about 80-thousand people in the federal state of Saxony-Anhalt, and is known as the second capital of Bauhaus in the early 20th-century movement of modernism for design and architecture which has been given inscription as World Heritage Site.

If you’re in town to check out various Bauhaus sites, there’s a 2nd heritage setting over a vast green space. East of the Bauhaus Masters’ Houses are a set of Roman ruins marking the edge of Georgengarten (George Gardens); further in the park is the Schloss Georgium (Georgium Palace). Since 2000, both Georgengarten and Schloss Georgium are part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s shared with the neighbouring city of Wörlitz.

( Click here for more )

Seestrasse, Konstanz, Constance, Obersee, Bodensee, Lake Constance, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday around Lake Constance: Seestrasse to Allgäu Alps

Around sunset from Konstanz’s Seestrasse along the shores of Lake Constance, this view southeast includes BSB ship MS Karlsruhe on its way back into town. In the background are the Allgäu Alps some 75-90 kilometres (47-56 miles) to the southeast in southern Germany and western Austria.

On the left side of the frame is a curved mountain ridge with what appears to be two end “horns;” the tallest “horn” is Obere Gottesackerwänd (Sonnenberg). At the centre of the frame is Hoher Ifen at a distance of 78 kilometres, whereas Trettachspitze is further on at a distance of 93 kilometres. Six months earlier, I stood on Fellhorn mountain, on whose summit I would have faced in the opposite direction to the northwest and towards Konstanz.

Seestrasse, Konstanz, Constance, Obersee, Bodensee, Lake Constance, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

I made the pictures above on 21 September 2017 with the Canon 6D, 70-300 glass, and the following settings: 1/400-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 300mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-e8x.

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