Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Zugspitze’

St. Johannes der Täufer, Obergrainau, Grainau, Waxenstein, Wetterstein, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bayern, Bavaria, Oberbayern, Upper Bavaria, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in the Alps: Grainau

An infrequent but sure way to get me up, oot, and aboot in early-morning is if there is good light; if there’s the promise of something sparkly and shiny; and if there’s the promise of a subsequent shot. This image takes place in late-spring at 645am in Grainau, about 15 minutes west from the Bavarian town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen in southern Germany. The St. John the Baptist church and cemetery lie at the foot of the looming Wetterstein mountains. The country’s highest mountain, Zugspitze, pokes out from behind to the right of the church steeple.

I made the photo above on 28 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glP.

Grossglockner, Grossvenediger, Hohe Tauern, Austria, Oesterreich, Alps, Zugspitze, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: top of Austria from the top of Germany

For over ten years, I’d been trying to confirm claims of naked-eye sightings (and subsequent photographic evidence) of Italy from Zugspitze, the highest peak in Germany at 2962 metres. Not only did I verify the claim, but I also sighted additional mountain peaks of the Alps in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein.

The next question was whether I could see the highest peak in Austria. With Google Maps (see below), I determined a line-of-sight distance of 135 kilometres from Zugspitze to Grossglockner. I had been wise to use both wide- and zoom-lenses to cover as much of the horizon from the southeast through the south and over to the northwest.

Photo (1) above is at azimuth 105 degrees (east-southeast) at 70mm focal length. The area framed in a red solid line is shown in the next photo, and the area framed in a white dashed line includes peaks of the Nordkette (North Chain) towering over the city of Innsbruck. Labeled are the Wettersteinhauptkamm ridge along the Austria-Germany border, the Jubilämsgrat ridge descending from the Zugspitze summit, and the Gletscherbahn (glacier cable car) between summit and plateau 300 metres below.

With an optical-mechanical zoom at 300mm focal length, photo (2) below* shows Grossglockner (3798 metres), Austria’s highest peak, and Grossvenediger (3657 metres). Both peaks lie in the Hohe Tauern mountain range in the central eastern Alps.


Grossglockner, Grossvenediger, Hohe Tauern, Austria, Oesterreich, Alps, Zugspitze, Germany, fotoeins.com

Photo (2): Grossglockner is Austria’s highest mountain at a height of 3798 metres (12461 feet) above sea-level.


Click the arrow-window icon at the upper-left corner of the map below for the legend.

* I made both photos on 25 February 2017 with the Canon 6D, 70-300 glass, and settings: 1/1000-sec, f/16, ISO500, and 70mm/300mm focal lengths; beide Fotoaufnahmen sind mit Wasserzeichen versehen worden. I made extensive use of Google Earth, Google Maps, Alpenwelt Karwendel, AMAP Austria (from BEV Bundesamt für Eich- und Vermessungswesen), and Open Topo Map. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bco.

Ehrwald, Tirol, Tyrol, Austria, Oesterreich, Zugspitze, Wetterstein, Wettersteingebirge, Wetterstein mountains, Alps

Fotoeins Friday: Zugspitze from Ehrwald, Austria

The impressive near-vertical wall of the snow-covered Zugspitze mountain faces west into Austria, which is where I’m standing in the town of Ehrwald (Tirol). I’ve come here to see the mountain face bathed in late-winter afternoon light. Meanwhile, in the foreground comes a little truck with a farmer accompanied by his trusty canine companion, and a bale of hay in the back.


I made the picture above on 25 February 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/16, ISO1000, and 28mm focal length. Die Fotoaufnahme ist mit Wasserzeichen versehen worden. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aM7.

Waxenstein, Wetterstein, Hammelsbacher Fussweg, Grainau, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bayern, Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Pillars of society” (Grainau)

In winter, there’s always skiing and snowboarding in the Bavarian Alps, but a look here suggests that a walk in the fresh air (with that scenery) can also work wonders. Just outside Garmisch-Partenkirchen, the footpath Hammersbacher Fußweg stretches west to Hammersbach and Grainau with the Waxenstein mountains towering in the background. The clouds coming in and out on this late-February afternoon bring the threat of snowfall.

I made this photo on 24 February 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/160-sec, f/16, ISO1000, 50mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-2Vu.

Zugspitze: can I see Italy from here?

“If I’m at the highest point in Germany, can I see Italy?”

Over the years, I’ve seen at various times the claim made about seeing Italy from the tallest mountain in Germany.

I’m startled by morning sun, streaming through the window into my hotel room in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. I rise slowly from the bed, barely able to keep my eyes open. I shuffle across the room, and pull the small linen drapes aside. It’s blue everywhere, and there isn’t a cloud in the sky. My eyes are now wide open, heart pumping with excitement, because I know skies are gonna be clear up top. Later I learn forecast conditions for the Zugspitze summit are excellent: mostly sunny, visibility out to 160 kilometres (100 miles) with a high temperature of -8C/+18F. It’s why I have with me 70-300 glass to find out for myself how true the claim really is.

Below I show photographs with sightlines and their corresponding average azimuths*: east-southeast (107 degrees), southeast (138 degrees), south (175 degrees), southwest (210 degrees), west-southwest (250 degrees). I label specific mountain peaks of interest in addition to the flag of the country where the mountain is located. In a few cases, mountains lie along the border between two nations in which case I provide two country flags. For the labeled peaks, I’ve also provided further information about mountain heights and sightline distances in the map below.


( Click here for images and more )

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