Fotoeins Fotografie

my looks, of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Pacific Ocean’

Seaward Kaikoura mountain range, on KiwiRail Coastal Pacific train, Picton to Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twenty-eight

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

14 July 2012.

It’s the slow measured surface journey from Wellington to Christchurch. After the morning passage across Cook Strait to Picton, I hop on board Kiwi Rail’s Coastal Pacific for the southbound train along the South Island’s east coast. The train includes covered open-air cars for a very breezy view of the surrounding landscape. Shortly before arrival in Kaikoura, I look back to the northwest for a view of the mountains in the Seaward Kaikoura Range; these mountains are considered the northern tip of the Southern Alps (Kā Tiritiri o te Moana).

I made the image on 14 Jul 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/400-sec, f/4.5, ISO400, and 30mm focal length (48mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mei.

Waipio Valley Lookout, Waipio Valley, Wailoa Stream, Muliwai Trail, Kohala volcano, Pacific Ocean, Big Island, Hawaii, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, three

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

21 Jan 2012.

On the north coast of the Big Island, Hawaii route 240 stops abruptly at the Waipio Valley Lookout. Onwards the steep valley road down is navigable only to 4-wheel drive vehicles. At the bottom is a black-sand beach and privately owned land with taro fields. The lush steeply carved valley dominates the view, with Haleakalā on Maui appearing in the distance at right. This location is also at the southeast corner of the now-extinct Kohala volcano.

I made the image above on 21 Jan 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and the following settings: 1/320-sec, f/8, ISO100, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lwv.

Laupahoehoe Beach Park, Laupahoehoe Point, Laupahoehoe, Hamakua Coast, Big Island, Hawaii, United States, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, two

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

21 Jan 2012.

I’m back on the Big Island. My 5 years working at Gemini Observatory South in Chile offered opportunities to travel and meet with my colleagues at Gemini North in Hilo. At the initial stages of my RTW, my return to the Big Island includes a more complete drive around the island’s outer edge.

We see the road sign, and turn off from the highway for the short drive down to the park by the shoreline. This is Laupāhoehoe, an idyllic spot with a small beach, some spots for fishing, and a place simply to enjoy the tropical Pacific view. Once, the town here had up to 2000 people farming and harvesting taro root and sugar cane crops during the first-part of the 20th-century, but the trauma of the 1946 tsunami and the steep decline in profit from sugar-making changed the town forever.

Now, it’s the frequent crash of ocean waves on the shore, interrupted by the squeals and laughter of children. Ghosts have never sounded better.

I made the image above on 21 Jan 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/8, ISO100, and 53mm focal length (85mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lwT.

Playa del Mar, Coquimbo, Cruz del tercer milenio, La Serena, Region de Coquimbo, Chile, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in La Serena: February summer sunset

I highlight the La Serena-Coquimbo area in north-central Chile, where I lived from 2006 to 2011 after many visits to the area between mid-1990s and the early aughts.

5 Mar – Playa de 4 Esquinas (Beach at the 4 Corners).
12 Mar – Cruz del tercer milenio (Cross of the Third Millennium).
19 Mar – Embalse Puclaro (Puclaro dam and reservoir).
26 Mar – Pisco Elqui.

The shallow J-shaped bay and the 10-km long narrow strip of sand facing the Pacific Ocean is very popular in summer with visitors streaming into town from Argentina, Brazil, and other parts of Chile, ballooning both people- and vehicle-numbers. Always worth spending is time on the beach on a calm sunny morning or on a windy cloudy afternoon. The image here is late-afternoon on a beautiful warm late-summer day in February with the sun setting over the Coquimbo peninsula across the bay.

I made the photo above on 22 February 2006 with a Canon PowerShot A510. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-jtG.

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 2 cultures, 1 ocean (Seattle SAM)

Something bright red and green catches my eye.

Imbedded in bright red, I see an elongated “eye” whose shape is familiar and prevalent within First Nations’ art from the Pacific Northwest (northeast Pacific). I’m also acquainted with that shade of green, not only from Chinese jade but also with the “pounamu” or “greenstone” from New Zealand.

In the Seattle Art Museum, the “Pacific Currents” display represents a variety of cultures across the big (western) ocean. I can’t say I’m surprised why I’m greatly attracted to this piece of art, a piece which represents my place of birth and a place of renewal.

The caption accompanying this beautiful green-red sculpture reads:

Canoe/Waka, 2007.

Blown and sand-carved glass, pounamu (New Zealand jade), red sealing wax.

Preston Singletary (Tlingit, born 1963) and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner (Māori, born 1972).

Collection of Preston Singletary.

“Revivals of traditional watercraft-building among Pacific Northwest indigenous people and Māori of New Zealand have become a catalyst for composing songs and dances, creating masks and regalia, and reviving oral traditions. In Canoe/Waka, the artists pay homage to the canoe as a vessel of knowledge. Gardiner carves pounamu – associated with chiefs and expressions of peace – as the canoe prow while Singeltary sand-carves the glass that forms the canoe’s structure.”

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

“Canoe/Waka”, by Preston Singletary and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner


I made the photos on 9 February 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9KT.

%d bloggers like this: