Fotoeins Fotografie

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Posts tagged ‘indigenous culture’

Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Salish Girl,” by Susan Point

On the Point Grey campus of the University of British Columbia stands the Reconciliation Pole, carved by Haida hereditary chief and master carver 7idansuu (Edenshaw), known also by James Hart. The pole was raised on 1 April 2017 in a grand ceremony.

Above the “residential school” are several standing figures holding each other’s hands; a young girl with a bright red tunic was carved by Susan Point. Their feet aren’t shown, representing the lack of grounding and abundance of abuse. A blight on the nation’s history, the Canadian government stole an estimated 150-thousand indigenous children from their families, forcing them into residential schools across the country. Countless people, family generations, and once intact regional cultures were systematically destroyed, amounting to a state-sanctioned program of cultural genocide.

The Reconciliation People is a small step in not only an admission of guilt, but a part of the forward-moving process of remembrance by Canadians and reconciliation between First Nations and the national government.

Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

I made the photo above on 22 Aug 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime with settings 1/280-sec, f/16, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kBS.

Susan Point, Fusion, Marpole, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Fusion,” by Susan Point

A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally. About her sculpture Point writes (City of Vancouver):

“Fusion” is an artwork that marries mediums and cultures … as well as legends. It also, metaphorically, fuses natural imagery with modern methods. The sculpture is contemporary yet unmistakably Salish. As this development sits in traditional Musqueam territory and is close to the banks of the Fraser River, my conceptual art piece is based on the theme of “people of the Grass” as well as the “Salmon People” which is uniquely Musqueam. The human element within the salmon has universal appeal that symbolically relates to all peoples. The faces are revealed with traditional Salish elements. Overall, the forms represent a living thriving culture and our historical legacy; as well as this unique community today … giving a sense of place and a landmark that respects the past, present and future.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJI.

Susan Point, Consonance, Mount Pleasant, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Consonance,” by Susan Point

A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally.

“… Point designed this pod of swimming whales. She said that the word ‘consonance’ implies harmony and agreement among the components or a dialogue or repeated sounds. Whales dominate legends that show the interconnectedness of all life and are used extensively in First Nations art. The artist also repeated a theme used in other art she has created: the need for respect and an obligation to care for the whales and each other.”

“Public Art in Vancouver: Angels Among Lions”, by John Steil and Aileen Stalker, 2009.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/8, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJE.

Susan Point, Cedar Connection, YVR Airport, Richmond, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Cedar Connection,” by Susan Point

•   A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally.
•   Connecting the landscape with the Musqueam people, the red-cedar sculpture is in the shape of a tall old-growth tree stump for the trees in the surrounding temperate rainforest; the central wavy-like features represent the waters of the Fraser River.
•   Sculpture installed 2009 at Vancouver International Airport, (landside) inside the covered passage between the Canada Line station and the domestic terminal.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/11, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJB.

Susan Point, Blue Herons, TASC1, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Blue Herons,” by Susan Point

•   A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally.
•   “Blue Herons“, originally commissioned for the Richmond Olympic Oval.
•   Shown above is the 3rd of 3 panels, carved and painted red cedar.
•   Blue heron surrounded by salmon on the Fraser River; animals and physical setting vital to the Musqueam people, their culture and history, and to the health of the regional ecosystem.
•   Panels installed 2008 within the Technology & Science Complex 1 (TASC 1) at Simon Fraser University.

I made the photo above on 8 Nov 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/60-sec, f/3.6, and ISO4000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJz.

Lisa Hilli, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday at Vancouver AG: Lisa Hilli

Above/featured: Sisterhood Lifeline (2018).

Lisa Hilli: Gunantuna (Papua New Guinea).

‘Sisterhood Lifeline’ assembles a standard office cubicle in the gallery; large wallpapers feature First Nations vavine (women) in stark white spaces, exchanging discreet gestures of comfort. An audio recording on the office telephone recounts real-life situations experienced by the artist’s friends and colleagues in the workplace, which reveal the in/visibility of their bodies, voices, and agency. This work engages with Indigenous power and presence within the context of Eurocentric cultural institutions wherein vavine – considered here beyond binary constructions of gender – must hold space and make way for their communities. The term “sisterhood lifeline” is borrowed from Areej Nur, a writer and producer at 3CR Community Radio in Melbourne, Australia.


“Transits and Returns” presents the work of 21 Indigenous artists whose practices are both rooted in the specificities of their cultures and routed via their travels. These forces of situatedness and mobility work in synergy and in tension with one another, shaping the multiple ways of understanding and being Indigenous today. Within the exhibition, these dual realities are explored through themes of movement, territory, kinship and representation, with many artworks inhabiting multiple categories. The resulting presentation foregrounds the creative sovereignty of each artist to determine their own articulations of the world, while also exploring the resonances between them.

Featuring artists from local First Nations, as well as those from communities located throughout the Pacific region (ranging from Alutiiq territory in the north to Māori lands in the south, with many mainland and island Nations in between), Transits and Returns traces wide-ranging experiences that are inclusive of both ancestral knowledges and global connections.

