Fotoeins Fotografie

location bifurcation, place & home

Posts tagged ‘Wien’

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna street art, four

Imperishable Relics“, 2015 wall mural by Evoca1, in the city’s 6th district.

I made the image on 29 May 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and these settings: 1/125-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-pvf.

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna street art, three

Was macht uns Menschen schön?“, 2022 wall mural by rip off crew for dm Austria, near the north end of Salztorbrücke in the city’s 2nd district.

I made the image on 31 May 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and these settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-pv7.

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna street art, two

mantra“, 2019 art piece by Mind the Heart, near the south end of Salztorbrücke in the city’s 1st district.

I made the image on 31 May 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and these settings: 1/125-sec, f/8, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-puW.

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna street art, one

The immense gap between past and future“, 2013 wall mural by Faith47, at the Ankerbrotfabrik in the city’s 10th district.

I made the image on 8 Jun 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and these settings: 1/320-sec, f/16, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-oGC.

10. Bezirk, Favoriten, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, Fuji X70

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna still, four

“What’s the hubbub, bub?”

A quiet contemplative moment in the middle of the rush, at the city’s main/central station.

I made the image on 22 May 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ok0.

Neuer Markt, 1. Bezirk, Innere Stadt, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna still, three

Neuer Markt

Afternoon light at Kupferschmiedgasse, in the 1st district.

I made the image on 19 May 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and these settings: 1/500-sec, f/14, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ojR.

9. Bezirk, Alsergrund, Servitenkirche, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna still, two

“Fegefeuer” (purgatory)

A moment of quiet contemplation, in the Servitenkirche.

Is that light supposed to illuminate the darkness and heal the emptiness?
Or is it simply a collimated channel of solar energy which shines a light on all that’s wrong with human beings?
What are the chances that the only other visitor to enter the church sits in exactly that spot?
What are the chances that I’ve any protection outside these walls?

I made the image above on 1 Jun 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and these settings: 1/250-sec, f/9, ISO4000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ojy.

5. Bezirk, Margareten, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, Fuji X70

Fotoeins Friday: Vienna still, one

“Renn” (run).

Next to the Wien river on the Recht Wienzeile, in the 5th district.

I made the image on 15 May 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and these settings: 1/60-sec, f/8, ISO2000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ofL.

My Vienna: Dr. Olga Ehrenhaft-Steindler, trailblazer & women’s advocate

In examining the history of the University of Vienna, I discovered Olga Ehrenhaft-Steindler was the first woman to receive a doctoral degree in physics from the university in 1903. Who was she? How did she become the first? How did society of the time view the education of young women?

I’m starting a series on women who left their mark on Vienna and Austria, and some of the traces they left behind in the Austrian capital city. With educators, inventors, writers, and scientists, my serial includes: Dr. Marietta Blau; Marianne Hainisch; Hedwig Kiesler, a.k.a. Hedy Lamarr; Dr. Lise Meitner; Dr. Gabriele Possanner; Dr. Elise Richter; and Bertha von Suttner.


Who: Dr. Olga Ehrenhaft-Steindler: b/✵ 28 Oct 1879, d/✟ 21 Dec 1933.
PhD: 1st woman with doctoral degree in physics from University of Vienna, 1903.
Educator: Early 20th-century teacher & advocate for better access to education for young women.

In late 19th-century and early 20th-century Austria and Vienna, Olga Steindler was one of countless women who faced difficulties and challenges by young women who wanted to expand their education and improve employment, all of which were viewed by society at the time as undesirable. Feminism or anything similar did not exist.

Born and raised in Vienna, Olga Steindler departed her home for Prague to complete and pass her final high-school examinations in 1899, because young women were not permitted to do so within Austria at the time. She subsequently enrolled at the University of Vienna to study physics and mathematics within the Faculty of Philosophy. Only two years earlier in 1897 had the University of Vienna finally accepted the enrolment of women, although they were initially allowed only into the Faculty of Philosophy. In 1903, Steindler became the first woman to receive a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Vienna after successfully completing her research dissertation.

Completing qualifications for teaching at secondary (high) schools in the same year, she joined the “Athenäum” where she taught young women about experimental physics; she also taught at Vienna’s first girls’ secondary school established by Marianne Hainisch in the city’s 1st district. In 1907, she founded two new schools in Vienna: a girls’ public secondary school in the city’s 2nd district, and a business school for young women in the city’s 8th district. Steindler married her physicist colleague Dr. Felix Ehrenhaft in 1908; she became known as Dr. Olga Ehrenhaft-Steindler. She championed the cause for educating girls and young women, and creating new opportunities in science, business, and society at large. For her dedicated service to the public, Austria awarded her in 1931 the title of “Hofrat” as a new member of the imperial court advisory council, an honour uncommon among Austrian women at the time. At the age of 54, Dr. Olga Ehrenhaft-Steindler died in December 1933 from complications after having contracted pneumonia.


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My Vienna: the Biedermeier St. Marx Cemetery

Above/featured: Spring morning at Vienna’s Biedermeier cemetery.

In Vienna’s 3rd district, the St. Marx cemetery is the only surviving Biedermeier cemetery in the city. A visit now is a jump into the frozen past. The cemetery opened with its first burial in 1784. Closure of the city’s multiple neighbourhood cemeteries began in 1873 with the final burial at St. Marx taking place in 1874. Subsequent funerary functions were transferred to the newly constructed Zentralfriedhof located farther out from the city centre. The very leafy avenues and “leafy gate” are what’s left of the city’s only remaining 18th-century cemetery that’s now open to the public as a city-administered park.

Why Biedermeier

Biedermeier in Vienna corresponds to a cultural period during the first half of the 19th-century marked by increased industrialization in rapidly urbanized areas and strict censorship with the elimination of dissenting political voices. Instead of looking outward to change, the artist and design community moved to safer spaces in nature or to their homes. While innovation might have given way to a modest yet graceful and functional style, Biedermeier architecture in its neoclassical spin provided inspiration for subsequent Art Nouveau (Jugendstil) and Secession movements. An important Viennese architect of the period was Josef Kornhäusel who designed many buildings in the city. Important music from this period was composed by, for example, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schubert, Schumann. One of the largest collections of Viennese Biedermeier art is in the Belvedere’s collection. St. Marx cemetery is a reflection of both city and age from the 19th-century.

St. Marxer Friedhof, St. Marx cemetery, Biedermeier cemetery, 3. Bezirk, Landstrasse, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Cemetery’s main gate – 20 May 2022.

St. Marxer Friedhof, St. Marx cemetery, Biedermeier cemetery, 3. Bezirk, Landstrasse, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com
St. Marxer Friedhof, St. Marx cemetery, Biedermeier cemetery, 3. Bezirk, Landstrasse, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Information stone with visiting hours by month. Photo, 20 May 2022.


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