Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Vancouver’

Spanish Banks, Salish Sea, Strait of Georgia, Georgia Strait, Vancouver, British Columbia, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Spanish Banks’ sunset over the Salish Sea

The Salish Sea, 5 of 5.

The Salish Sea is a body of water encompassing Georgia Strait, Howe Sound, Burrard Inlet, Puget Sound, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The sea is named after the Coast Salish people who are the first inhabitants of the region. The renaming without displacing the old geographic names occurred in 2010.

Any sign of an early summer arrives with temperatures stretching past the 21C/70F mark. Vancouver residents flock to the beaches at Spanish Banks for time with family, friends, and their furry pets. There’s beach volleyball; there are leashed dogs docile and relaxed, and unleashed dogs running wild with tongues wagging out. Hours pass, sunscreen is applied and forgotten, the burn is on the necks and shoulders, the burn is on the meats and veggies on the grill. Before you know it, sun’s down, temperature begins to drop, and it’s time to pack up. Before you leave, spare a thought for the Spanish Navy who sailed into these waters in the latter half of the 18th-century: geographic testament lies in names Juan de Fuca, Galiano, Lángara, Malaspina, etc.

I made the photo on 6 June 2014 with a Canon 6D (mark 1) with 70-300 glass and the following settings: 1/200-sec, f/8, ISO200, and 92mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-b5H.


Great Hall, Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Indigenous Artists: National Indigenous Peoples Day 🇨🇦

Above/featured: Great Hall, Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver – 5 May 2017 (HL, 6D1).

In Canada, National Aboriginal Day is held on or near the same day as northern summer solstice to celebrate language, culture, and tradition on the longest day of the year. In 1996, then Governor-General of Canada, Roméo LeBlanc, proclaimed June 21 as National Aboriginal Day. In 2017, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the change to National Indigenous Peoples Day to include First Nations, Inuit, and Métis indigenous peoples.

To highlight some wonderfully engaging work by contemporary indigenous artists, I provide examples of art seen and exhibited in the Vancouver area.

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Black Strathcona, Strathcona, Black History Month, East Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, fotoeins.com

My Vancouver: Jimi Hendrix’s grandma and Black Strathcona

Above/featured: Hogan’s Alley: Main Streeet at Union Street.

When a wae lad was I, I viewed Vancouver’s Strathcona neighbourhood through the various lenses of my parents, the people on our block, and the surrounding community. That is, I viewed the area as primarily Chinese, in school and on the streets.

As an important teacher, history can often be painful. But an important and unspoken responsibility as city resident and national citizen is recognition and acknowledgement of these past lessons. I learned years later about the destruction of the African-Canadian community with the construction of the Viaduct, which not coincidentally almost eliminated Chinatown. The Viaduct is a remnant of the planned 1960s highway project in the city of Vancouver, but final removal of the viaduct is coming in the next few years.

February as Black History Month has been officially recognized in Canada since 1995. To honour the rich history by African Canadians in the province, British Columbia has also officially recognized Black History Month.

With the present focus on Nora Hendrix, below are specific examples of Nora’s presence in Vancouver to represent partly the history of African Canadians in the city; there’s much more at Black Strathcona.

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B.R.I.S.A., Johan Inger, Ballet BC, Emily Molnar, Ballet BC 32 One, Season 32, Program 1, Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Ballet BC season 32: Program 1 preview (2017)

I’m always interested and fascinated by movement, whether it’s mechanical, natural, or human. Must be why I can’t stop looking at the world through a lens …

I attended a preview of Ballet BC‘s first program for the new 2017-2018 season (season 32). Thanks to Ballet BC and Instameet Vancouver, registered participants were provided access to the venue to watch and photograph the preview performance. Season 32 Program 1 was held for open view to the public on three consecutive evenings: 2, 3, and 4 November.

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The place where I died

With these pictures, I explored the perspective of witnessing a parent’s unstoppable decline to the end. I didn’t include pictures of my father in this set, but I gave voice to growing distress at his final journey in orbit around a downward spiral. My gaze drifted externally to the space and form of the hospital and to the surroundings outside.

On 19 July 2014, Dad was taken to Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital after he had a minor fall down the stairs at home. No bones were broken, which was remarkable considering his worsening health in the final stages of cancer. He would never return to the house in which he and Mum had bought and lived since 1976.

By the 2nd week, he had been moved from to the Palliative Care Unit (PCU) on the 10th floor. The wonderful hospital staff took great care of him and other patients in the unit. Dad charmed the PCU staff by chatting with them in broken English; it was his way of exerting some measure of control. I also witnessed the inevitable “shuffle”. One day, a patient slept quietly in one of the other beds, surrounded by members of his family. The following day, the bed was cleared, cleaned, and prepared for a new patient.

Into week 3, his mind and spirit departed, and he became completely unresponsive to external prompts. Over the following days, his body remained, accompanied by sounds of breathing, often shallow and laboured. He was at peace, and thanks to the meds, in diminished pain. I’d been with Dad a part of every day for 21 consecutive days. Friday came and went, and so did the passing of the sun. As I’d done every evening, I leaned down and whispered: “good night, I’ll see you tomorrow.” The following morning, I awoke to a phone call. The nurse’s voice was calm and gentle. Somewhere in the universe, I heard faint echoes of the death rattle. I said to the nurse: “thank you for your phone call. We’ll be at the hospital in a few hours.”

I ended the call and looked down at my watch: 613am. The date was August 9. He had celebrated his 82nd birthday only a few weeks earlier.

Northern summers, especially July and August, mean something entirely different.

( Click here for images and more )

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