Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts tagged ‘Worms’

ShUM, SchUM, medieval Jewish cities, Speyer, Shpira, Worms, Warmaisa, Mainz, Magenza, Germany, Ashkenaz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, fotoeins.com

ShUM, Jerusalem on the Rhine: Speyer, Worms, Mainz

When threats of destruction to property and life follow and linger over a group of people through no fault of their own over centuries, there’s something to be said about an eternal need to keep a watchful eye. Words like Verfolgung, Vernichtung, and Vertreibung1 have been etched into memory. I have all this in mind as I explore Jewish history in Germany as part of my need to answer the following question:

How did a nation of people which fostered composers Bach, Beethoven, Handel, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Strauss; and writers Goethe, the Brothers Grimm, Heine, Hesse, Heinrich and Thomas Mann, and Schiller sink to the worst depths of human atrocity and depravity in the first half of the 20th-century?

It’s easy to forget Jewish people have lived in what is now Italy and southern Europe since the middle of the 2nd-century BCE and inhabited southern Germany from the late 10th-century AD/CE2. During the High Middle Ages, three important bishopric (and cathedral) cities of Speyer, Worms, and Mainz along the Rhine river formed an important league or federation of Jewish communities (Kehillot) from the end of the 10-century to about the mid-to-late 14th-century. The word שו”ם or ShUM (SchUM in German)4 is an acronym consisting of the first letters of the Hebrew names for the three cities:

•   Shin (ש), Sh for Shpira (שפירא) → present-day Speyer;
•   Waw or Vav (ו), U for Warmaisa (וורמש) → present-day Worms;
•   Mem (ם), M for Magenza (מגנצא) → present-day Mainz.

The ShUM cities became centres for learning, training, religion, culture, and trade within medieval Germany (Ashkenaz3) and throughout Europe. Today, the three ShUM cities establish key destinations for historical travel, provide rich examples for continuing research on medieval Jewish life, and add up to a comprehensive project in recognizing an important chapter of the history of Jews in Germany.

The ShUM/SchUM was inscribed as World Heritage Site by UNESCO at the 44th meeting of the World Heritage Committee in July 2021. ShUM is Germany’s 1st all-Jewish world heritage site, a big acknowledgement to the centuries-long presence of the Jewish community along the Rhine river.


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Obermarkt, Wormser Weihnachtsmarkt, Worms, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Wormser Weihnachtsmarkt

While I’m exploring a number of German cities in the Mittelrhein region, I’m in Worms during opening week of the Christmas markets. Despite the rainy weather in Worms, people have filtered into the central Christmas market. Near a big Glühwein stand cluster a group of people, their hands holding precious mulled wine.

I get a few blank looks, but I’m used to that. Once I begin speaking German (or some version of passable Denglisch), I know what I’m getting when I purchase a Glühwein and I have to pay an extra “Pfand” (deposit) on the mug. Fully warmed by the hit of hot smooth alcohol, I return the mug to the same stand; to the young woman behind the counter, I say “Zurück, bitte” for my deposit back.

Obermarkt, Wormser Weihnachtsmarkt, Worms, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Lehmann’s Glühwein Stadl”

I made the photos above on 21 November 2015 with the Canon EOS6D and EF 24-105 L zoom-lens. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-7vr.

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