Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Zoologischer Garten’

Zoo station, Zoologischer Garten, Hardenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

Smile, Berlin! (WPC)

Visitors and residents come out of Berlin’s Zoo Station (Zoologischer Garten) and into late-autumn afternoon sunshine. Some smile automatically while on the phone with their family or their partners. Some laugh at something funny the other person has said. I think the smiley faces are all about a reflection of that big bright shining globe in the sky.


Zoo station, Zoologischer Garten, Hardenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com Zoo station, Zoologischer Garten, Hardenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com Zoo station, Zoologischer Garten, Hardenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com
Zoo station, Zoologischer Garten, Hardenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

See you soon!

I made the pictures above with a Canon EOS 6D mark 1 at Berlin’s Hardenbergplatz on 9 December 2014. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bIP.

BVG U-Bahn, Bahnhof Zoologischer Garten, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Berlin’s familiar yellow blur (U-Bahn, Zoo Station)

The familiar yellow streams through the underground; the familiar sounds of the train wheels clic-clacking over the tracks coming into place, as a train pulls into the station. These are Berlin’s U-Bahn trains, and I’m standing on the “U2 to Pankow” platform at Zoologischer Garten train station. The station is home to U-Bahn1 lines U2 and U9; S-Bahn lines S5, S7, and S75 (as part of the east-west Stadtbahn line); and to various regional trains throughout the Berlin-Brandenburg area.

1 Sometimes the U2 is called the U12 during construction periods along the east-west lines.

I made this photo above on 30 November 2014 with the Canon 6D, EF 24-105 L IS zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/4s, f/8, ISO500, and 28mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-6Cn.

My Berlin: the humble currywurst (IG)

Curry 61 – Hackescher Markt

Walking around Berlin’s Mitte district on a wet March afternoon, I found myself in the area around Hackescher Markt. I stepped briefly into the quiet Hackesche Höfe courtyard complex to pick up some postcards. I’d already seen (and smelled) numerous cafés, bakeries, and snack shops. I hadn’t had lunch, and with the possibilities of food reaching my eyes, the grumbling belly meant it was time to feed.

The ubiquitous yet humble currywurst came to the rescue. I retraced my steps back towards Hackescher Markt, and I arrived at the street-side counter for Curry 61.

Curry 61, Berlin Mitte

Curry 61 (HL)

A short history of Berlin’s claim to currywurst’s origins goes something like this. In 1949, Herta Heuwer, who ran a snack counter in Berlin, mixed curry powder and Worcestershire sauce with ketchup, and when she served grilled pork sausage with the new sauce to her customers, they loved the new concoction. She patented the sauce as “Chillup” years later. Today, currywurst is ubiquitous, challenging even the Döner as the champion of street-food throughout Berlin.

Bratwurst mit Darm

Grilled sausage, with casing (HL)

Bratwurst ohne Darm

Grilled sausage, without casing (HL)

I had a short conversation in German with the owner:

  • Was hätten Sie gern? — Einmal mit (Darm) und Pommes rot; scharf, bitte.
  • Woher kommen Sie? — Kanada, doch ich arbeite zurzeit in Chile.
  • Was machen Sie hier in Berlin? — Urlaub, ein paar Freunden besucht.
  • Wie sprechen Sie so gut Deutsch? — Schon 2. Jahre hier gewohnt, und viele Mass Bier getrunken.

Roughly translated into English …

  • What would you like? — An order with (casing), and fries ‘red’; spicy, please.
  • From where have you come? — Canada, but I work presently in Chile.
  • What are you doing in Berlin? — Vacation, visiting friends.
  • How did you come to speak German? — 2 years in the country, and many litres of beer.

The owner seemed to like that last answer.

Although the owner asked if I really wanted the spicy (Scharf) version, I got a good dose of spice; my serving had a good sharp edge.

Currywurst mit Pommes

The noms: sliced pork bratwurst with fries doused in ketchup, curry and chili powders (HL)

Curry 36 – Zoologischer Garten

In subsequent visits to Berlin, I’m passing through the train station near the city’s zoo more frequently. Next to the station at Hardenbergerpltaz is a satellite of Curry 36. While their mainstay is near Mehringdamm station, the location next to the station at Zoologischer Garten gets its fair share and flow of people streaming in and out of the station serving U-Bahn, S-Bahn, and regional trains.

I order two grilled sausages sliced into bite-sized pieces, accompanied by “Pommes rot-weiss”, french-fries with dollops of ketchup and mayo (red-white) and topped with curry powder.


Many have written about and swear by these currywurst joints in Berlin: Curry 36 and Konnopke’s Imbiss. I’ve also visited the German Currywurst Museum to learn about the history and evolution of the snack. Come to think of it, every time I’m in Berlin, I’ll seek out the currywurst, from one “Imbiss” stand to the next, in my perpetual search for the ultimate taste of the city.

This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-pr.

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