Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Mittenwald’

Europe, May 2018: final 14 days (of 27)

Above: “Monocle”, on ÖBB regional train near Kitzbühel, Austria – 13 May 2018.

From 8 May to 4 June 2018, I travelled through Austria and Germany for 27 consecutive days by train with a two-country Eurail rail pass. I obtained over 10-thousand frames over the four-week span: the mirrorless Fujifilm X70 with fixed-lens prime accounted for 8020 images (77%), and the full-frame Canon 6D with changeable zoom-glass accounted for 2449 images (23%). From this giant haul of pictures, the following provides glimpses and visuals to the final 14 of 27 days, including stays in Salzburg, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, München, and Köln.

(The first 13 days here)

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Am Quicken, Klais, Krün, Mittenwald, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Upper Bavaria, Oberbayern, Bavaria, Bayern, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Am Quicken im Schnee (Mittenwald)

The town of Klais has over one thousand years of history. That’s not obvious looking out from the train passing through between Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Mittenwald. But within easy reach on foot are the ruins of the Scharnitz monastery, the remnant of a Roman road, and open fields with views like the one above to Wettersteinspitzen.

(The approach on foot in winter is possible on groomed paths from Mittenwald or from Klais itself.)

I made the picture above on 1 March 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/20, ISO1000, 47mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aMa.

Fasching, Maschkera, Oimrausch: pre-Lent shenanigans in southern Germany

This ain’t no Hallowe’en1.

This is Fasching and Maschkera in southern Germany. It’s also about about distinctions and differences by comparison with Karneval on the Rhein.

Festivities take place before Catholic Lent, and the key idea behind the wild colourful costumes and wooden masks is the very pagan origin and ritual of driving out or driving away evil spirits of winter lurking inside people and their homes and welcoming the friendly spirits of spring for a productive growing season.

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Bundesstrasse 2, B2, Mittenwald, Karwendel, Bergwelt Karwendel, Bayern, Bavaria, Oberbayern, Upper Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Karwendel soars over Mittenwald

On the Bundesstrasse 2* in Upper Bavaria between Munich and Innsbruck is the German Alpine town of Mittenwald next to the Isar river. Towering above town to the east-southeast is the snow-covered wall that is the Karwendel mountain range. The Karwendelbahn gondola takes visitors, hikers and skiiers, and employees of Bergwelt Karwendel up to over 2240 metres (7350 feet) in elevation. The ridge line along the very top is the Germany-Austria border.

* The road signage at the intersection of Mühlenweg and Weidenweg points the way towards German highway Bundesstrasse B2. B2 also has the European (B-class) road label E533.


I made the picture above on 27 February 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 lens, and the following settings: 1/640-sec, f/16, ISO1000, and 24-mm focal length. Die Fotoaufnahme ist mit Wasserzeichen versehen worden. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aMd.

Petrikirche, Taufkirche, Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Tracing Martin Luther’s steps in 16 German cities

Above/featured: “Luther war hier. // Luther was here.” Eisleben, Germany (HL, 27 Oct 2016).

In pre-teen years, I attended a Catholic elementary school by weekday, and a missions-oriented Protestant church by weekend. I already had multiple questions running around my pre-scientist brain, like electrons appearing and dissipating in a fuzzy halo. When various disparate elements began to settle with few satisfying answers, I left behind the churches and their respective religions. But one thing that’s remained is my love of history. History has never been boring, because I carry the past (as offspring of immigrants), and I’m determined to bring history’s lessons into the present.

Even in youth, I had to ask: why was one set of churches called “Protestant”? What was under protest? How did one man help spark a movement that would help merge and create a version of a language that continues today, that would bring accessible means to literacy for the public, and that would begin to change rule by religion to rule by law?

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