Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Pacific Ocean’

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 2 cultures, 1 ocean (Seattle SAM)

Something bright red and green catches my eye.

Imbedded in bright red, I see an elongated “eye” whose shape is familiar and prevalent within First Nations’ art from the Pacific Northwest (northeast Pacific). I’m also acquainted with that shade of green, not only from Chinese jade but also with the “pounamu” or “greenstone” from New Zealand.

In the Seattle Art Museum, the “Pacific Currents” display represents a variety of cultures across the big (western) ocean. I can’t say I’m surprised why I’m greatly attracted to this piece of art, a piece which represents my place of birth and a place of renewal.

The caption accompanying this beautiful green-red sculpture reads:

Canoe/Waka, 2007.

Blown and sand-carved glass, pounamu (New Zealand jade), red sealing wax.

Preston Singletary (Tlingit, born 1963) and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner (Māori, born 1972).

Collection of Preston Singletary.

“Revivals of traditional watercraft-building among Pacific Northwest indigenous people and Māori of New Zealand have become a catalyst for composing songs and dances, creating masks and regalia, and reviving oral traditions. In Canoe/Waka, the artists pay homage to the canoe as a vessel of knowledge. Gardiner carves pounamu – associated with chiefs and expressions of peace – as the canoe prow while Singeltary sand-carves the glass that forms the canoe’s structure.”

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

“Canoe/Waka”, by Preston Singletary and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner


I made the photos on 9 February 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9KT.

North Bondi Rocks, Bondi Icebergs, Bondi Beach, Sydney, Australia, Pacific Ocean, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Crashing down Sydney’s North Bondi

I’m at Bondi Icebergs, and my long-glass is primed across the beach to the huge waves crashing against the rocks at North Bondi’s Ben Buckler Point.

The surf forecast predicted waves up to 3- to 4-metres (10 to 13 feet) in height. Judging by where people stood at the overlook (to the left), that wave crash is about 10 metres (33 feet) high from base to peak. It’s a great example of the power of the Pacific Ocean, but it’s also a great example of “a fluid with large linear momentum striking a perpendicular surface, resulting in an almost ‘elastic’ collision”.

I still have a love of all things physics, and I do like crashy things …

I made the photo at Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia on 3 June 2013 with the Canon EOS450D (XSi) camera, EF 70-300 zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/640s, f/8, ISO200, 225mm focal length (360mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5Et, and is part of the Travel Photo Thursday series.

San Francisco: Ocean Beach, alone & deep in thought

In March 2012, I visited Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Caifornia. What’s left of the Sutro Baths invite people to walk in, through, and around the ruins. A benefit to visiting, even on a very windy day, is the proximity to the water, the Pacific Ocean.

Ocean Beach, Sutro Baths, San Francisco, CA, USA

Standing a few metres away from the water, I saw a woman standing alone in front of the surf. Although it was windy and some surf was reaching the ruins, the woman stood still for minutes, looking out into the ocean.

Briefly, I feared she was contemplating a jump into the ocean. But my fears were unfounded, as she eventually walked away and back up the slope towards the parking lot.

Whatever she was thinking, I hope she found what she was looking.

I made this photo at Ocean Beach in San Francisco on 18 March 2012. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

Santa Monica, CA: Route 66 ends at the Pier

February 2012.

In greater Los Angeles, the Santa Monica Pier is a well-described attraction and visited by many. As a boy watching tv-show exteriors and locations from southern California, I’ve always wanted to visit Santa Monica and its Pier. Yes, the Pier is a tourist trap, but I cannot resist either beach or the ocean.

I was staying with friends living in Santa Monica, and on a warm sunny February afternoon, I walked to the Pier in 20 minutes, and spent a number of hours finding the end to highway US-66, admiring the 1909 Santa Monica Pier and the beach, and communing with the Pacific.

The western terminus to US route 66 is at the intersection of Olympic Boulevard and Lincoln Boulevard in Santa Monica, but the more “natural” extension west to the ocean leads to Santa Monica Pier. The latter is more “myth and legend”, partly because an expansive view of beach and the Pacific are more attractive than an ordinary urban intersection#.

I suppose it’s patently obvious but it’s worth repeating: you cannot drive a car onto the end of the Santa Monica Pier. Visitors must park elsewhere, and get their feet walking (or smaller portable wheels rolling) onto the pier proper. And at the end of the pier, one might lean on the wood railing and stare into the waters of the Pacific, and think about where and how far their journey has gone or yet to go: if it’s to mark the start of a Route 66 road trip, if it marks the end of a Route 66 drive which began halfway across the country in Chicago, or if it marks the first phase of a year-long around-the-world trip.

#Route 66: America’s Longest Small Town“, Jim Hinckley (Voyageur Press, Minneapolis), 2017.

( Click here for images and more )

Venice Beach, promenade, Los Angeles, California, USA

Venice Beach, California

A walk along the promenade along Venice Beach promises the following:

  • a wide array of people, both residents living nearby and travelers from afar;
  • street art, street food, street wares;
  • and there’s always a surprise.

( Click here for images and more )

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