Fotoeins Fotografie

location bifurcation, place & home

Posts from the ‘First Nations Indigenous’ category

Chalchiuhtlicue, Teotihuacán, Museo Nacional de Antropología, Ciudad de México, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twelve

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

8 March 2012

The Museo Nacional de Antropología (National Museum of Anthropology) in Mexico City contains one of the finest and largest collections of ancient art, archaeological and anthropological artifacts from what is now present-day Mexico. Among the artifacts is this 1200- to 1700-year old stone statue representing the Aztec goddess of lakes and rivers. The associated caption in Spanish and English are:

Escultura monolítica que representa a la diosa Chalchiuhtlicue, consorte o análoga del dios Tláloc. Es la diosa de las aguas horizontales: lagos, lagunas, y ríos que recorren o se asientan en la tierra. Va ataviada con un tocado de banda doble, orejeras discoidales, collar, y pulsera. Viste un quechquémitl, falda, y sandallas. Se le asocia con la agricultura, las semeteras y la fertilidad.

Procede del frente de la Pirámide de la Luna, Zona Arqueológica de Teotihuacán. Época Clásica, 300-800 d.C.


(Translation via DeepL)

Monolithic sculpture representing Aztec goddess Chalchiuhtlicue (“she of the jade skirt”), consort or relative of the Aztec rain god Tlaloc. Chalchiuhtlicue is the goddess of horizontal waters: seas, lakes, lagoons, and rivers which run on or settle in the ground. She wears a headdress with a double band, disk-like earrings, necklace, and bracelet; a quechquémitl (shawl), skirt, and sandals. She is associated with agriculture, seedbeds, and fertility.

The sculpture was located at the front of the Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacán Archaeological Zone; dated to the period from 300 to 800 AD/CE.

The pre-colonial Teotihuacán site was built between 1st and 7th centuries AD/CE; for its vast cultural importance in Mesoamerica, the location was recognized in 1987 as UNESCO World Heritage Site. San Juan Teotihuacán is located about 50 km northeast from Mexico City.

I made the image above at Mexico City’s Museo Nacional de Antropología on 8 Mar 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and the following settings: 1/25-sec, f/3.5, ISO800, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). My thanks to EN and ND for making my visit to Mexico City possible. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lI4.

Maplewood Flats, Burrard Inlet, Burnaby Mountain, North Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, five

Civilization, before colonization

In the District of North Vancouver, Maplewood Flats is a wildlife conservation area including lush green space and a set of mudflats (off-limits to humans). In this image facing east are the following place names, courtesy of the SFU Bill Reid Centre:

•   Stitsma – fishing spot for the Skwxwu7mesh (Squamish) people, an area once abundant in salmon, trout, and crab.

•   Lhuḵw’lhuḵw’áyten – Squamish for “arbutus from which bark is removed in spring”; Barnet Marine Park, formerly Barnet Mill. Now includes all of Burnaby Mountain and Simon Fraser University (SFU).

•   səl̓ilw̓ət – hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ word meaning “waters of Burrard Inlet and Indian Arm”; root word for səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ – “Tsleil-Waututh” place/residence/village in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language, meaning “People of the Inlet.” Land remnant today is Burrard Inlet Reserve No. 3.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 16 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lfy.

Port of Vancouver, CenTerm, former Hastings Mill, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, four

Civilization, before colonization

•   q̓əmq̓ə́mələɬp in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people.
•   Ḵ’emḵ’emel̓áy̓ in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people.

The meaning of the words is roughly “leafy maple trees”.

The headquarters for the Canadian Fishing Company (Canfisco) and the massive cranes of the Port of Vancouver’s CenTerm shipping facility provide this present-day picture at the foot of Gore and Dunlevy Streets. Recent history has this location as the home of Stamps Mill (1865, later Hastings Mill). Lining the image at right are the tracks of the Canadian Pacific Railway, connecting the Colony of British Columbia with national confederation and accelerating settler expansion from east to west.

The Sea-to-Sky highway between Vancouver and Pemberton has highway signs with locations printed in English and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh. Vancouver is listed as “Ḵ’emḵ’emel̓áy̓” on signs along route BC-99, even though the physical area defined by the modern city once had multiple indigenous names for settlements and landmarks before colonization.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 2 Jul 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lfs.

Coast Salish place names, Coast Salish, Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, Vancouver Art Gallery North Plaza, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, three

Civilization, before colonization

On 18 June 2018, the City of Vancouver changed the name of the north plaza at the Vancouver Art Gallery:

•   šxʷƛ̓ənəq in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people.
•   Xwtl’e7énḵ in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people.

Both words mean “a place for (cultural) gathering or ceremony.”

The correct pronunciation for these names can be found on YouTube.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 29 May 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/13, ISO800, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lf4.

Coast Salish place names, Coast Salish, Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Queen Elizabeth Theatre Plaza, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, two

Civilization, before colonization

On 18 June 2018, the City of Vancouver changed the name of the front or north plaza at Queen Elizabeth Theatre:

•   šxʷƛ̓exən in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people, meaning “place where people are invited”.
•   Xwtl’a7shn in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people, meaning “place where people are invited to celebrate”.

The correct pronunciation for these names can be found on YouTube.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 8 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/14, ISO1250, and 18.5mm, 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lf0.

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