The descriptions are directly from the Vancouver Art Gallery where Lisa Hilli’s work is on exhibition until 23 February 2020.

I made the photo above on 15 Oct 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime (18.5/28) with the following settings: 1/100-sec, f/4, and ISO4000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-g4L.

T'uy't'tanat-Cease Wyss, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday at Vancouver AG: T’uy’t’tanat-Cease Wyss

Above/featured: K’axwch’k Nexw7y’ay’ulh (Turtle Journeys), from the Sacred Teachings series, 2018.

T’uy’t’tanat-Cease Wyss: Skwxwú7mesh, Stó:lō, Métis, Kanaka Maoli, Irish, Swiss.

The snap above is from a video which shows the artist’s Hawaiian cultural and spiritual mentor, Happy Kahuna Pahia. In the light of dusk at Papa’iloa Beach on the leeward side of O’ahu in Hawaii, we see her lying beside a ‘honu’, a green sea turtle, who’s come to rest on shore and harden her shell after travelling great distances in the ocean.


“Transits and Returns” presents the work of 21 Indigenous artists whose practices are both rooted in the specificities of their cultures and routed via their travels. These forces of situatedness and mobility work in synergy and in tension with one another, shaping the multiple ways of understanding and being Indigenous today. Within the exhibition, these dual realities are explored through themes of movement, territory, kinship and representation, with many artworks inhabiting multiple categories. The resulting presentation foregrounds the creative sovereignty of each artist to determine their own articulations of the world, while also exploring the resonances between them.

Featuring artists from local First Nations, as well as those from communities located throughout the Pacific region (ranging from Alutiiq territory in the north to Māori lands in the south, with many mainland and island Nations in between), Transits and Returns traces wide-ranging experiences that are inclusive of both ancestral knowledges and global connections.

The descriptions are directly from the Vancouver Art Gallery where T’uy’t’tanat-Cease Wyss’ video installation is on exhibition until 23 February 2020. With her work as artist and ethnobotanist, she was named by the Vancouver Public Library as Indigenous Storyteller in Residence for 2018.

I made the photo above on 15 Oct 2019 with a Fujifilm X70. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-g51.

Marianne Nicolson, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday at Vancouver AG: Marianne Nicolson

Above/featured: ‘Oh, How I Long for Home’ (2016).

I first saw this work warmly illuminating the empty concourse late at night in the Academic Quadrangle at my alma mater of Simon Fraser University. It’s great even more eyeballs can see this on display at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Marianne Nicolson: Dzawada’enuxw, Scottish.

The Kwak’wala phrase “Wa’lasan xwalsa kan ne’kakwe” translates into the English title of this artwork, ‘Oh, How I Long for Home’, while also referencing the dawn. This double meaning could be interpreted as the rising sun ‘returning home’ each day and as a poetic assertion of Kwakwaka’wakw People’s sovereignty over their lands and waters, which includes Nicolson’s home community of Gwa’yi or Kingcome Inlet along the central coast of British Columbia in Canada. Yet the neon sign – which was, at one time, ubiquitous in the streets of Vancouver – is also a marker of urban life, a site of conflicted promise for Indigenous Peoples. Longing for home is an experience with which many can identify, one that’s further complicated when considering the unceded territories upon which British Columbia is built, and the impossibility of returning to a home prior to colonization.


“Transits and Returns” presents the work of 21 Indigenous artists whose practices are both rooted in the specificities of their cultures and routed via their travels. These forces of situatedness and mobility work in synergy and in tension with one another, shaping the multiple ways of understanding and being Indigenous today. Within the exhibition, these dual realities are explored through themes of movement, territory, kinship and representation, with many artworks inhabiting multiple categories. The resulting presentation foregrounds the creative sovereignty of each artist to determine their own articulations of the world, while also exploring the resonances between them.

Featuring artists from local First Nations, as well as those from communities located throughout the Pacific region (ranging from Alutiiq territory in the north to Māori lands in the south, with many mainland and island Nations in between), Transits and Returns traces wide-ranging experiences that are inclusive of both ancestral knowledges and global connections.

The descriptions are directly from the Vancouver Art Gallery where Dr. Nicolson’s work is on exhibition until 23 February 2020.

I made the photo above on 15 Oct 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime (18.5/28) with the following settings: 1/105-sec, f/4, and ISO4000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-g4n.

Great Hall, Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

🇨🇦 National Indigenous Peoples Day (21 June) & Indigenous Artists

Above/featured: Great Hall, Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver – 5 May 2017 (6D1).

In Canada, National Aboriginal Day is held on or near the same day as northern summer solstice to celebrate language, culture, and tradition on the longest day of the year. In 1996, then Governor-General of Canada, Roméo LeBlanc, proclaimed June 21 as National Aboriginal Day. In 2017, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the change to National Indigenous Peoples Day to include First Nations, Inuit, and Métis indigenous peoples.

To highlight some wonderfully engaging work by contemporary indigenous artists, I provide examples of art seen and exhibited in both Vancouver and Seattle.


( Click here for images and more )

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