Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between 🇨🇦 and 🇩🇪

Posts tagged ‘Seattle’

Fotoeins Friday: King and Maynard (Seattle CID)

I’ve been fascinated by the origins and appearance of words and characters since I learned how to write in both Chinese and English languages. Thanks to a variety of websites (particularly one about Berlin), my eye has recently been tuned to typography.

In front of the Fortune Garden restaurant in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District (CID) are bilingual street signs which have been widespread throughout the area since 2013. North of Jackson Street, street signs switch from Chinese-English to Japanese-English; east of I-5 and 10th Avenue, street signs switch from Chinese-English to Vietnamese-English.

In the picture, the combination of Chinese characters have little meaning. But where transliteration to Cantonese is concerned, each Chinese character is an individual “vocalization” representing a syllable in English. South King Street becomes “南景街” which is pronounced “naam4 ging2 gaai1” and in literal terms is “south – view/situation – street”. Maynard Avenue South becomes “南美拿大道” which is pronounced “naam4 mei5 naa4 daai6 dou6” and in literal terms is “south – good/pretty – take/use/capture – big – road”. (See the note below* for more.)

I made the picture above on 11 May 2016 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 47mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-byk.

* Arriving primarily from Guangdong province in southern China, people began building Chinatown settlements in North America in the 19th-century; most of the new immigrants spoke Cantonese. With my own intermediate proficiency in Cantonese, I’ve used CantoDict for the transliterations above. The numbers associated with Anglicized pronunciation of Chinese words correspond to six tones in the Cantonese dialect. A summary of the six Cantonese tones is provided in this video.

Fotoeins Friday: Grocers Neon (Seattle Pike Place)

In Seattle, Washington, the Pike Place Market is one of the most visited and photographed locations. If you’re looking, there is an abundant variety of themes, objects, and people to observe, and frankly, you should never run out of things to photograph. One of my favourites is neon signs. With a wide aperture and the background deliberately out of focus, I’ve managed to snag multiple neon in this frame.

I made the picture above on 5 January 2015 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/4, ISO2000, and 73mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-byB.

Fotoeins Friday: Seattle cityscape from Smith Tower

The view at the top of the historic Smith Tower in downtown Seattle is unobstructed, even though the tower is no longer the tallest building in the city. From its inauguration in 1914 until 1931, Smith Tower at a height of 148 metres (484 feet) was the tallest building west of the Mississippi River.

Aside from the protective fence, we’re outside and exposed without glass to get in the way of the view (and avoid internal reflections). As we walk around the observation deck, it’s no surprise to feel the force of the expected onshore breeze from the northwest. At left is Pier 50 and Colman Dock for Washington State WSDOT ferries which traverse Puget Sound. The Seattle Great Wheel is at centre, and following 2nd Avenue from the lower-right to the upper-right, your eye is drawn to the Space Needle in the distance.

I made the picture above on 10 October 2016 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/16, ISO2000, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bA7.

Phnom Penh Noodle House, International District, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Tasty eats in Seattle

The distance between Vancouver BC and Seattle WA is 232 kilometres (144 miles) which is a 2.5- to 3-hour drive or a slightly longer trip with the bus or train. Seattle is older than Vancouver by 27 years as incorporated cities (1869 vs. 1886), but despite the relative proximity, I’ve always been fascinated by the different paths by which both cities have evolved.

Seattle is famous for its coffee and famous for her people’s love of a good brew in a cup. With good coffee her citizens want good food. And what’s even better is that these examples won’t bust your wallet or break your debit/credit.

CAUTION: The following food photos from Seattle you are about to see may cause unstoppable drooling. If you get a terrible case of the noms, I claim full responsibility.

( Click here for more )

The Spheres, Amazon Spheres, 6th and Lenora, Amazon, Denny Regrade, Denny Triangle, Seattle, Washington, fotoeins.com

Seattle: curious glowing Amazon Spheres

Above: (A) The Spheres, northeast from 6th Avenue and Lenora Street (HL).

Glowing glass forms appear around the corner as if they’ve risen suddenly from the ground, eliciting odd looks and interested inquiries from passersby.

On Amazon’s urban campus at the feet of towers Day One and Doppler, The Spheres are located in downtown Seattle on Lenora Street between 6th Avenue and 7th Avenue. The futuristic structures provide a highly visible centre of attention for the electronic-commerce and -computing company. Three intersecting glass and steel half-spheres will contain a botanic garden to include exotic plants, waterfalls, and treehouses, and workspaces to further cultivate creativity by and collaboration among Amazon employees. The grand opening is scheduled for 18 January 2018.

The construction development projects are part of the joint efforts by NBBJ and Amazon to regenerate the Denny Regrade area with ample office space for the world headquarters of Amazon, and additional space for retail and public facilities.

The Spheres, Amazon Spheres, 7th and Lenora, Amazon, Denny Regrade, Denny Triangle, Seattle, Washington, fotoeins.com

(B) The Spheres, northwest from 7th and Lenora (HL).

Seattle Municipal Archives, item no. 4011

(C) Seattle Municipal Archives, item no. 4011.

Denny Hill was regraded and removed in multiple phases between 1898 and 1931. In the 1930 picture above (C), the 2017 Spheres in image (B) would be located to the right of the utility pole between the two cars in the foreground and the digging excavator in the background.


I made photos (A) and (B) above on 10 December 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aVe.

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